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My first impressions of Dynastar Sultan 85, Line Prophet 90, Rossi S3, and some questions.

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Hi all. New to this site, so apologies if this is in the wrong place.

 

I'm looking for some new skis. I thought I'd share my demo experience so far, and ask for some guidance if anyone is inclined.

 

About me: 6", 160 lbs. without gear. Ski 90% ungroomed, about 50/50 bumps/trees. Love powder when I can get it. I'm an advanced skier, particularly in bumps, but don't like to go super fast.

 

I ski about 15 days/yr (would love to ski more). About 70% of my skiing is day trips to S VT, 20% trips to CO/UT, 10% N VT.

 

Because so much of my skiing is last minute day trips, I cherry pick the better days, so don't spend too much time on hard pack. As my kids age over the next few years, I expect my ski days will increase, but I will also have more runs on groomers and hard pack.

 

Currently I ski a Rossi B2 (174 CM), which I love in bumps, find OK in trees and chop, find really mediocre on anything remotely firm. I'm looking for something better in deeper snow and trees, and secondarily, with better edge grip.

 

I've tried the Dynastar Sultan 85 and Line Prophet 90 in conditions much firmer than my typical day. Skied the Rossi S3 on a lovely powder day. Here are my findings:

 

Dynastar Sultan 85 (172 CM):

 

Skied these on a dust on crust day with pockets of wind-blown powder. Performed fantastically and hardpack and in the deeper snow. Didn't even try trees as the thaw/freeze had made the snow ceramic. Did try them in some bumps, and got tossed around more than usual, but I'm not sure how much of this is because the bumps were so firm. Also, I had tweaked my back the day before, so I was a little tentative in bumps.

 

Line Prophet 90 (172 CM):

 

Tried these the next day. Conditions were still firm, but did find some softer packed powder bumps. I adored these skis on groomed hard pack and in PP bumps. I thought I might find the width cumbersome, but they seemed very nimble everywhere I tried them. They were as good as my B2s in bumps and much better at everything else I tried. I didn't get an opportunity to try them in trees or deeper snow.

 

Rossi S3 (178 CM):

 

Skied these in 7" of fresh snow. These were just awesome in soft bumps. In the woods, however, they were transformative. I can't overstate how much more aggressive lines through the trees I was able to take with these. I could pivot them with the slightest pressure, even in deep snow. Not sure why, but I could control my speed through much narrower corridors than I ever could with my B2s. I was finding fresh tracks all day because I could ski lines I would have never attempted on my B2s between the tracked out lanes. I kind of felt like everything was going by in slow motion. On groomed snow, they were just OK. Hard to describe, but they felt a little strange and sluggish, especially on gentle slopes, where it was a little cumbersome to change edges quickly. I'm not sure how much of this was because of the width and how much was the rocker. I expect that on steeper groomed slopes (hard to find in S VT), I wouldn't notice it as much.

 

Here are the questions I'm trying to answer. I know that I most of this I need to answer for myself by demoing more, but demoing is getting expensive and shops are starting to sell their demos. Any guidance is very much appreciated.

 

1) Should I still consider the Sultan 85? I suspect that my so-so experience with them in bumps was not representative, but I liked the P90 so much in bumps and groomers, I don't see the point of pursuing the Sultans unless they are likely to outshine the P90s off-piste. Are the Sultans likely to be better than the P90s in trees and deeper snow?

 

2) Should I be considering the Prophet Flite instead on the P90? I've read that the Flite is more flexible and livelier than the P90s, but doesn't give up too much on harder snow. They're cheaper, too. Given my skiing preferences (bumps, trees, deeper snow, not skiing fast), would the Flites probably be an even better match? Also, would a 179 CM be a better size?

 

3) Should I consider the Watea 84s? These seem great, but are hard to demo locally. Are they likely to be so much better for my than the above skis for me?

 

4) Here's the hardest question. What do I do about the S3? Could these (or something like them) be my everyday ski? Would they perform as well on a regular PP day, or would they only be much fun in fresh snow? I'm in a bind because I didn't get to try the Sultan 85 or P90 in trees, so I don't know if they would be much better than my B2s in trees, or if my epiphany on the S3s was unique to that style ski (98mm, double rise). I don't really have the budget for two pairs of skis, but I also can't live without skis that perform at least something like the S3s in those conditions. Would the Blizzard "The One" be a better fit?

 

By the way, many thanks to SierraJim, dawgcatching, BushwackerinPA, and many others for the reviews and advice. It's been extremely helpful in getting this far.

post #2 of 29

The One will give you a bit more groomed performance over the s3. Its really a fun everyday ski.  That said, I  would suggest the Sali Sentinel.  this is a superb ski and much overlooked. See my review fwiw. 

post #3 of 29

If you can truly cherry pick your days, I think the S3's are great.  I owned the P90's last year, along with a narrower carving ski. I found I almost always grabbed the P90's, even for firm EC days.  I replaced them for this season with the S3's, since I wanted something easier in the trees.  I find this season (except when out West), I almost always choose my narrower skis, unless there is fresh snow. Though, my narrower skis are Kastles now and they just rip.  If I could pick cherry pick my days, the S3's would be getting alot more use.

 

FWIW, I tuned my prophets 1/3 and the S3's I did the same on the cambered portion, which helps with the hardpack performance.

post #4 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post

If you can truly cherry pick your days, I think the S3's are great.  I owned the P90's last year, along with a narrower carving ski. I found I almost always grabbed the P90's, even for firm EC days.  I replaced them for this season with the S3's, since I wanted something easier in the trees.  I find this season (except when out West), I almost always choose my narrower skis, unless there is fresh snow. Though, my narrower skis are Kastles now and they just rip.  If I could pick cherry pick my days, the S3's would be getting alot more use.

 

FWIW, I tuned my prophets 1/3 and the S3's I did the same on the cambered portion, which helps with the hardpack performance.


I can be pretty selective for my day trips (of which I do 8-10 per year), but seven inches of fresh snow will still be the exception.  I typically don't go after a thaw/freeze until there has been a decent amount of new snow.  Typical conditions are mostly soft in the woods, but tracked out and moslty packed down.  Bump runs are usually pretty soft, but the troughs might be a bit scraped on some days.  Groomers are usually soft packed on the edges, but with firm snow in the high traffic areas.  In your experience, would the S3 be a good choice for these mostly soft but packed conditions, or do they only shine when there is several inches of fresh snow easily found?  Also, have you found that the S3s are significantly easier in the trees than the P90s?

 

Thanks so much for your input.  I've never experimented with tuning my own skis.  I really need to learn how to do that.

 

 

 

post #5 of 29

No question the S3's are easier in the trees.  When I was in Utah only brought the S3's and had no issues with their "firm" snow, but if it had been truly like EC ice, I would have kicked myself for not bringing another pair of skis.

 

From what I have read, you probaly should try out the ONE's just for some better groomer performance. Finding a true one quiver ski is always tough to do.  I am glad I'm down to 2 pair, as I used to have 3.  Some people here have as many skis in their quiver as you have in annual ski days.  Personally, I get maybe 20 days a season, and I'd like to use each ski more than a couple of times.  I also have never demoed any of the skis I have bought.  I have relied on reviews here and realskiers.com. Then I look for an end of season deal that won't cost me too much if I hate the skis and have to sell them.

post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sankaty View Post.

 

Here are the questions I'm trying to answer. I know that I most of this I need to answer for myself by demoing more, but demoing is getting expensive and shops are starting to sell their demos. Any guidance is very much appreciated.

 

1) Should I still consider the Sultan 85? I suspect that my so-so experience with them in bumps was not representative, but I liked the P90 so much in bumps and groomers, I don't see the point of pursuing the Sultans unless they are likely to outshine the P90s off-piste. Are the Sultans likely to be better than the P90s in trees and deeper snow?

 

No, probably not. Better to look at the Sultan 94 for a good comparison.

 

2) Should I be considering the Prophet Flite instead on the P90? I've read that the Flite is more flexible and livelier than the P90s, but doesn't give up too much on harder snow. They're cheaper, too. Given my skiing preferences (bumps, trees, deeper snow, not skiing fast), would the Flites probably be an even better match? Also, would a 179 CM be a better size?

 

I personally haven't skied the Flite.

 

3) Should I consider the Watea 84s? These seem great, but are hard to demo locally. Are they likely to be so much better for my than the above skis for me?

 

Watea 84's are likely better in soft snow than the Sultans.  They have a more even flex, aren't as stiff, and are really great in any off-piste condition.  Also, they ski quite light on the snow compared to what you were demoing. 

 

4) Here's the hardest question. What do I do about the S3? Could these (or something like them) be my everyday ski? Would they perform as well on a regular PP day, or would they only be much fun in fresh snow? I'm in a bind because I didn't get to try the Sultan 85 or P90 in trees, so I don't know if they would be much better than my B2s in trees, or if my epiphany on the S3s was unique to that style ski (98mm, double rise). I don't really have the budget for two pairs of skis, but I also can't live without skis that perform at least something like the S3s in those conditions. Would the Blizzard "The One" be a better fit?

 

The S3 could be an every day ski, but it depends on what you feel as "most important" in your skis.  They aren't grippy as some of the other skis, and are very mediocre on ice; get them into soft snow, and they are a whole lot of fun. Kind of odd in bumps. If you like that feel, but want something a bit more well rounded, The One from Blizzard is a great choice (grippier, a bit stiffer), the Watea 98 from Fischer is awesome in mixed conditions, the Spire from Elan is a very good all-around soft snow ski (more ski than the S3, more versatile as well).  Those are all mid-width all-mountain skis with a bit of tip and tail rocker, moderate overall flex.  The new Armada TST impressed me as a higher performance version of an S3-like ski.  If you like the bit stiffer feel, but still forgiving, of a P90, then perhaps the Kendo from Volkl is worth checking out; Sollie Sentinel, Elan Apex are a few really good ones. 

 

By the way, many thanks to SierraJim, dawgcatching, BushwackerinPA, and many others for the reviews and advice. It's been extremely helpful in getting this far.



 

post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

The One will give you a bit more groomed performance over the s3. Its really a fun everyday ski.  That said, I  would suggest the Sali Sentinel.  this is a superb ski and much overlooked. See my review fwiw. 



2nd the recommendation on the Sollie Sentinel.  Just a great do-it-all ski, a real skier's ski, as Kevin said.  Like a more forgiving, slightly wider Stockli XXXL.

post #8 of 29

sankaty, I think the ONE will fit all of your needs. I'm 6' 205 lbs, this year I have the P-90 in 179cm, the S3 in 186cm, and the ONE in 177cm in all the conditions you described in what you like to ski the ONE will out perform the others. I like the P-90 for groomers, hardpack and bumps, works well in the trees and some powder. The S3 is great in the trees as you have found, I think the 186 is too long for me in some steeper, tighter tree lines, loves the powder. Got on some scraped off boilerplate this past Sunday and they were not fun, wish I was on my Prophets. The ONE has shined in all areas, as you described your tree runs with the S3 the ONE will do even better, on groomers back to the lift they are easy to arc, short turns, long turns it doesn't matter on them. Bumps are quick and easy or do long gs type turns and air it out over some bumps and they absorb the mounds. Go out and get the ONE, I think dawgcatching is having a sale on them now get it in the 177 you won't go wrong.

post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post

sankaty, I think the ONE will fit all of your needs. I'm 6' 205 lbs, this year I have the P-90 in 179cm, the S3 in 186cm, and the ONE in 177cm in all the conditions you described in what you like to ski the ONE will out perform the others. I like the P-90 for groomers, hardpack and bumps, works well in the trees and some powder. The S3 is great in the trees as you have found, I think the 186 is too long for me in some steeper, tighter tree lines, loves the powder. Got on some scraped off boilerplate this past Sunday and they were not fun, wish I was on my Prophets. The ONE has shined in all areas, as you described your tree runs with the S3 the ONE will do even better, on groomers back to the lift they are easy to arc, short turns, long turns it doesn't matter on them. Bumps are quick and easy or do long gs type turns and air it out over some bumps and they absorb the mounds. Go out and get the ONE, I think dawgcatching is having a sale on them now get it in the 177 you won't go wrong.

 

Thanks!  Your decisiveness is just what I need to counter my chronic and pathological indecisiveness.  As you suggest, I'm starting to think that "the one" could be a good fit.

 

If, hypothetically, I were to end up with a two ski quiver, would the Watea 84 be a good compliment to "the one" considering my skiing preferences?  Stability at speed is not a priority, but would the Watea 84 be comparable to the P90 for edge hold on hard pack?  Would it at least be much better in this respect than my B2s?

 

 

post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sankaty View Post



 

If, hypothetically, I were to end up with a two ski quiver, would the Watea 84 be a good compliment to "the one" considering my skiing preferences?  Stability at speed is not a priority, but would the Watea 84 be comparable to the P90 for edge hold on hard pack?  Would it at least be much better in this respect than my B2s?

 

 


The One is equal to the S3 at everything the S3 is good at and better than the S3 in most areas where the S3 is only passable. Among the 98mm double rise skis, the One is..........uhhhhhh..............The One.

 

The Watea 84 is honestly obsolete except as a narrow soft snow ski. The Sultan 85 and Fischer Motive 84 are both better choices than the Watea where firmer snow is a consideration. The P-90 is quite good on firm snow for an AM Twin, however, it does not compete all that well against the Sultan or the Motive for those conditions except in bumps.

 

SJ

 

post #11 of 29
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post




The One is equal to the S3 at everything the S3 is good at and better than the S3 in most areas where the S3 is only passable. Among the 98mm double rise skis, the One is..........uhhhhhh..............The One.

 

The Watea 84 is honestly obsolete except as a narrow soft snow ski. The Sultan 85 and Fischer Motive 84 are both better choices than the Watea where firmer snow is a consideration. The P-90 is quite good on firm snow for an AM Twin, however, it does not compete all that well against the Sultan or the Motive for those conditions except in bumps.

 

SJ

 



SJ,

 

Thanks for the insight.  I've been reading reviews of the Watea 84, and coming to the conclusion that it might not complement something like the One so well as I'd end up with two skis that excelled in soft snow, but neither would be a great hard snow choice, considering the options.

 

So assuming I go with the One, I think I've narrowed down second ski options to the P90 and the Sultan 85.  The Motive 84 seems like a good choice, but it's more expensive, I haven't tried it, and I'm trying to narrow down my options.  I'm leaning toward the P90 because I preferred it in bumps (where I do lots of my skiing) and was very content with it on hard snow while demoing it.  I could be convinced to go with the Sultan instead if it would be better than the P90 in soft snow and trees, but from what I've heard so far, they should be comparable.  Agree?

 

It seems strange to have two skis separated by only 8mm at the waist, but I think they could complement each other pretty well for my purposes.  The One has a significant advantage in powder and trees; the P90 has a significant advantage on groomers and hard snow.  Where they overlap, soft but tracked out and bumped ungroomed snow, is where I do the majority of my skiing, which seems like not such a bad thing.  Carving high-speed railroad tracks on hard snow is just not in my repertoire, so it's OK that neither is designed for that.

 

You've mentioned in another thread that the Flite doesn't give up much to the P90 in terms of edge hold, but I'm guessing that in this context, the P90 makes more sense?

 

Oh, and I'd be wearing Euro Superlites with the P90/Sultan but Smartwool Ultra Lites with a rockered ski.  Ugh.  Should have mentioned that from the get go.  Sorry.

 

Snowbowler, I'm realizing I could end up with the same set up as you.  You seem happy with the combo, yes?

 

Thanks again to everyone for the input.  This has been incredibly helpful.

post #12 of 29

sankaty, I am enjoying both the Prophet and the ONE, I had bought the ONE for my son after he tried out my S3 and figured he would want his own pair of rockered skis.I have been using and liking the ONE better than the S3. My son went back to snowboarding mainly this year. His loss my gain. While there is some overlap between the Prophet and the ONE I think the ONE is great for most anything and if I had to do it again I would probably get a  more frontside oriented carver in the 78-84mm range, than the Prophet. I would need to do more research on what skis in that category to get. I have used a lot of the references on epic to sort out these new skis, mainly BWPA , he is right on with regards to how they ski. Also get great reviews from the likes of dawgcatching and sierrajim. They are all a excellent resource to go by.If you are going to get 2 skis start with the ONE then go from there and figure out what needs the ONE doesn't meet for you.

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post

....If you are going to get 2 skis start with the ONE then go from there and figure out what needs the ONE doesn't meet for you.


That's a good idea. I am currently skiing on The Crush (women's version of The One) and the Motive 84. I've only been on The Crush 5 days or so, but at this point I think I prefer it in the bumps to the Motive, which is kind of annoying, since that's half the reason I bought the Motive. (Caveat: this likely has a lot to do with the conditions on the days I used the skis ... on harder snow days, I bring out the Fischers, so the moguls themselves have been not as nice, soft, and even as they have been on the Blizzard days.) Anyway, I find it to be a really easy bump ski for its size. By the way, I'm on the 177, and I assume the women's version is just a bit softer than the men's? I don't know for certain.

 

THe only place I haven't liked (or loved) the Crush is on roads/cat tracks ... I don't think I've ever been on a squirrelier ski while trying to run it straight. Easily rectified by keeping on edge, but wow. And I haven't been in snow deeper than my boot tops, yet, either, but I'm not too concerned about that.

 

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

2nd the recommendation on the Sollie Sentinel.  Just a great do-it-all ski, a real skier's ski, as Kevin said.  Like a more forgiving, slightly wider Stockli XXXL.

 

FYI REI has the Sentinel in 177cm on sale for $329.93...

 

  http://www.spadout.com/p/salomon-sentinel-ski/

 

In case you don't know you can order from REI online, and have free delivery made to a nearby REI store for local pickup.

post #15 of 29

EPIC Bears, please consider asking our sponsors here like Dawg and SierraJim if they are interested in matching or considering the current closeout deals!  In some case they can't mtch but may be able to offer other deals and if nothing else, these folks are here standing behind thier products and services. Support your local community.

 

 

post #16 of 29



are you mounted center?  You could try giong a notch forward.

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post





That's a good idea. I am currently skiing on The Crush (women's version of The One) and the Motive 84. I've only been on The Crush 5 days or so, but at this point I think I prefer it in the bumps to the Motive, which is kind of annoying, since that's half the reason I bought the Motive. (Caveat: this likely has a lot to do with the conditions on the days I used the skis ... on harder snow days, I bring out the Fischers, so the moguls themselves have been not as nice, soft, and even as they have been on the Blizzard days.) Anyway, I find it to be a really easy bump ski for its size. By the way, I'm on the 177, and I assume the women's version is just a bit softer than the men's? I don't know for certain.

 

THe only place I haven't liked (or loved) the Crush is on roads/cat tracks ... I don't think I've ever been on a squirrelier ski while trying to run it straight. Easily rectified by keeping on edge, but wow. And I haven't been in snow deeper than my boot tops, yet, either, but I'm not too concerned about that.

 



 

post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post



are you mounted center?  You could try giong a notch forward.



 


Yes (you mean, center of the plate?). I don't want to go any farther forward, no way; I will probably try a notch back on a deep day. It really isn't a big deal, just wiggly.

 

post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

 

FYI REI has the Sentinel in 177cm on sale for $329.93...

 

  http://www.spadout.com/p/salomon-sentinel-ski/

 

In case you don't know you can order from REI online, and have free delivery made to a nearby REI store for local pickup.



Man, that's an awesome price.  I'm a bit worried that the Sentinel would be a bit stiffer than what I'm looking for.  Though I haven't skied the One, several folks who have skied the S3 and the One have found them to be similar, with an overall preference for the One.  While there are lot's of great reviews of the Sentinel, I don't have a sense how it would compare to the One/S3.  My experience on the S3 was so positive, I don't want to stray too far from that kind of ski.

post #19 of 29

Finndog, you are absolutely spot on. Folks, these guys give free advice,offer service that REI and others just can't provide, and depend on us diehard skiers to stay behind each other as support. And remember, some of these deals that look great on paper, do not always end up that way. Just my two cents.  Dave

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sankaty View Post


  While there are lot's of great reviews of the Sentinel, I don't have a sense how it would compare to the One/S3.  My experience on the S3 was so positive, I don't want to stray too far from that kind of ski.


The Sentinel is not in the same category as the S3/One. As usual in these things, you have to look past the width and consider the whole package. The 98mm double rise skis are definitely biased toward soft snow and are on the nimble/easygoing side of the stiffness equation. Given your intended usage, either of those are a better choice.

 

SJ

post #21 of 29

Agreed, the sentinel is stiffer and not as playful but an awesome ski. If the Bonafide wasn't coming out, i would be owning a pair. I currently own The One, and have skied the S3, so yes, the One and the S3 are much more softer and as Sierra said, very different skis than the Sentinel. For harder snow, tracked out, steeps, groomers and such I would say the Sentinel. If you want for soft snow, some powder, soft bumps more playful the One or the S3. I don't know who has what left over in the One's and S3's but I think that's where you are headed.   I thought the S3 was a fun ski; not all that different than the One on soft snow, maybe even a bit turnier than the One with the tapered tail.

post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 

Pulled the trigger on the One (177cm).  It's been a long time since I've purchased a ski without demoing it extensively first, so I'm a little jittery.  I'm optimistic that it will work out well, though.

 

Can't thank you all enough for the guidance.  I'll be sure to report back with my experience.

 

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post




Yes (you mean, center of the plate?). I don't want to go any farther forward, no way; I will probably try a notch back on a deep day. It really isn't a big deal, just wiggly.

 


I've had mine mounted at center , handling was ok, then I moved it 2 notches back more to the freeride side of the ski and really like the way it handles, not wiggly at all, but you do want to engage a little bit of edge

 

post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 

HI all,

 

If I'm considering a Line Prophet 90 as a harder snow ski, any thoughts about whether to go with the 172 or 179?  I tried and liked the 172, but most seem to recommend the 179 for my size.  If moguls are a priority, should I stick to the shorter size?

 

Thanks for any opinions.

post #25 of 29

Really unclear to me why if you just bought the One, you'd want the Prophet 90 for a hard snow ski in VT. Or even if you didn't just buy the One. Must be missing something here....

post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Really unclear to me why if you just bought the One, you'd want the Prophet 90 for a hard snow ski in VT. Or even if you didn't just buy the One. Must be missing something here....



It's much, much more likely that I'm missing something, but thanks for giving me the benefit of the doubt.

 

I don't plan to act on anything until I've skied the One (which should be tomorrow, if things go as planned), but from what I've gathered, the One will be a mediocre hard snow ski.  

 

Here's the logic for considering the P90s.  For the record, I haven't convinced anyone that it's a good idea yet. 

 

 

1) I've already skied the P90 on just about as firm a day as I'm likely to ski (the day after a refreeze at Sugarbush), and I liked it, so I know it will do the job, even if there might be something even better out there.  Other folks have generally good things to say about the P90 in hard snow (even if they're not the best), but I get the sense that you disagree.
 
2) Even my firm snow ski needs to be pretty good in bumps, or it will never get any use. This eliminates a lot of skis that would out perform the P90 on ice.
 
3) I'm looking for something inexpensive.  There are some skis that would probably be better options (the Motive 84 or some Kastle options, for example), but they typically go for significantly more. I would consider the Sultan 85, but the P90 is available for much less from what I've seen.
 
4) Although the One and the P90 are more different than just the width suggests, the significant overlap (medium-soft snow, bumps, and trees) describes my average day. The idea that I could grab the P90 on a day that I thought would be pretty firm, but not really wish I had my other skis if I found some softer snow, is pretty attractive to me.
 
All of my logic is predicated on the idea that the P90 will be much better on hard snow than the One.  If I'm wrong about this, and there's not really much daylight between the two, then I agree that it doesn't make any sense to own both.
 
When I got my B2s four years ago, I also got a narrow-waist (66mm) frontside ski, and I used them exactly once because I always preferred to be on something that could handle bumps or softer snow in case I found some.  If I found something that had more overlap with my soft snow ski, I think it would get a lot more use.
 
It's occuring to me that I should try to sell those frontside skis.
 
Edit:  Or maybe I should learn to love the frontside skis and be done with it.

Edited by sankaty - 3/9/11 at 12:13pm
post #27 of 29

Quote:

Originally Posted by sankaty View Post
...
It's occuring to me that I should try to sell those frontside skis.
 
Edit:  Or maybe I should learn to love the frontside skis and be done with it.

Frontside skis = rock skis

 

nothing wrong with 'frontside' skis, but their role as a key component for advanced skiers is becoming more diminished. And of course if you gottem, then there's no reason to not light em up whenever. However as seasons progress, and as more an more skiers go with stuff like 'The One' - if the conditions are anything other than skate rink hard, the new All Mtn skis will win out the day.

 

certainly out west, there's hardly any reason to go with a 'frontside' design, with so many other great designs which cover more bases.

I now have a bunch of really nice 'frontside' skis, more than I know what to do with. Thankfully there's Mt Baldy, here in So Cal, which gives a little taste of 'Back East' Rock & Ice (and I don;t mean climbin...)

Mt Baldy = Frontside skis - lets me save the good stuff for Mammoth and other western hills.

 

EC may take a little longer, but I think eventually the 'frontside' designation will also be seen as limiting.

 

'frontside' will prolly become another way of saying SL or GS race bds...

 

post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 

Just wanted to offer some first impressions of the Blizzard One after being on them for a couple of days:

 

Day one: 4" of fresh but dense snow at Killington (a fair amount of sleet mixed in) over a firm base.


They performed very well in these conditions. I didn't really appreciate how good they were until I switched back to full camber skis and found that the thick snow was a bit of a chore without the rocker. Switching back to the rockered skis was pure joy. I spent lots of time in the woods to skiers right of Superstar, and they really shined. On the steepest slopes, they could be overpowered a bit if I pushed too hard, but this was minor. Overall, they were very agile and predictable in what could have been demanding conditions.

Day two: Spring corn at Stratton

These are fantastic Spring skis. Turn initiation even in wet, lumpy, mashed potatoes was incredibly easy. I finally had a chance to try them in sustained bumps, and they were great.

I've been trying to compare them to the S3, but it's been hard because the conditions have been so different (I skied the S3s in 7" of perfect dry powder over a soft base). The Ones are definitely better on soft groomed snow (haven't tried either on hardpack), where they are quicker from edge to edge. Unlike the S3, I didn't really even notice the rocker on flat snow with the Ones. Both are good (and similar) in bumps. They also seemed similar, and very good, in trees. The S3s seemed a touch more effortless and nimble in trees, but so far I'm thinking that has more to do with snow conditions than the skis.

 

I've decided against getting the P90 to supplement the Ones. The Ones do well on soft groomed snow, so there is too much overlap for me. Also, I've really enjoyed the feel of a ski with a low rise tip rocker.  Next year, I expect that there could be a broad range of 84-88mm skis with a slight tip rocker.  Something in this range that's just a touch stiffer than the Ones could be a great companion.  We'll see.

 

By the way, Blizzard the One had got to be the most Google unfriendly ski name ever.

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sankaty View Post

Just wanted to offer some first impressions of the Blizzard One after being on them for a couple of days:

 

Day one: 4" of fresh but dense snow at Killington (a fair amount of sleet mixed in) over a firm base.


They performed very well in these conditions. I didn't really appreciate how good they were until I switched back to full camber skis and found that the thick snow was a bit of a chore without the rocker. Switching back to the rockered skis was pure joy. I spent lots of time in the woods to skiers right of Superstar, and they really shined. On the steepest slopes, they could be overpowered a bit if I pushed too hard, but this was minor. Overall, they were very agile and predictable in what could have been demanding conditions.

Day two: Spring corn at Stratton

These are fantastic Spring skis. Turn initiation even in wet, lumpy, mashed potatoes was incredibly easy. I finally had a chance to try them in sustained bumps, and they were great.

I've been trying to compare them to the S3, but it's been hard because the conditions have been so different (I skied the S3s in 7" of perfect dry powder over a soft base). The Ones are definitely better on soft groomed snow (haven't tried either on hardpack), where they are quicker from edge to edge. Unlike the S3, I didn't really even notice the rocker on flat snow with the Ones. Both are good (and similar) in bumps. They also seemed similar, and very good, in trees. The S3s seemed a touch more effortless and nimble in trees, but so far I'm thinking that has more to do with snow conditions than the skis.

 

I've decided against getting the P90 to supplement the Ones. The Ones do well on soft groomed snow, so there is too much overlap for me. Also, I've really enjoyed the feel of a ski with a low rise tip rocker.  Next year, I expect that there could be a broad range of 84-88mm skis with a slight tip rocker.  Something in this range that's just a touch stiffer than the Ones could be a great companion.  We'll see.

 

By the way, Blizzard the One had got to be the most Google unfriendly ski name ever.


Maybe BWPA will chime in but I think you will want to look into the Blizzard Bushwhacker ski for that. I was skiing with him on Thurs and he was on a pair and they had no speed limit. He seemed to like them a lot.

 

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