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New Boots too tight?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Today I just bought a new pair of Dalbello Crypton Cross boots.  In the store they felt tight, but not super tight, when I tried them on, although person working with me heated the liner for me to try to get the outside of the toe area to expand so it wasnt so tight.  I have a wide foot at the toe and balls of my feet but no where else.  Today when I got home I put them on again and they felt tighter then in the store, painfully tight, on the outside of the toe area and the arch of one of my foot started to hurt.  Is this something that will get better with wear or did I buy boots that were too tight?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 18

A couple of things:

1) When properly buckled in and skiing your heel is pushed into the heel pocket so your foot might be further back.  Buckle the top buckles lightly and flex a few times to shove the heel back there and then judge.

 

2) the liners will likely pack out a bit giving you a bit more room.

 

3) you will likely need the toe box punched out, but you don't want to punch them out too far, so most shops have you ski a few hours before punching anything.  Don't worry, eventually the boots will fit, but they will need some work.  I had to take my latest boots back for more punching several times.  I guess they are used to people complaining about pain when there isn't much cause to complain, and I'm used to pain without complaining too much.

post #3 of 18

I can't answer for you. 

My story: I bought a pair of boots last spring -- getting lots of attention from one of the best bootfitters I've bumped into (Nick Blaylock @ Mt. Snow).  Loved them.  But this winter, every time I put them on, they feel way too tight.  The first hour or so is almost painful.  Then, suddenly, they feel great. 

 

I offer a couple of things:

1. (this idea is completely unscientific and may be rubbish):  I think the boots sort of "pack out" a little each day.  When they sit for a week or more in a warm house, the liners slowly expand just a little.  Putting my foot back into them after this is painful until the liners pack back down infintesimally. 

 

2.  (this practice is WAY more supportable by testimony from boot experts): I've learned I need to buckle the boots loosely in the beginning.  I even ski a few runs with buckles very loose.  Then, when foot has found its home in the boot, I start buckling to normal tension.  This has alleviated most of my morning pain and is a pragmatic solution to a nagging problem.

 

Best.

post #4 of 18

He's ^^^right. There is a way to put on boots, especially new ones. While you have the foot flexed forward, buckle the buckles over the instep, that will hold the foot back. Then gradually tighten everything a little more. In the shop, they likely get your foot in the exact right position, making a little more space.

 

Either get preliminary partial punches/grinds and ski a day or two and go back to fine tune, or ski a couple days and then go in for full on punches and or grinds. 

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

thanks for the input. i just put them on and stepped into the bindings for about 10 or 15 minutes and when i took the boots off my right pinky toe was numb from being squeezed into my other toes.  Do you still think this is something fix-able?  I am leaving tomorrow for a 4 day ski trip so im trying to decide if I should try 2 bring these back and try to get another pair once there is more selection before next season or if I should ski them and hope for the best...this is really the first time i've bought a good pair of ski boots so I dont really know what im doing.

post #6 of 18

You should takethem back and get them to punch out that area of the boot a little bit for you.  It only takes about 1/2 an hour to do, but there may be a waiting list.

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

how much can they punch them out? because right now its super tight. I wasnt able to try on as many boots as id like because its late in the season and most places dont have much left.  So im thinking maybe I should just bring them back and wait until next years stuff comes out so that I have more choices...

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post


1. (this idea is completely unscientific and may be rubbish):  I think the boots sort of "pack out" a little each day.  When they sit for a week or more in a warm house, the liners slowly expand just a little.  Putting my foot back into them after this is painful until the liners pack back down infintesimally. 

 

2.  (this practice is WAY more supportable by testimony from boot experts): I've learned I need to buckle the boots loosely in the beginning.  I even ski a few runs with buckles very loose.  Then, when foot has found its home in the boot, I start buckling to normal tension.  This has alleviated most of my morning pain and is a pragmatic solution to a nagging problem.

 

Best.


icon14.gif

 

New boots do fit too tight if you want them to fit right for the long term.  I actually prefer to buy a new pair in the spring and..

 

A) Ski them while it is warmer the first time or two.

and

B) Put them on several times for several hours over the summer to allow them to "pack out" as we say.

 

Make sure your foot is positioned properly on the footbed then gradually buckle them tighter as they break in.  If they are unbearable even when buckled very loosely than they probably do need to be punched out some.  Buying boots that feel really good the first time you wear them will usually result in them being too big after a couple weeks of skiing in them after they pack out.  Most people end up with this sloppy set up. 

 

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

I'm going on a 4 day ski trip starting tomorrow so I dont have time to go get the toe punched out.  If my pinky toe goes numb from the pressure in a matter of minutes do you think that I should bring the new boots or stick with my old stuff until I can get these figured out? thats my main dilemma right now...

post #10 of 18

Not sure if the Krypton Cross is like the Krypton Pro, which comes with two sets of foot boards. They go in the bottom of the shell and your liners sit on top of them.  My Pros came with a rigid pair, and a rubbery one, which is for banging around in the park.  Anyway, mine were very tight when they were new, so the dealer told me to put the softer boards in, which gave me a little cushion and resulted in more room when skiing.  Eventually my liners packed out a little and I switched to the rigid boards.

 

If the boots did not come with the rubbery boot boards in them, or as an extra, you can probably buy a pair.  I got some for my wife from a Full Tilt dealer for $25.

post #11 of 18

They can punch them out quite a bit. 

When you put you boot shells on and stand in them without the liners in them, do your toes touch the shell on both sides (mine were)?  If so how much more room would you need for clearance? 

 

BTW did you know we have an "Ask the boot guys" section here where only professional approved boot fitters get to answer you question?  It may take longer to get an answer without anyone being free to volunteer some help, but they have the proven knowledge.  http://www.epicski.com/forum/list/73

post #12 of 18

None of us can see your feet -- or feel your toes.  No one knows where you are or where you're going. But...
Do you trust the guy who fit you?  Or was he just trying to sell a pair of boots and making something do?

If boot was fit by a good fitter and you trust overall situation, you can try mudfoot's idea, or you can get toe area punched out/expanded at almost any good shop.  So if you don't have time before you go, do it while you're there.  Ask around and find a reputable place that fits boots as well as selling skis and jackets.  As someone said, something like this might be 30-40 minutes.  It's not rocket science, but you want a fitter/experienced person doing it. 

 

If you just don't feel like you really understood or trusted the situation, maybe you should return the boots.  Only you know. 

post #13 of 18

How about a thinner sock...women's hose thin if necessary or replace the boot board with a thinner one, make one if you have to. Or you can take a razor blade and make vertical slits to the outside of the liner where the pressure is the greatest.

post #14 of 18

Quote:

Originally Posted by cal22 View Post

I'm going on a 4 day ski trip starting tomorrow so I dont have time to go get the toe punched out.  If my pinky toe goes numb from the pressure in a matter of minutes do you think that I should bring the new boots or stick with my old stuff until I can get these figured out? thats my main dilemma right now...

without being there with you, no one can tell you if these boots fit or if there are boots which might fit better.

 

If you're not sure about them, I would take them along on the trip, but plan on demo-ing boots ... especially the first day or 2.

Depending where you're going you might/should find a decent shop for demoing. Then you can try boots and 'fit' to what might suit you.

 

I wouldn;t chance ruining my ski trip, and markup some boots which might need to be returned.

If things are that 'iffy' I wouldnt chance it...

if you absolutely require boot mods I wouldn;t hurry through that process - nor would I try skiing in something which hurts from the get-go.

especially on a multi-day trip.

the extra $40-$50 a day for good demos might not seem as money well spent, until you find that you can;t even put your foot into boots on day 2 or 3 - whether they are the Dalbellos or any set of demos...

just my .02

 

post #15 of 18

The Krypton Cross is built on a 98mm last, which is fairly narrow as ski boots go and is about equal to a "C" width shoe.  If you wear "C" width shoes they should be fine for width but if you normally wear a "D" or wider shoe, the boot is most likely too narrow for your foot.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis on fitting, then do a shell fit on your own, if it wasn't done in the store, and see if they're the correct length.  Did you get the model with the Intuition liner or the standard Dalbello liner?  If you got the Intuition liner I can tell you from experience that they may need to be heat molded to your feet more than once.

 

post #16 of 18

If you have feet like mine, with a wide ball and narrow heel, getting a boot that doesn't require a toe punch will have your hell swimming in it and never fit.  You probably got the right boots, but just need to adjust them now.

post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 


Thanks for everyone with the input.  Its greatly appreciated.  I think ill hold off on dealing with the boots until after im back then see what the shop has to say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

They can punch them out quite a bit. 

When you put you boot shells on and stand in them without the liners in them, do your toes touch the shell on both sides (mine were)?  If so how much more room would you need for clearance? 

 

BTW did you know we have an "Ask the boot guys" section here where only professional approved boot fitters get to answer you question?  It may take longer to get an answer without anyone being free to volunteer some help, but they have the proven knowledge.  http://www.epicski.com/forum/list/73

Thanks, I realized that I was just hoping for some quick answers today since im going away.  I think I have the same problem as you did where the heels fit well but my foot gets wider as it gets to the toe and it brushes the sides of the shell.  Going to go back to the boot fitter next weekend and see what I he can do.
 

 

post #18 of 18

Ski boots should never cause pain !  It amazes me how some people think they need to tolerate pain to get performance out of their ski boots.  I've skied in boots that caused pain, and it makes you ski worse, since you either consscously or subcsonsiously  will ski in a way to avoid the pain, or at least delay or minimize the onset of pain. 

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