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What can you do to make a boot stiffer

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I  want more support out of my boots, which are finally nice and comfy.  They are Solomon Crossmax 10s, and while they may be ok when it's 30 below, or when skiing with the kids, they are just not stiff enough when skiing big angles at 50 mph, especially in the spring.  Can anything be done to make them stiffer, or would I be further ahead to go back to working on the liners of my Koflachs (my other pet project that is on the back burner due to lack of funds).

post #2 of 13

What bindings are you using Ghost?  What is your boot sole length?  Just trying to assess your delta angle to see if simply gas pedaling your boots would solve your problem?  You may want to try placing a shim (about 3mm max) between your afd and boot sole  to test this hypothesis!  You will notice the boot reacts quicker with less ankle flex and will stand you up a bit taller.  All this will make the boot fee stiffer.  You may actually end up wanting more than a 3mm lift depending on the binding stand height differential and your boot sole length but 3mm is a good starting point and will definitely give you some new sensations.

post #3 of 13

also adding a WC booster strap, or a SL plate (extra layer beteween the folds of the shell)

 

but test above too.  maybe both can help

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your reply.

 

Bindngs:  Mostly these days Tyrolia Free Flex 17 + Mounted directly to Volant Machete G, also Marker Comp 16 mounted to the plastic plate that come with Völkl P50F1, Fisher FR12 (I think) on WC SCs), and once in a while Tyrolia 490eek.gif.mounted flat on antique SGs.

 

Boots are Solomon Crossmax 10.0 with 100 Flex indicated. Boot sole length is stamped at 315 mm.

 

Do I understand that you are suggesting I raise he toe of the boot by about 3 mm in order to have the boot flexed closer to it's maximum range when I'm moving forward?

 

post #5 of 13

allow more tip pressure with less forward movment from you.  Bud will probably chime in with his own ideas.

The reason for adding the toe shim I would say is not to permit extra boot flexion.  IT is rather to alter your stance and 

 

 

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks Lou.  That's the effect compressing a spring farther will have, more force.  It will move neutral to more upright also, but I'm not sure I like that idea; I already have considerably reduced forward lean compared to my  old boots.  But it can't hurt to try. 

post #7 of 13

Ghost, your boot has a fair bit of forward lean.  What I suggest may sound counter intuitive but try it and see.  It takes very little effort or expense and is instantly reversible if you dislike it.  I believe you will be surprised!

 

I have been experimenting with progressively more upright stance derived from flattening the delta angle with exciting results.   I am skiing the Scorpion 150 with 5mm of gas pedal.  The first run I went from zero to a 3mm toe lift I thought, "no way" but after successive runs with this set up I was really liking it.  Then just the last time out skiing I went to 5mm lift with the same first run results.  After the first few turns I was searching for some shims in my pockets to put under my heels to negate what I had added under my toes.   Without finding any shims, I continued skiing on the 5mm gas pedal and once again began to readjust and ended the day loving the set up.  Now this only matters when considering the binding model I have been skiing has about a 6mm stand height differential, so I am basically skiing a flat delta.  Your array of bindings have different stand height differentials but I think you can easily move to a bit flatter.

 

Of course if you are skiing aggressively a stiffer lower volume boot may be in your future? and perhaps some newer sticks too!

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Thanks Lou.  That's the effect compressing a spring farther will have, more force.  It will move neutral to more upright also, but I'm not sure I like that idea; I already have considerably reduced forward lean compared to my  old boots.  But it can't hurt to try. 


I think you are missing the affect of what this will do?  Rather than compressing your boot more to return to your previous stance, you will feel a slightly taller cuff neutral stance and an earlier tip pressure as Lou suggested.  You will find as the boot cuff is moved more vertically you will have less leverage to flex it and therefore it will feel a bit stiffer.  When you experiment with this do some one legged skiing and notice how it becomes easier to transition and ski on the little toe edge because you have a bit more support from your boot cuff to lean against.

 

Let us know your results and feedback!

 

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Ok.

What exactly is it I need to stick on the bottom of my boot to shim the toe and how do I stick it there?  Will a piece of wood from an old clementine box work I have one sitting here)?

post #10 of 13

I use bontex insole shims, available at any ski shop, cut into rectangles roughly 1 inch by 2.5 inches.  Simply place the shim on the AFD and carefully step into binding as not to move the shim out of place.  It will stay there until you exit the system.  3mm will not adversely affect your release.

post #11 of 13

If you are happy with the fit and stance angle presently you can always put two T nuts connecting the lower shell to the upper.

 

This will firm the boot considerably...

post #12 of 13

although raising the toe will work well to give the impression of a stiffer boot, i am confident that it will not actually stiffen the boot.

 

this discussion has swerved away from the OP's original question.

 

for that model salomon boot, you could do as johnyatomic said and add rivets that pass from the cuff through the lower.

 

i have also lined the cuff with 2 mm polypropylene sheets. riveting the polypro to the cuff with 2 piece brass rivets.

 

also mtlions suggestion of booster strap and SL plate (place it low on the cuff) would mesh nicely with the above suggestions.

 

or at his point in the season you could get in on all the smokin deals available from retailers clearing out merchandise to make room for water toys and lawn furniture.

 

jim

post #13 of 13

Not certain I agree with Jim here.  Either way as Bud says it is easy to try and almost free.  Making the cuff more upright makes the boot act stiffer.  Jim is correct it isn't actually stiffer but the vector angles change and it will take some of your body weight out of the flexing equation.  I'm with Bud on this.

 

However, other suggestions about mechanically stiffening the boot will work, not certain I agree about the Boosters.  My experience with Boosters is they make boots softer.  but again Boosters are inexpensive and even if they don't make the boot stiffer you'll probably like the more consistent tongue action.

 

Lou

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