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What is the ideal weather for ski racing?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Weather is the major factor in alpine ski racing, but I never saw mentioned what is considered ideal. I can think of pluses and minuses about colder or warmer weather, but if it were possible to have perfect conditions what would they be?
post #2 of 23

Clear,sunny, no wind and temperatures in -5*c--10*C/10-20*F/.... IMO.

post #3 of 23

Not raining, foggy, snowing, or windy, preferably not flat light, and a snow surface that is grippy and isn't rutting too badly. If the race is a slalom - temputatures should be low enough to keep the gates from getting wet when they slap the snow or you won't be able to see anything by the bottom of the run... I hate wet goggles.

post #4 of 23

Helluva, isnt it fun when its +3deg and the SL track is salted ski.gif.

post #5 of 23

Perfect conditions are those that penalize your competition more then you.

 

RR said before the Olympics (i forget the year now) his ideal conditions were thick fog and slush (because at his home mountain that is basically what he trained in all the time).  That is exacltey what it was on race day....he won Gold.

post #6 of 23

What Skidude72 said. 

When I first read the post, my thought was "the condition that gives me an edge" (haven't discovered it yet mad.gif ).  Even the kids in the race program where I work ski in everything because you never know what you're going to get around here on race day.  If it's raining, out come the plastic bags.  The only weather they don't train in is what makes it unsafe (determined by the coaches).  In the Marines it was - "If it ain't rainin', you ain't trainin'!"  Everything is harder in the rain; especially cold rain.

 

I would add that some of the least liked conditions are variable winds (then luck comes into play) and anything that screws with your vision.  Rain, snow, cold, warm - doesn't matter because everyone has to deal with it.  Some deal better than others.  Often at the start people wait for the wind to die down just to have a stronger gust hit them after they start.  Then the next racer goes and there's no wind.

 

Hero snow is hero snow for everyone.  Perfect conditions means there isn't going to be much of a difference in times.  At least not with the faster racers.  A few weeks ago we had great conditions and a fairly easy course for the beer league.  Even the newer racers were skiing faster.  Many taking 2-3 seconds off their usual time.  The problem was everyone was doing that so their handicap didn't improve.  Good learning experience because they got to ski faster, but everyone was pretty much in the same order (with the usual up/down movement within the ranks) as always.  The groups were tighter.  Many folks said it was one of their favorite races because their time was so fast, but the conditions didn't help them at all.  The only thing that would have made it better was if the sun was out.  It was cold hardpack and didn't rut up.  It was fun though.

 

Ken

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Helluva, isnt it fun when its +3deg and the SL track is salted ski.gif.



...Not if my goggles are wet... mad.gif

post #8 of 23

We had a slalom last season with grey skies, slushy ruts (some brown in the troughs!), wet falling snow and I had my best result in years. I figured I was concentrating more on the task at hand because the next day dawned with perfect calm, bluebird skies, a firm, cold, dry course for the super g where I was enjoying myself so much that I nearly missed any easy gate and probably missed a placing! Go figure!  Still, I had a huge grin in the sun and probably a grimace in the slush but I'm glad this aint an indoor sport!

post #9 of 23

Perfect is when it is 31 degrees.

 

Your wax was on the money and edges keen.

 

You are the leader.

 

But, the best of them are coming up.  eek.gif

 

There is a course hold for a gate.  popcorn.gif

 

The sun comes out, the temp hits 60 and the whole thing turns to slush.  yahoo.gif

 

My victory secure, the alarm clock goes off and .. smile.gif

post #10 of 23

When I was serious racing, my favorite weather condition for a tough downhill was fog so thick you couldn't see 50 feet ahead of you.  We used to get a lot of it in Europe.  I saw it playing to my advantage, as the other guys might hold back a tad,,, keep there head up a little higher.  

post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 

What you cant see cant hurt you??...sheesh thats nutty.

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

What you cant see cant hurt you??...sheesh thats nutty.



Well, yeah, of course it was nutty, that's what made it an advantage.  Rather tame, though, compared to my self made wind tunnel training method.  I won't even describe it, in case kids are reading.  

post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post





Well, yeah, of course it was nutty, that's what made it an advantage.  Rather tame, though, compared to my self made wind tunnel training method.  I won't even describe it, in case kids are reading.  


Does it include a car and say about six feet of clearance above the car?

 

post #14 of 23
I liked racing in bad weather, it bothered me less than others. Searching for a car-top tuck, so far nothing.
Edited by Snowfan - 4/26/11 at 8:33am
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post




Does it include a car and say about six feet of clearance above the car?

 


Now see what you've done?  That snowfan kid is already googling for how to do it.  biggrin.gif

 

post #16 of 23

Like this?

video by diagonaluk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WfQSY39vQg

 

 

 

Wonder what the bindings are set at.

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 


Now that is a helmet!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Like this?

video by diagonaluk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WfQSY39vQg

 

 

 

Wonder what the bindings are set at.



 

post #18 of 23

After further consideration, my tuck is good enough as it is.

post #19 of 23

OK, the jig is up.  

 

Yeah, that was basically it, except we did it on a real road, at about 80-90 mph through the curves from Lake Placid to Saranac Lake.  Some of you I'm sure know the road.  My old teammate Pat Purcell and I mounted bindings on a pair of 2x4's, and attached them with hinges to the top of my pickup truck cap.   The hinges allowed us to tip as we barreled around the turns, so we could brace and keep from getting ejected sideways.  We mounted the bindings to his boots.  His feet were much smaller than mine, so we took out his liners and I just stood loose foot in his shells when it was my turn to ride.  

 

Crazy days of downhill, the year was 1981.  After leaving competition, somehow fully intact,  Pat and I both went into coaching.  He's currently the head FIS coach at Rowmark.  

post #20 of 23

Completely nuts.

 

I'll drive if you want to do it again!

 

Then again...I wonder if the roof rack on my Cherokee will hold me...

post #21 of 23

Training with a Jag.  Amazing.

 

What's amazing is that you got it going long enough for that shot.

 

I had an XJS like that for a few weeks.        me   >  Beating_A_Dead_Horse_by_livius.gif  < The Jag

post #22 of 23

Uh...that's not me.

 

Jag? I can imagine the dead horse beating that went on.

Ever hear of Bob Norwood?

Stuffing a supercharged v8 in a Jag and having it work properly:

supercharged Jag-rolet

post #23 of 23
Any weather as even a bad day of ski racing is better than a good day at work..
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