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Need advice from helmet heads

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

After resisting long enough I think it is time I got a helmet.  Although I am a fairly cautious skier I do love steeps, to ski off piste and in the trees, and often go into trees by myself.  Any advice from those experienced with this contraption would be much appreciated.  My concerns are:

1) Getting too hot during spring skiing.  Keeping my head warm on super cold days.

2) How do I talk on the phone when my ears are covered by the helmet.  How much does it impair hearing.  Will I hear the scraping sounds when an out of control board or ski is behind me.

3) Does it limit field of vision?  I assume no more than the goggles do.

4) What brands/models are best for comfort, lightness and durability?

thanks.

 

 

post #2 of 18

you have to go to a ski shop with your goggles and try on all the helmets . all your questions will be answered

post #3 of 18

1. This is gonna be personal, depending on if you're usually hot or cold.  If you're usually hot, get one with as many vents as you can, if you're usually cold, make sure you can fit a very thin balaclava or something under it.  You don't want anything thick under there because it'll mess up the fit and function of the helmet, but a thin layer is fine.  I find mine to be warmer than a hat with everything closed, and cooler than a hat with the vents open, for a reference point.

2. The soft open-ear style like I wear (Giro G9) doesn't impair hearing very much at all.  I feel I can hear pretty much everything.  I can even hold the phone up outside the ear pad and talk on it.  The full ear coverage style, I'm not sure of.

3. No.

4. Find the one that's most comfortable for your head shape.  That's the most important.  And since everyone's head is different, it's tough to tell you which you should look at.  Just try a bunch on in the store.

 

 

*Edit to add:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sol123 View Post

you have to go to a ski shop with your goggles and try on all the helmets . all your questions will be answered

Yeah, what he said.

post #4 of 18

The key is fit... Helmets have to be really snug, tight fit... I would recommend UVEX or POC race helmets... Uvex have an option to close or open   vents  around ears..... It is a little too warm in the spring, but what isn't??? You could talk on the phone with vents open.. Phone has to be on speaker. I suggested brands already..  GL..

post #5 of 18
post #6 of 18

Haha I love that you took the time to compile all those crgildart, but year what he said... but look at Giro Seam and Smith Variant/ Vantage

post #7 of 18

My advice is:

 

Don't ski the trees alone.

 

Don't worry about sight impairment.

 

Do what Sol123 said.

post #8 of 18

I have a Smith Variant, no brim, and have heard the telltale sound of a high speed boarder behind me on several occasions, saved my butt more than once.  I can easily talk on my cell phone with it on.  With a Turtle Fur balaclava on my head, neck and most of my face is warm even on the coldest days.  It has two sets of vents that can each be opened half way or completely and I've never been too warm with both vents wide open.  Go try on as many as you can and be sure to take your goggles with you to make sure the two are compatible.

 

Now, about skiing alone in the trees, do not do it.  If you fall in a tree well a helmet will not save you if you're alone.

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExWanabe View Post

After resisting long enough I think it is time I got a helmet.  Although I am a fairly cautious skier I do love steeps, to ski off piste and in the trees, and often go into trees by myself.  Any advice from those experienced with this contraption would be much appreciated.  My concerns are:

1) Getting too hot during spring skiing.  Keeping my head warm on super cold days.

2) How do I talk on the phone when my ears are covered by the helmet.  How much does it impair hearing.  Will I hear the scraping sounds when an out of control board or ski is behind me.

3) Does it limit field of vision?  I assume no more than the goggles do.

4) What brands/models are best for comfort, lightness and durability?

thanks.

 

 

What a coincidence another helmet thread, and I just started one.....LOL


1) Yes at times it can get quite warm (but only when you are still), make sure the one you buy has many vents.   In the bad cold wear a helmet liner.   I always wear one, its even more sanitary that way you can wash the liner and not stink up your helmet.

2) Skullcandy had/has a system that plugs into your phone and MP3 player that allows you to talk and listen to music, and has a mic.   You can connect it to speakers or headphones of any brand.   There are blue tooth options as well.

3) Does not interfere with field of vision, the helmet edges are outside of the edged of your goggles.

4) You have to try the brands out, they all fit different and everyone has a different head....but if you want the lightest, and want to spend the $$$, splurge on the carbon fiber model of whatever brand helmet you decide on.   Nearly every manufacturer has a carbon fiber model now, though often times they are for racing speed events and have no vents.

 

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks to all for your inputs!  Will definitely look for one with adjustable vents, and will go try some on.  This forum is great for getting responses right away.  And thanks to crgildart for posting the 15 helmet threads; I should have searched first; will try to browse through them.

 

As far as not skiing trees alone; that will be hard to do.  I seldom get to ski with people who are able or willing to venture into the trees, and the trees near the top hold the best snow at my local resort.  Though I usually tell my wife or friend I am skiing with so that they could call ski patrol if I dont come out. 

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I have a Smith Variant, no brim, and have heard the telltale sound of a high speed boarder behind me on several occasions, saved my butt more than once.  I can easily talk on my cell phone with it on.  With a Turtle Fur balaclava on my head, neck and most of my face is warm even on the coldest days.  It has two sets of vents that can each be opened half way or completely and I've never been too warm with both vents wide open.  Go try on as many as you can and be sure to take your goggles with you to make sure the two are compatible.

 

Now, about skiing alone in the trees, do not do it.  If you fall in a tree well a helmet will not save you if you're alone.



A high speed boarder makes little noise (as he's carving).  What you heard were low-speed boarders skidding trying to not run you over...

 

Rarely has my head become too hot from a helmet, but it keeps it from being too cold.

I can hear the phone fine through the earflaps (but I try to avoid talking on the phone while skiing).  Text me if you must, so I can just read the display.

No problems with peripheral vision.

Fit is personal -- like shoes.

 

post #12 of 18
post #13 of 18

Fit is for shape, not just size.  Some heads are more oval, some more circular.

I like soft removable ear flaps and removable vent plugs.  In full on spring mode, mine reminds me of a bike helmet.

(I guess that's not a surprise -- didn't Giro make bike helmets before ski helmets?)

 

I dont talk on the phone much while skiing, but if I have to I find I can wedge the phone between my ear and the ear flap and talk hands-free.

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExWanabe View Post

After resisting long enough I think it is time I got a helmet.  Although I am a fairly cautious skier I do love steeps, to ski off piste and in the trees, and often go into trees by myself.  Any advice from those experienced with this contraption would be much appreciated.  My concerns are:

1) Getting too hot during spring skiing.  Keeping my head warm on super cold days.

 

No, if you are worried about that, get the helmet with ventilation.

 

2) How do I talk on the phone when my ears are covered by the helmet.  How much does it impair hearing.  Will I hear the scraping sounds when an out of control board or ski is behind me.

 

Just jam your phone between your head and earflaps, sometimes it makes for a hands-free talking.

 

3) Does it limit field of vision?

 

No

 

4) What brands/models are best for comfort, lightness and durability?

 

Do what sol123 suggested, with one important modifications: first find a helmet that fits your head, then find goggles that fit that helmet.  Most likeley your old goggles will fit though.

 

thanks.

 

 

Y'r welcome.



 

post #15 of 18

4) What brands/models are best for comfort, lightness and durability?

 

Do what sol123 suggested, with one important modifications: first find a helmet that fits your head, then find goggles that fit that helmet.  Most likeley your old goggles will fit though.

i suggested to go to the store for precisely this reason to find one that fits

post #16 of 18

I have a pair of goggles that are non-helmet compatible because the contours do not exactly match the front of the helmet.  When it was at all cold I got ice cream headaches because the tiny gap between the top of my goggles and helment would freeze from the wind.  I solved the problem by making a thin lycra headband, it stops the freeze but is just one more hassle to deal with. Bottom line, like everyone has mentioned, make sure your goggles and helmet fit together perfectly.

 

I would also recommend a helmet with a small visor.  A little bit goes a long way in keeping the sun out of your eyes, but if it is too snug against the top of your goggles it can inhibit upward air flow out of your goggles and cause fogging.  I am a big sweater and love the dial on the top of my Giro helmet that allows me to open and close the vents with my ski gloves on.

post #17 of 18

First and foremost, NEVER ski the trees alone, no matter what.  Every year in the Tahoe area, multiple skiers and boarders are found dead, upside-down in tree wells throughout the season.  A helmet won't do jack shit to save you from suffocating in a tree well.  Eye opening link to tree well safety here: http://treewelldeepsnowsafety.com/  And if you think it won't happen to you, we just lost a boarder at Northstar this past weekend to a tree well, right next to one of the most trafficked runs on the backside (Challenger). 

 

Secondly, buy a helmet and wear it.  You are not protecting yourself from the occasional crash in off-piste powder, you are protecting yourself from getting a snowboard slammed into the back of your head from some out of control teenager while on the groomers or a bump run going back to the lift.  

 

 

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks lovethesteeps.  The link is very informative and educational.  I have noticed tree wells in the backcountry, but have been lucky not to come across them at downhill resorts, and did not even know they had a name.

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