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12 feet of snow???

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

While listening to the news today they mentioned how some areas out west got as much as 12' of snow.....as a lifelong NY'er, aside from photos, that amount of snow seems hard to grasp.   While I am no stranger to snow storms and welcome them, 12' seems like an end of the world scenario....I mean we get a foot and all of metro NY is crippled.   If we got 12' I think they would just write us off.   So for you experiencing this share what you know and see:

post #2 of 24

First and foremost, areas like this are accustomed to getting that kind of snow a few times a year so the road clearing crews are prepared to handle it.

Second, we load up our 4X4's and head out to help the snow reach its potential

 

Tahoe Monster - RAWR

post #3 of 24

Food for thought.

 

Tropical storm Allison dropped 42'' of rain where I was near Houston.

 

Wetter snow that could mean 420'' or 35 feet of snow.

 

Very dry powder that could be 2100''  or 175 feet of snow.

 

That would be under 48 hours, you cannot comprehend what it's  like to have that much water falling from the sky.

 

 

One area saw almost 30'' in 10 hours.

(Think 30-150'' snow per hour)

post #4 of 24

Just make sure you have the 15' powder cords when you come West! tongue.gif

post #5 of 24

How about 12 feet - on the ground!! Notice the appropriate vehicles with studded snow tires. Snowmobiles hidden behind the right side snow bank.

 

Adamhouse%2012%27%20snow.JPG

post #6 of 24

I still remember my first trip to Timberline on Mt. Hood.  I'd lived in Switzerland and Colorado, and had seen some pretty big dumps, but nothing prepared me for the drive up.  The walls of snow just got higher and higher.  The entrance to the lodge was through a giant pipe and the first and some second floor windows just showed layers of snow with a dull glow.

 

We're looking for another four feet in the next couple of days.

post #7 of 24

Carson spur just west of Kirkwood

183861_10150097918569070_786854069_5889768_4811255_n.jpg

 

Storms like this don't happen every year, but it is something people are prepared for.

 

JF

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post

How about 12 feet - on the ground!! Notice the appropriate vehicles with studded snow tires. Snowmobiles hidden behind the right side snow bank.

 

Adamhouse%2012%27%20snow.JPG


12' on the ground is not a deep snowpack. We're at 174", which is average. The deepest we've had was 366".

post #9 of 24

Got four feet at my house last week.

 

If the weather boys are right, I'm due for another three feet by Saturday.

 

Now mind you, I live at elevation 4000 feet.

 

Too much of a good thing IMO. The irony of it all is that I missed two ski days due to the last storm and will again miss a day or two due to TOO MUCH SNOW!

 

Where is global warming when you need it!hissyfit.gif

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post

Too much of a good thing IMO. The irony of it all is that I missed two ski days due to the last storm and will again miss a day or two due to TOO MUCH SNOW!

 

Want to trade places? In NJ I get to miss skiing when we get 6" and they call for a state of emergency.

post #11 of 24

I skied Pan Dome on Thanksgiving 1998 with a 98" base, that was the world record year for most sonwfall, and my first time to Mt Baker...

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/news/1999/wsnorcrd.htm 

 

I'll post some pictures tonight of Mt Hood Meadows record year, (3 seasons ago?) when they received 750"+ that year.

Quote:

Originally Posted by iWill View Post




12' on the ground is not a deep snowpack. We're at 174", which is average. The deepest we've had was 366".

post #12 of 24

Mt. Washington about 4 weeks ago - this is the edge of the parking lot.

 

Mt Washington, on Vancouver Island, not in NH.  ;)

 

As might be expected of course, the day I was there, it had not snowed for a week, and the high temps and cold nights had turn everything quite icy.  Oh well, a bad day skiing is still better than a good day in the office.

 

MtWash3.JPG

post #13 of 24

alpine meadows total snowfall for the year 504"

 

base depth 206"

 

The OP was referring to the 12 feet of fresh last week.

 

Not too mention the 2 feet last night and 2-3 more forecast by tomorrow morning.

 

And another go 'round starting up wednesday into the following the weekend.

 

Not just 144" on the ground

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post




12' on the ground is not a deep snowpack. We're at 174", which is average. The deepest we've had was 366".

post #14 of 24


I was replying to a post referencing a 12' snowpack, not the OP.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post

alpine meadows total snowfall for the year 504"

 

base depth 206"

 

The OP was referring to the 12 feet of fresh last week.

 

Not too mention the 2 feet last night and 2-3 more forecast by tomorrow morning.

 

And another go 'round starting up wednesday into the following the weekend.

 

Not just 144" on the ground

 


 
post #15 of 24

This in the end of March at the lower (lowest elevation) lot at MHM. In what time frame and what area got 12 feet of snow? Govy got 4 feet in 2 days about 8 years ago...big dumps and snowpacks of 15+ feet are common in the Cascades and Sierra's.

ll[p[k[pl[plIMG_0074.JPG

IMG_0079.JPG

post #16 of 24

The East Coast Equivalent to all these West Coast photos being posted...

 

East Coast Snow Bank

 

I really need to move west..

post #17 of 24
post #18 of 24

I've had season passes or discount cards for Kirkwood many seasons over the last 3 decades.  The resort is between 7800 and 9800 feet in elevation.   State route 88 accesses that resort which is about 30 miles southwest of Lake Tahoe.  During winter SR88 contains the longest stretch (few dozen miles) of open highway above 5000 feet in elevation in California that is the approximate average snow level for Sierra winter storms.    Note snow levels vary greatly from storm to storm and every year there are periods when snow is piled up beside the highway down to below 2000 feet although even then one usually needs to climb to 5000 feet for the snow to be at car top height.  Now during periods in which snow beside roads is really deep for long distances that happens a few times each decade,  a particularly amazing experience is to wait until the last big storm has ended and the road has been well cleared.  Then drive that highway west to east at say 9pm in the evening on other than a Friday or Saturday night when a small following post frontal storm has just deposited an inch or three and has essentially stopped.   In other words on a safe midweek night when there are going to be few other vehicles on the road, and road conditions are R2 that means 4wd with mud & snow tires don't need to chain up.   

 

Although Caltrans will continuously plow the highway, some areas are bound to have a thin layer of snow and ice as long as temps are below freezing.   Much of the road has vertical sides of snow due to the way snow plows cut through and blow snow out over road sides like in the above Carson Spur image although that is always the deepest section.   With one's high beams on, light reflects on all the white walls ahead and on the road surface, so light is amazingly bright ahead for a long distance.  The effect is like driving in a white tunnel with a dark ceiling.   During R2 conditions speed limits are 30mph (although most of us 4wd'ers fudge that a wee bit in the straights) so one is just tooling along at a modest relaxed speed to enjoy the experience.  I've often thought someone could make a rather interesting professionally marketed comsumer video lasting at least a half hour in such conditions midweek.  A fancy lead car, say a cherry red AWD sedan with tunes playing, was a couple hundred or so feet in front of a filming vehicle.    Might even be part of some short comedy feature with a TBD plot including powder hounds in the sedan going up to Kirkwood for the next morning.   Then some shots the next morning raging over cornice areas and down its many famous chutes etc.  

post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 

When you have that amount of snow....is there any chance of it melting by next winter?   I remember a few years ago the sanitation had made a pile of snow that must have been about 20' high....it lasted through the whole summer and through most of the fall.  We finally had several days of warm rain and that last bit melted away, but that was just one pile.  It was funny seeing the kids throwing snow/ice/slush balls at each other in NYC wearing shorts and t-shirts.

post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by k2skier View Post

http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?site=pqr&smap=1&textField1=45.346&textField2=-121.673 

 

 

Drool! 5 feet in 3 days...


Already took Tuesday off. First chair at Meadows, and Ski Bowl are in my future.

post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

When you have that amount of snow....is there any chance of it melting by next winter?   I remember a few years ago the sanitation had made a pile of snow that must have been about 20' high....it lasted through the whole summer and through most of the fall.  



 

 It will melt. Mostly. Not a big deal except for us hikers. Trails covered. That sort of thing. Trails usually open in June still covered in July

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post

 It will melt. Mostly. Not a big deal except for us hikers. Trails covered. That sort of thing. Trails usually open in June still covered in July


Yup, it sucks for early summer MTBing but it is great for late spring ski touring.  Of course, if it melts too fast it can cause flooding in the valleys.

 

Some snowfields will remain till the first snows of fall in a year like this.  Dookie, who used to post here takes advantage of skiing those patches all summer.

JF

post #23 of 24

Is it possible to have powder so deep that even sinking feet first will bury/suffocate you?  I was at Kirkwood last week (before the additional 60" they got this week) and crashes in the powder were pretty tough to dig out of.  I'm wondering if there can be so much powder it's impossible to get out... or if it naturally packs itself from the weight of what's on top, so even with the extra 60" today, it wouldn't seem any worse than what I experienced last week...

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post


Yup, it sucks for early summer MTBing but it is great for late spring ski touring.  Of course, if it melts too fast it can cause flooding in the valleys.

 

Some snowfields will remain till the first snows of fall in a year like this.  Dookie, who used to post here takes advantage of skiing those patches all summer.

JF

Yea, some of my favorite MTBing areas are under six feet of snow. Mid-elevation stuff. Trails that will still be covered in late May. I hate it when there is a month plus gap between the end of ski resort season and when I can ride the local trails.

 

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