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Keep an eye on the little ones...

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 16

Sobering and real video of importance of skiing behind or within quick response time to kids! 

post #3 of 16

Good call out.  It's easy to relax a bit too much when you see a kid skiing that well. I still have to ski right next to my kid. who is just starting to ski without real help  Last time I had to grab his coat sleeve to keep him from hitting a lift tower.  I think along side is probably even better than behind so that they can see and stop and wait should YOU fall.

post #4 of 16

That is a scary video.  I always try to ski behind my kids so that I can help pick them up and put them back together as well as so I know where they went.  On crowded groomers I like to be the "roadblock" between oncoming skiers and my little one.  I ski behind them now by choice, soon out of necessity as they will be faster than me!

post #5 of 16


It is? I see a kid that is somewhat in control take a little tumble then sit there like a tard with his head under the snow.
 

The only real lesson here is that pole straps are a bad idea unless skiing no fall terrain, that and don't take a flailing armed kid into trees on a powder day if he doesn't know what he's doing.

 

 

That is a scary video. 

 

Originally Posted by Pwdrhnd View Post

 

post #6 of 16

I am holding my 3 month old as I type this. The parents learned the wrong lesson. This could have been horrible -- but the danger was the result of ignorance. Keeping an eye on the kids is a vtiital, and teaching the kids to take care of them selves is just as important. Skiers (even kid skiers) who venture into deep unconsolidated snow need to know how to get up when they fall down. The kid could have rolled over if he tried.

post #7 of 16

I guess we all interpret things differently.  As a parent who has skied with his young kids I see the potential for disaster.  If the dad hadn't been there would the kid have dug himself out?  Who knows.  I have inhaled a face full of powder and it can create a feeling of panic.

post #8 of 16

Ya, I have mixed thoughts on this. I was expecting a tree well not just a tumble in the deep. The kid needs to learn how to dig himself out.

 

That being said, two more thoughts:

 

1. Pretty cool to see a kid rocking it in the deep.

2. Regardless of the actual situation, the message of the video holds true. As a parent you should be in the rear. I ski with my two daughters (5 and 7) and constantly have to remind myself of this. They're now ripping pretty hard so it is less of an issue.

 

Speaking of parenting ski related issues. A short story to relay. This Sunday I was out with the girls and they started petitioning for me to take them down Headwall for the first time here in CB. After a few warm up laps it became clear that while the 7 year old was on her game, the 5 year old wasn't. As I was solo parenting, I told them both that we wouldn't be doing Headwall today. The 5 year old was relieved but the 7 year old was pissed. As we skied down from the midway on the High Lift, the 7 year old blew past the top of the Silver Queen (the logical stopping point) and disappeared from view. The 5 year old and I proceeded down the slope and sure enough, she was no where to be seen. We swept the descent down to the base of Twister and at that point I called it into Patrol.

 

I was sure the 7 year old just decided to lap Headwall by herself. A part of me was proud, a part of me was pissed off beyond belief. The story ended just fine and it turns out she did get upset and skied to the bottom of the North Face Lift - what she thought was our next destination. When she realized we weren't coming she made her way back to the base area where we met up.

 

So the story ended well, but it made me feel so helpless as I couldn't abandon the 5 year old to chase down the other. Yet I had no way of contacting her. Guess it is time to order up some kiddie cell phones. Ugh.

 

Oh ya, she's grounded and we have a new rule - stop at the end of each pitch and never go out of view. That being said, we're doing Headwall on Saturday. Figure she's gonna do it one way or another, I might as well show her how to do it the right way.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
 The kid could have rolled over if he tried.


 

...and you know this how?

 

Good job Dad.

 

Thumbs up to the little ripper!

post #10 of 16

Hey so because I am not on facebook the video is unviewable.  Is there a youtube or another link?

post #11 of 16

I think the real lesson learned is that the child wasn't ready for the situation technically and wasn't properly schooled in buddy system hand signals. He was often trying to follow the tracks of the skier in front of him. That's not "rockin' powder" or skiing well at all. That's trying not to ski the powder and helicoptering when one ski went out of the track. Kids that size can ski powder very well; that boy just wasn't doing it. And falling and just laying there as if you are injured or unconscious is too much like crying wolf, and undermines the communication needed for the buddy-system to work. What I see is a dad helping out after making a very bad judgment to begin with, (like rescuing the baby after setting the house on fire). Be patient parents, and prepare and teach first.  Then go out and have a blast, leaving your ego at the door, and putting the kids fun and needs first.

 

Hate to be the grump, but that whole thing sucks, and the POV camera is no doubt part of the cause of pushing-the-envelope type behavior.

 

And yes, the strongest skier always goes last, where he or she can be of help.


Edited by davluri - 3/3/11 at 9:32pm
post #12 of 16

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jag View Post

...and you know this how?

 

Good job Dad.

 

Thumbs up to the little ripper!


Its not knowledge, it was my impression of the situation after watching the video. And that impression has been informed by experience learning to recreate in very deep snow for the past 4 years. There are alot of things the kid could have tried to work himself into a better position. But he never tired and chose to sit there doing nothing.

post #13 of 16


panic and fear often result in non-action. give the kid a break, that was a learning experience. This video is a good learing tool. I don't think they were looking for a MA here. Educating kids and older folks who do not have experience in powder and trees BEFORE they ski them is really important. Earlier this season (jan) a snowboarder died when landing head first in deep powder up at Monashee. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Quote:


Its not knowledge, it was my impression of the situation after watching the video. And that impression has been informed by experience learning to recreate in very deep snow for the past 4 years. There are alot of things the kid could have tried to work himself into a better position. But he never tired and chose to sit there doing nothing.



 

post #14 of 16

First, and this is just from watching kids I've skied with - when they're in deep powder they follow somebody else's tracks because otherwise they can't see or breathe.  Or sometimes even move, they don't weigh much.

 

Second - he's 7.  Maybe he was just laying there and dad overreacted, maybe he really didn't know how to get out, but in either case it was a very good call for dad to be behind to pick up the pieces.  Hopefully somewhere along the line Dad showed him how to manage standing up and clicking back in in powder.

 

And, third - if everybody waited to ski powder until they were capable of completely ripping it then none of us would be skiing powder.  That kid is learning.  Hopefully dad is learning, too, to keep those $)%$#@ straps off of their hands when they're in the trees.

 

That kid is going to rock the casbah in a very short period of time.  Good for him!

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


panic and fear often result in non-action. give the kid a break, that was a learning experience. This video is a good learing tool. I don't think they were looking for a MA here. Educating kids and older folks who do not have experience in powder and trees BEFORE they ski them is really important. Earlier this season (jan) a snowboarder died when landing head first in deep powder up at Monashee. 
 



 


 

I think the kid was skiing well enough to be on that slope with supervision. And I think the buddy system and skiing behind your kids is also great general advice. But that doesn't really adress NARSID specificly.

 

Everytime it snows big, I see people foudering in the deep. And this case seems to have had alot of preventable mistakes.  e.g. falling with his hand out and behind instead of tucked in. wearing pole straps, just sitting there instead of creating an air pocket, etc... 

 

I think some people could benefit from discussion about this and not just move on and chalk it up to experience.

 

 

post #16 of 16

GOOD points!  I think the biggest take-away here (and not blaming the parents) is proper training for off-piste conditions. Yeah the kid will be a great skier some day but he needs to be around to gt there, if ya' know what I mean. 

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