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Giant Calves and Wide foot boots

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I just started skiing this season and I'm really enjoying the sport. However the rental boot cut the blood circulation to my foot and pinch my calves so bad that I want to give up.

 

I have like a 20 - 21" calves which makes it extremely difficult to buy boots. I went to a local shop today and tried on a few, the Nordica Hot Rod 75 had the lowest cuffs but even with the links extended to the max you can see my calves hanging out and the tongue barely fits.

 

I can probably have the tongue issue resolved at a boot fitter but I need to start with a boot that doesn't hurt my calves. Would like some recommendation on starter boots that doesn't break. I measured 26.5 at the shop and that's the size I tried it. Without it buckled my toes were bent in but better once buckled. I was wearing a 27.5 rental boot over the weekend and they felt ok on the foot it's just the calves that were killing me is it alright to stick with a 27.5 or even go to a 28?  From where I am my only choice would be to shop online so I'd like to learn as much as I can b4 ordering.

post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannieboiz View Post
From where I am my only choice would be to shop online so I'd like to learn as much as I can b4 ordering.

Do you mean where you live?  Ordering boots online is absolutely not recommended.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum, read the wikis on terminology and fitting and check the list of fitters to see who might be near you.  If nobody is listed ask in the boot forum and state your problem.  You definitely need to deal with a fitter, unless of course you want to own a dozen boots that don't fit.
 

 

post #3 of 23


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dannieboiz View Post


I have like a 20 - 21" calves which makes it extremely difficult to buy boots.


 

I know the feeling.   Very well smile.gif

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dannieboiz View Post

 I was wearing a 27.5 rental boot over the weekend and they felt ok on the foot it's just the calves that were killing me is it alright to stick with a 27.5 or even go to a 28?

 

Depending on what model rental boot is being offered, You can try asking for:

 

1) strap extenders.    These fit onto rental boots where the cuff is done up with ratcheting straps like this:

 

Dalbello_MXR_ski_boots_mens_12.5_01a.jpg

 

2) womens' boots

 

 

Jumping into a 27.5 or a 28.5 is just begging for control issues, ankle flopping, heel blisters...

 

 

post #4 of 23
I've had good results with the Salomon Kaos. It has a 104-mm last, so it's just about perfect for the width of my feet. And, if I drop the spoiler down to the lowest setting and remove the optional padding for the calves, it leaves me enough room for a comfy fit up top.

On top of that, the top buckle can be repositioned farther in or farther out (3 separate mount points) to allow for skinnier or larger legs. So, with the optional padding removed and the buckle screwed in at the farthest point, they should offer enough space for pretty much anyone.

It's the first boot I've ever worn that didn't squeeze either my feet or my calves.
post #5 of 23

I have very wide feet and low calves.

After trying many boots with a great bootfitter I chose the Atomic B-Tech boots.

These boots are built on a 104mm last, the widest I know of.

They are also quite short so they didn't have to be cut in the back.

I have two pairs, one 90 flex and one 120 flex.

They still took some punching, canting and footbeds but they are perfect for those of us that have fins instead of feet!

post #6 of 23

I have the same issue, but I've found those big legs make for better skiing.

 

I just got a pair of Head Edge 9.5's and they are working out OK so far.  They have a 104mm last, and a fairly wide cuff without a spoiler, so some room for big calfs.  They also have an adjustable top buckle that extends 3 notches.

 

I worked with a bootfitter to arrive at these, but since they didn't have my size available, I ordered them online.

 

I think I still need a footbed, but they are OK as is.

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

I saw some other boots with a last of 105. I've been reading and reading and it seems the Tecnica Mega 8 is one of the few that may work. I plan on going to a boot fitter sometime this week to freak them out with my massive calves and put them up for a challenge. I'm just hoping that my available option won't break the bank cause this is one of the many items I need to buy for this sport. I rather spend it here than anywhere else.

post #8 of 23

My dad is a EEE and he is very happy with the Atomic fit. Rossignol has many models with a 104mm last.

 

Whatever you do, don't buy boots online.

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

The wide foot issue is the lease of my concern, the calves is what's killing me.

post #10 of 23

You can get some incremental relief by adding insoles which can help raise you inside the boot/liner - if your instep height allows it.

Superfeet Red insoles raise the heel area about 3/8 inch. If that's not enough you can add hard footboards under the insoles to raise a bit more.

it's not a total solution, but it can help get you up and have the boot wrap down the leg a bit lower.

post #11 of 23

Raising the heels only will increase your ramp angle sand is likely to put you in the backseat much of the time.

Find a good bootfitter and work with him to find the brand that comes closest to fitting you.

That is only a starting place.

Sounds like you have unusual enough anatomy to require extensive custom work.

I have spent as much on bootfiitting as the boots initially cost.

Comfort and performance in boots is where good skiing starts.

post #12 of 23

The Atomic LF 120 has been great for guys with big feet.  The live fit feature by Atomic looked gimmicky, but is really cool.  We've seen no problems with it and the mega cuff buckle hasn't broken yet on any that I've fit.  The last is something like ~104ish, but will accommodate a massive foot no sweat.

 

A burly power strap brings it all together.

RUTRATRA.jpg

 

 

 

post #13 of 23

"Those aren't calves they are cows". Nordica makes a rental boot with extra length adjustable upper buckles but i don't know if they offer the same adjustability in their non rental boots. Wedges under the heel is another possible solution.

post #14 of 23

Quote:

Originally Posted by dakine View Post

Raising the heels only will increase your ramp angle sand is likely to put you in the backseat much of the time.

Find a good bootfitter and work with him to find the brand that comes closest to fitting you.

That is only a starting place.

Sounds like you have unusual enough anatomy to require extensive custom work.

I have spent as much on bootfiitting as the boots initially cost.

Comfort and performance in boots is where good skiing starts.

certainly finding the 'best' match off-the-shelf is THE starting point.

my suggestion is not intended as probable total solution, in the OP's case; but it non-invasive, non-permanent, and can easily be tried in a good boot shop.

 

skiing on stock insoles is like having tissue paper between your foot and the foot board...

a lot of better boot shops already start you out with an Aftermarket footbed while trying on a boot.

Footloose at Mammoth was using Superfeet Red in ALL their boots (including demos) until this season, and seem to have switched to the Green - my guess to give a more 'stock' Off-The-Shelf feel to ramp angle...

Mountain Air Sports in SB and SLO 'promote' aftermarket footbeds heavily when they fit and sell boots. Commendable

That's what a good boot shop is all about...

 

The Reds being more 'structured', do 'change' ramp angle slightly.

However, the 'up' side is a more open angle to the foot, which allows more range in driving the boot upper.

If the bindings don;t have excessive delta, then the very small amount of increase shouldn;t have anyone going backseat, because of the insole...

 

I personally don;t notice any ski stance change or dynamics which isn't 'positive', going from stock tissue paper insoles to the Superfeet Reds. I tried the Greens, but they didn't quite do the trick for me. I need the firmer support and the slight additional height of the Reds.

 

It's a no-lose try-on option whicn costs nothing in the shop - assuming the shop has some structured aftermarket footbeds for sale.

if it doesn't seem to help, no harm no foul.

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by IslandSkier View Post

I have the same issue, but I've found those big legs make for better skiing.



I've found fat people come up with false justifications for their size.

I would know, I'm one of them.

 

 

(By fat I mean excessive muscular hypertrophy or, well, fat)

post #16 of 23

In my case, big calves arises from short legs (28" inseam).  But yeah, I'm fat too.

 

So that means a lower center of gravity, which I find helpful for carving on eastern ice.  I remember skiing off the Summit Quad at Whiteface down the old Olympic Downhill run.  It was gleaming with ice (where it earned the name Iceface) all the way down.  With my short fat build I was able to ski it all day, but my tall skinny friends were falling all over the place (and sliding down about 300' each time). 

 

I tend to look for nasty wind blown ice as a challenge...most others run away in fear.  Short/Fat helps that.  Not so much anywhere else!

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 

does the last have anything to do with your calves?

 

I went to a local boot fitter yesterday and he got me in a Nordica Hot Rod 75 with a 101cm last. He put something inside the sole to raise my foot up a little which seems to help. I feel less pain on the calves but I think they can be better.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannieboiz View Post

does the last have anything to do with your calves?

 

I went to a local boot fitter yesterday and he got me in a Nordica Hot Rod 75 with a 101cm last. He put something inside the sole to raise my foot up a little which seems to help. I feel less pain on the calves but I think they can be better.


Check out Daleboot.  They will custom build a boot to every aspect to your foot and calf...guaranteed to fit.  Intuition liners, slip on cants, custom insoles, shells individually customized to each foot and lower leg, etc.   See:  www.daleboot.com   If your foot and lower leg is that far different than "normal", you may want to go with a custom boot. 
 

 

post #19 of 23
Thread Starter 

that word custom scares me. 2 days into the sport and $1k for a boot? I'm already hurting to spend close to $400 on a boot. :(
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post




Check out Daleboot.  They will custom build a boot to every aspect to your foot and calf...guaranteed to fit.  Intuition liners, slip on cants, custom insoles, shells individually customized to each foot and lower leg, etc.   See:  www.daleboot.com   If your foot and lower leg is that far different than "normal", you may want to go with a custom boot. 
 

 



 

post #20 of 23

dannie,

 

Glad you are taking this seriously. You are right to spend so much time and effort on dialing in your boots - especially with calves like yours.  Something to think about is that you have your run of the mill "boot fitters" and then you have what I like to call "boot doctors". Boot fitters will get you in the right shell and can bake your liners etc. They might even be able to do a custom liner (something I would certainly think about - they are well worth the money).

 

Then you have true Boot Doctors. We have one here in Crested Butte named RB. Not only will he do custom liners and foot beds (he does sell boots as well) but he'll do things like replace your buckles with longer reaches, replacing tongues and grinding/warping plastic etc. Basically start swapping out parts. That really sounds like what you need. Where do you live? I imagine someone here on this board could point you to a boot doctor type within a few hours from you.

post #21 of 23
Thread Starter 

I'm in the SF Bay area. That sounds like a lot of trouble to go through. I better fall in love with this sport or else all time and $$ will be wasted. 

 

post #22 of 23
Ya it is but a great fitting pair of boots is heaven. Your problem is sort of chicken and the egg because of your calves. You can't develop any affinity to the sport if you are in constant pain. You'll have trouble finding a rental pair that will fit. I feel for ya. Sort of like ppl with bunions or unusally shaped feet. No easy way to get into the sport.

I'd just get a referral to a boot doctor type and go see him. He might be able to hook you up with Good Enough for the time being

One other thing: once you get a great fitting set of boots you will have them for a very long time. Someone wise on here once said something like you date skis, you marry boots.
post #23 of 23

You should have no problems finding a great boot fitter the next time you are in the northern part of Lake Tahoe.  Stop by the Start Haus and see what they can do. 

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