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All Mountain West Ski - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I haven't tried any of those, but reviews I've read suggest the S3 is better suited to higher speeds, and the Bridge more of an all-speed ski.  From your description of yourself I would say go for the S3.


When I demoed the S3, I found it was a play full ski that did really well at lower speeds. I didn't push it that hard, but I found most of the other skis I have been on this season (explosivs, shogun, thugs) better at speed.

 

The S3 is super fun, but I wouldn't call it a charger. 

 

 

For the record:

I purchased Shoguns this year. They are easy to ski, but they do like a big of speed. They are not burly compared to Explosivs or LPs, but they are solid enough, and more forgiving. 

post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk94 View Post



 

Hey Ghost, do you know which is a stiffer ski, the S3, or the Bridge? I believe they're quite similar but I'm not completely sure.  Also of the two which would perform best on hard pack snow?

 

Thanks again !
 


Can you demo? I am pretty sure that Ski Cellar has a demo line-up and they carry the S3. Ski West carries the Volkl line up - and they may do demos as well. Demos are really useful, especially for modern skis. The different shapes and construction materials mean there is a lot of variety out there. 

 

I decided to replace/upgrade my old Explosivs this year, and didn't really know where to start. I demoed Watea 94's, Proriders(last year's), Gotamas, S3s, and Shoguns. Certainly not an exhaustive list, and my choices were all over the map, but the demo process helped with my decision.

 

I hated the Gotamas (though they have a lot of positive reviews here...different strokes, right?) and I liked the rest of them. I found the Shoguns to be the best fit for me. I am happy with my decision. 

post #33 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by manchester81 View Post




Can you demo? I am pretty sure that Ski Cellar has a demo line-up and they carry the S3. Ski West carries the Volkl line up - and they may do demos as well. Demos are really useful, especially for modern skis. The different shapes and construction materials mean there is a lot of variety out there. 

 

I decided to replace/upgrade my old Explosivs this year, and didn't really know where to start. I demoed Watea 94's, Proriders(last year's), Gotamas, S3s, and Shoguns. Certainly not an exhaustive list, and my choices were all over the map, but the demo process helped with my decision.

 

I hated the Gotamas (though they have a lot of positive reviews here...different strokes, right?) and I liked the rest of them. I found the Shoguns to be the best fit for me. I am happy with my decision. 


Thanks, I could try Ski cellar to demo the S3's but I know that Ski West doesn't have any Bridges in the right size for me to test. I'm sure either of these ski's I'd like, but it's a hard decision between the two, in many ways their similar and others not so much.

 

Edit: It might also be quite difficult for me to find the proper demo size (168) for the S3's at Ski Cellar :/


Edited by tsk94 - 11/1/11 at 6:58pm
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post




The S3 is a fully rockered ski, 90 something waist. How is that suited to speed? 


The S3 is not a fully rockered ski.

post #35 of 59
Thread Starter 

Bump, any feedback on S3's and Bridges would be much appreciated guys!

post #36 of 59


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk94 View Post

Hey guys, this is my first time on the forum here so bare with me :P

 

I'm looking for a new pair of skies, all mountain west/one quiver ski and I would like your input and suggestions smile.gif.

 

Some possible skis I've narrowed it done to is the Volkl Bridge's and Head John 94's, I'm also considering some Rossignols or Salomons but unsure which one's would suit me well. I have some concerns with the Bridges though, I'm afraid they might be to much of a park ski, which is not what I'm looking for at all, and when it comes to the Head's I'm worried they are to slow of a turner ski for what I need, but other then that these ski's seem to suit what I want.

 

I want a ski that performs well in bumps, tree's, crud and some powder, but also be able to crave and hold a good edge on the groomers, like I mentioned something that performs well all around. EDIT: An agile ski, when it comes to bumps and tree's (even in the wider platforms), in an important aspect to me.

 

I'm a lightweight but I'm quite aggressive, so I would like a ski that has a little more of softer flex, but not something that within a season or two will be to soft for me.

 

As mentioned above I'm a lightweight, I'm 5'5, 16 y/o, and an advanced intermediate to advanced skier depending on the conditions, hopefully this also can help narrow down a ski right for me.

 

Lastly when it comes to length I'd like some advice with what would be best for me because of my lightweight, my ability level, and the all around conditions I want the ski for. I'm open to all suggestions and input on ski's and the one's I have mentioned.

 

I Hope my explanation of what I'm looking for was clear enough, if you have any question I'll try my best to answer them!

 

Thanks in advance!

 

TSK`



Dawgcatching is about your weight and really likes the Dynastar Sultan 94, it does have an upper speed limit but unless very high speed is your thing then all it's other attributes may fit your needs very well - do a search on Sultan 94 and you'll find it in the member gear review section. The MX88 is a very nice all around ski, I own it.

post #37 of 59

Actually Dawg is about 45 lbs heavier than TSK94, according to what they posted.  Mind you he does have a half decent price going right now on the Blizzard magnum 8.1.....(just in case you want to look at more options devil.gif )

EDIT wandering around on Dawg's site, I came across a very good deal on the 2011 Elan Apex...devil.gifdevil.gif.

"This is the prototypical do-everything ski: it handles groomers just like a big GS board, has very solid edge hold, is a rock star in crud at speed, has no real speed limit, is predictable in bumps, and has no real weaknesses. It isn't as exciting of a carver as the Legend 94 reviewed above, but is more stable in big arcs, and it feels lighter on the snow than another of my 90mm favorites, the MX88 from Kastle. The crud feel is smooth, stable, confident, and unshakable, but not burly or stiff like some." more..http://www.dawgcatching.com/ecommerce/control/product/~category_id=elanVP/~product_id=apexVP-11

post #38 of 59

I agree with 98grg2d. If you are near a Sportchek store, definitely check out the Rossignol S5 before they sell out. The S5 listed out at $599.00 at the start of the season, they are now being cleared out at $299.00 (skis only). The S5 has the look and feel of one of my favourite skis, the Dynastar Big Trouble. The S5 is 98 mm in the waist, very stiff in the mid section, with a softer tip and tail. If it's anything like the Big Trouble, it should make a great all mountain ski for the west. I have heard that the S3 is a great ski, but I don't see prices dropping as quickly as for non-rocker skis. The S3 is still priced at around $600.00 in my area (Vancouver, BC) . The question you need to answer is: Do I really need a rocker ski? If you can live without the rocker technology, you can save a lot of money by going with the S5, or maybe even the Dynastar Big (same ski as the older Big Trouble, just different graphics). The Big Trouble is my "go to" ski if I'm going to an unfamilar mountain, or conditions are unpredictable.

 

post #39 of 59

Not on your list but the price might tempt you.  94 in the waist, light fun playful ski.  

 

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/99958/fs-watea-94-186-cm-price-drop-to-299

 

Pics on the last post

post #40 of 59

Blizzi Atlas if you can find a deal on em since they aren't making em next year.  All around ski, slice, smash and blast.  Easy and fun.

post #41 of 59
Thread Starter 

Bump, what do you guys think about the Dynastar Sultan 94's or 85's?

 

Considering these ski's a lot because I think they'll suit me better then the Bridges or the Head 94's and the S3's.

 

To sum up what I want the ski I'm looking for; Agile and nimble for tree's and bumps, probably the most important aspect in the ski. Also be quick for short radius turns on the groomers while having good edge hold for GS turns. Dampness for crud and bumps and a wider platform for some powder, but still good for an everyday ski.

 

Thanks !


Edited by tsk94 - 3/10/11 at 8:00am
post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk94 View Post


 

To sum up what I want the ski I'm looking for; Agile and nimble for tree's and bumps, probably the most important aspect in the ski. Also be quick for short radius turns on the groomers while having good edge hold for GS turns. Dampness for crud and bumps and a wider platform for some powder, but still good for an everyday ski.


Gee.....you don't want much do Ya?

 

Both Sultans are great skis. The 85 is certainly quicker and more nimble for bumps while the 94 is better in crud/powder. Both have good enough edge grip with the 85 having the edge. The 94 is more damp.

 

SJ

 

post #43 of 59
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post




Gee.....you don't want much do Ya?

 

Both Sultans are great skis. The 85 is certainly quicker and more nimble for bumps while the 94 is better in crud/powder. Both have good enough edge grip with the 85 having the edge. The 94 is more damp.

 

SJ

 



Ya I'm basically looking for an all around ski, the way I phrased it made it sound a bit much so I apologize. But I would sacrafice some performance on hard pack for off piste conditions.

 

I think both of these ski's are in the right category for what I'm looking for, just unsure between the two. I read how the 85 is considered a 60 on piste / 40 off piste while the 95 is more of the opposite 40 on piste / 60 off piste. Between the two I'm not sure which would suit me best and what sacrifices I'd have to make between the two to choose which is best for me and what I'm looking for.

post #44 of 59

Sounds like the 94 is the ski for you. I live in Tahoe but would take a 94 anywhere in the West on short notice and not worry about it.

 

SJ

post #45 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

Sounds like the 94 is the ski for you. I live in Tahoe but would take a 94 anywhere in the West on short notice and not worry about it.

 

SJ


Ya I'm going to check the ski's out this weekend and possibly, *crosses fingers*, get a chance to demo them. Even if I don't get a chance they got good deals on the 85's and 94's so well see.

 

Thanks for the advice Jim !

 

post #46 of 59

Hi, I was in your shoes a month ago and finally settled on the Bridge.

 

I was off skis for almost 20 years becuase I switched to snowboarding as a teen. The bridge has been awesome. Very stable and easy to ski in most conditions. My 3rd day back (yesterday) I spend 5 hours on Whistler mtn blasting though deep chopped up powder, crusing on packed powder and even working my way down some steep moguled runs. While I don't have other skis to compare the bridge to, I have been able to improve rapidly and have a blast skiing on the Volkl's.

post #47 of 59

Did you end up picking something tsk94?

post #48 of 59
Thread Starter 

Not yet, I've reconsidered what ski's I'm looking at but still kind of unsure which direction I want to go with them. In a way I would want a wider ski, but I'm worried that for the ratio I spend on/off piste that the compromise might not be worth it. That being said it's probably about 50/50 - 60/40 Off-piste to on-piste. Thanks for checking in lol, and anyone suggestions or insight are greatly appreciated.

 

Edit: On top of the question of how wide of a ski, also rocker, if I want/need it for my application, and if so how much. Twin tip, possibly? But I think most likely I'd want a ski with camber underfoot to give me that edge grip and performance on harder, groomed snow. I might be wrong though, a rockered ski might work, but I'm not sure.

post #49 of 59

I spent a week on wider skis in Utah recently.  I have been a dyed-in-the-wool narrow carver eastern skier. 

I was stunned at how well some of the wide skis held and skied on harder, groomed snow.  I liked the Blizzard Magnum 8.1 (81 underfoot), the Nordica Burner (84) and especially the Volkl Bridge (92).  If you are skiing out west and want to ski anything off-piste, I'd go wider than my previous prejudices would have thought.  These skis won't have the absolute quickness of a narrow carver...but you'll get a whole lot more upside in most other conditions without regretting any loss on the groomed. 

post #50 of 59
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the response. The only really wide ski's you test IMO, were the Bridges, and I've been looking at some that are even wider underfoot (98mm). It probably wouldn't change it to much but still. Like you said they would well on the groomed snow, even in comparison to narrowing craving ski's, I'm just not sold on they'd perform well enough for what I'm looking for.

post #51 of 59
Have you been able to demo anything yet?

Width will depend on what you feel comfortable putting on edge on hard snow and this really depends on your technique and strength and to an extent your aggressiveness when conditions aren't ideal. Next you're in fernie see if you can demo line prophet 90 and 100s in the same length. That should give you a feel for how performance changes with width only. Not that those might be skis you like but you should be able to understand the difference better while changing the fewest variables. Maybe do a high performance rental where you can change your skis as often as you like to try a bunch of skis. Try some friends skis if possible.

IMO when I think of an ideal one ski quiver I tend to think sidecut for groomers, flex and width for snow conditions and skiing style. Twin tips and rocker are preferences although you eliminate a lot of options if you don't want a twin. Rocker may or may not change the performance compared to another ski since different flex can't provide a lot of the same benefits/compromises, which is where demoing comes in.

A good example of this is soft twins like the s5 where the tip and tail are soft enough that they really don't produce much grip within 20 cm of the tip/tail, flex over 3d snow easily. The rocker on the s3 is really meant to do the same things but does it through shape rather than flex.
post #52 of 59
Thread Starter 

The only ski I've had to demo are the Head Peak 88's. It's wasn't a bad ski overall, but I think what ruined the ski to me was the extremely soft tip in comparison to a stiff tail. The back of the ski would get grip but the front couldn't hold a edge at all and as a result chattered a lot at speed when carving on harder snow. The width at 88mm under foot didn't seem to bother me at all, I'm sure I could be comfortable on something a bit wider also. The only other ski's I've have a chance to try are my dad's Volkl Grizzly's, we have the same boot size so we swapped ski's. He said he found the same thing as I did with the Head, minimal grip on hard snow, not bad in softer snow conditions, but the tip was way to soft. As for the Grizzly's i liked these ski's a lot more, they were really stable, stiffer all around, although it was more of even stiffness throughout the ski. They held an edge a lot better then the Head's, I found them to be quick turning, fairly easy to initiate, quick edge to edge for ~90mm underfoot, but overall a pretty demanding ski, and not very lively either.

 

So I know something a bit wider wouldn't be a problem but I'm for sure looking at sub 100mm, or 100 on the dot. But the main thing is I want a ski that can also crave and hold edge on groomers, unlike the Head. So I've got some idea's for ski's but not entirely sure. Some I've been looking at are the Nordica Enforcer, Volkl Mantra (2012), next years Blizzard Bonafides, Volkl Bridge's, and the LP 90/100's.

 

Any thought on these ski's or suggestions on others would be great :).


Edited by tsk94 - 3/27/11 at 6:07pm
post #53 of 59

Look at the Atomic Access. Competetively priced, and much higher calibre than the price suggests.

 

 

post #54 of 59
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply Betaracer, I've looked into the Access' but just for worried from what I read that it doesn't perform as well on the groomers. Nevertheless I'll read more into it.

 

Thanks !

post #55 of 59

I recently bought the Prophet 90's, and love them. I was looking for something better in the bumps, tight trees, and crud, than the race type skis I am usually on.

 

My home hill is basically ice, and out of the shop, they were pretty scary. But after putting a good race tune( I'm a coach) on them, they are pretty awesome on the hardpack too!

 

Our head coach was following me down the hill a few weeks back, and skied into the lift line, just staring at my feet. He had a funny look on his face, and said" man, those twin tips can turn!!!".

It was hilarious!

 

So far I've skied them on ice, icy moguls, slush and slush with 2-3" of fresh on top, they have been great in all. Can't wait to get them out west next week!

I had also looked at the Fujas, but thought they would be a bit softer, and less useful for my needs(ice). I think if I was somewhere with real snow, I would have probably gone with P-100's.

 

FWIW, I'm 5'7" and about 165 lbs. At your weight, maybe the Prophet Flites would be a consideration.

 

 

Brudog

post #56 of 59

Tsk94,

 

Going way back to the start of this thread, I see that you are looking for a ski that can carve, will hold a good edge on groomers, is agile, has a little more of a softer flex, and will work in all conditions for a lightweight advanced intermediate skier.

 

A ski that comes to mind is the Atomic Panic. I purchased a pair last month and have had them out on the slopes only once this season, but I was really impressed with the light and lively nature of the ski. I'm more of a finesse skier than a hard charger, so the Panic checked off all the right boxes for me. I would recommend the Panic for a lighter skier who wants an all-round twin-tip. It's definitely not a big mountain crud-busting machine, but I don't think that's what you are looking for, or what you need. The Panic has the right amount of flex to be lively without being too demanding. It's very forgiving, is easy to turn, and the 87mm waist adds stability in moderately deep stuff. Just a nice balance of features. The 173cm length would be best for a skier of your size and weight. If the Panic seems a bit too narrow (these days it's go wide or go home), the Panic's big brother, the Access, will get the job done with it's 100mm waist. Lots of positive reviews on that one.   

post #57 of 59

 Elan Olympus? Maybe a tad more under that you want, but its not a bad think in this case.

post #58 of 59

I skied Rossignol S86 Freerides this year out West, mainly in Utah, and loved them.  Found they adapted to variable conditions really well and were a very versatile all-mountain ski.  I don't hit snow parks at all though.

 

 

post #59 of 59

From your description and everyone else's opinions it looks like about a 94 waist is what your looking for. I'd go with the Watea 94s or at least check them out if you have the chance. This is my daily ski and I couldn't be happier with it. It's quick turning, more so than any other ski I've tried (however, my experience with different skis is limited so don't buy them based only on this), but they are also great at big GS style turns at high speeds. I go from quick turns in tight trees to huge turns across a groomer and don't notice any change in performance at all. They're wide enough to be a fairly good powder ski, but also narrow enough to be IMO one of the best all-mountain skis out there. Overall it's a really fun ski that I feel confident on in any conditions at any speed. I've found some good reviews/recommendations of the Wateas on here so look around.

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