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Kastle MX108 + BMX108 full length review (with pictures) 2011 and 2012 models - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisCrash View Post

Buzz, maybe maybe not but thx. I suspect your right 100mm is likely better for most as a Western daily driver but like anything that leaves other gaps to be filled. Bigger for powder and narrow for frontside, or between storm skiing. If I went with a three ski quiver I'd probably go something like 78 - 98 - 118+, others might add or subtract a few mm based on weight, size and preference.

110 or so seems to be a sweet spot for a few guys around my size in that it is a really good if not ideal powder skiing and good soft conditions daily driver without giving up much at either end. 100mm for me not so much, as it gives up too much in deeper snow. 120 ish not nimble enough in marginal conditions.

Tip rocker (and tail) has made many a ski quicker and more manageable in a bigger widths and lengths. Case and point the first gen MX108 would not have been on my daily driver list.


Yeah, that is how I see it too. Good quiver call; high 70's for hard snow, something in the middle for variable conditions (ski flex and characteristics are more important here than width), and a wider ski for soft snow. 

 

 

 

post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisCrash View Post

Tip rocker (and tail) has made many a ski quicker and more manageable in a bigger widths and lengths. 


You can also turn it around; rocker has made many a narrower ski easier to plane up, come around in soft snow. In some ways I think as they get rocker and flex worked out, for many of us it may spell the end of the need for 115+ widths. Yep, a 118 rockered ski will definitely be easier to handle than a traditional camber 118, but neither one will get from one edge to the other any faster cuz that's still the same lever arm. If I can get up and over chop because of the shape and flex, why not go for something that'll also handle bumps and steeps where you may need to do stuff in a hurry?

 

post #33 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post


You can also turn it around; rocker has made many a narrower ski easier to plane up, come around in soft snow. In some ways I think as they get rocker and flex worked out, for many of us it may spell the end of the need for 115+ widths. Yep, a 118 rockered ski will definitely be easier to handle than a traditional camber 118, but neither one will get from one edge to the other any faster cuz that's still the same lever arm. If I can get up and over chop because of the shape and flex, why not go for something that'll also handle bumps and steeps where you may need to do stuff in a hurry?

 

Good call.  I find that as long as the tip can get "out" of the snow for releasing, I don't need much in the way of width.  My recent experience of the Magnum 8.5ti handling 12" of moderate crud quite a bit better than the Cochise plays this out: both got out of the snow well enough, but the 8.5ti was narrow enough to be much quicker and more powerful when I needed the ski to bite, or to flow over bumps forming up.  This year, the widest ski I have been skiing with any consistency is my BMX98.  If we got a really heavy, wet dump, I would want something wider, but for typical tree skiing and moderate density, moderate depth new snow we get, I find I favor the slightly narrower skis. Much less work for me to do.  There are also those that can't make a turn in a foot of snow on anything less than 120mm, but I assume we are talking about reasonably skilled skiers here.   
 

 

post #34 of 43

BMX108, been out on them 4-5 days now. First few in 5-8 inches on new over med firm base then most recently on med firm groomers.

 

In the 5-8 inches over med firm base they were fantastic, powerful, quick and very predictable in varying terrain and lighting conditions. Skiing a ski especially a one new to me in poor to mixed light in challenging conditions I really appreciated this ski. Almost as forgiving as my olympus but with more power and better fore and aft balance, I think my 183 Olympus was too short and and soft (the tips are butter) for me at my weight the BMX108 in 188 is a better length / flex match. Not quite as telepathic in terms of turn initiation or as easy at slow speeds but they had more going on for me at most speeds I ski. In the limited tree's I took them in I had to work a bit harder on them but they were very good and would carve or smear as I wanted.

 

My last outing was on firm groomers at Sunpeaks. Frankly, I was bored of ripping carpets on my MX78's which were arguably perfect for the conditions. While I wouldn't want to ski these conditions everyday on a ski this width they were a heck of a lot of fun and I had no problems making any turn shape I wanted on firm snow. Edge hold was fine with some chatter on really hard snow. Stability was again fantastic and I was usually looking over my shoulder trying to find whoever I was skiing with...I even tucked headwall with them and at 100kph all I had was a great big grin on my face. 

 

Talking to my dealer and those in Sunpeaks one thing that seems to get a number of heads stuck is how to sell the BMX line is the sidecut or lack there of especially if they themselves have not skied them. I think this point is overweighted by many and if your skied the 98 or 108 in anything soft or have a ski for firm snow the point is almost mute. Be curious what Beyond and Dawg think about this? Is Kastle on point here or are they missing something? Is the one ski quiver notion polluting many skis?

 

post #35 of 43

100 kmh is booking on 108 mm skis. If I follow your last comment/question, it's about how to market skis like the 98 or 108 in terms of their sidecut? I don't consider their sidecut weird, pretty normal for a traditional ski with a bit of early rise. Or about a comparo of the 98 and 108? FWIW Dawg has provided that over in the gear reviews forum; many here see the 108 as a scaled up 98, but IMO they're kinda different.

 

 

post #36 of 43

Beyond, I don't consider the sidecut weird either or a drawback, I mentioned it largely because the last few conversations I had at  newer Kastle dealers brought out concern that the BMX's versatility must be compromised by the lack of sidecut. I think many are comparing these skis now to S3,S7, Atomic Blogs etc that have more sidecut and many dual rocker. They were surprised with my feedback about how quick and versatile I found the 108's. I said they should should a) ski them and b) remember there soft snow biased skis and most buying at least a 108 will have another ski for groomers etc.

I two find the 98 and 108 to be quite different especially at my weight, the 98 is not a new snow ski for more than 6inches or so of snow. I also perhaps strangely find the 188 BMX108 easier to ski than the 188 BMX98. I'd love a BMX98 in a 183 or so but will likely be buying a184 LX92 or FX94 next season. 

post #37 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisCrash View Post

 I think many are comparing these skis now to S3,S7, Atomic Blogs


Way different skis, for sure, targeted toward different skiers.  The BMX108 skis "loose" enough for scrubing speed, without losing power and precision.  That is a certain feel that some skis (definitely the S3) doesn't have, and the S7 doesn't have much of it (the Super is more oriented toward the Kastle feel). The BMX108 is more along the lines of a Cochise: relatively easy to ski, but not swimming around in the tail end; more of a tail that releases down the hill, and is less tolearant of poor technique. Comparing it to the Surface ski we tried recently, it was definitely a more precision oriented ski, but also more rewarding.  A really crappy skier could enjoy the Surface in deep snow (all you have to do is stand up and push it around to get it to turn), but it gave nothing back either.  Someone with solid technique would be happier on a ski like the 108 than someone without. 

post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisCrash View Post

Beyond, I don't consider the sidecut weird either or a drawback, I mentioned it largely because the last few conversations I had at  newer Kastle dealers brought out concern that the BMX's versatility must be compromised by the lack of sidecut......



Wierd, my personal journey has been the opposite.  Around seven years ago I was mainly skiing Volkls, the AC3 and AC4.  The AC4 (Red second generation) in particular was a stiff, high side cut ski. Somehow I got to ski on some Stockli Stormrider XLs and they were a revalation to me.  And the major differences were lack of sidecut and progressive flex; the straighter ski was far more versatile in allowing turns to be slarved while the progressive flex allowed the skis to be carved.  Sometimes I hop on the AC3s, which I kept as rock hoppers and am reminded why I dislike high side cut skis (the exceptions being my race skis).

 

post #39 of 43

Hey Taxman,

Actually agree with you so maybe you might have taken my comment out of context. I too am in the same boat and moved from high sidecut skis to skis with less sidecut and more progressive flex. I'll admit the 32m sidecut on the BMX surprised me but I knew I wanted to demo them, once I did no more issue. I am finding them quicker, more responsive and more stable than all my previous ~110mm skis. 

post #40 of 43

Late night comprehension skills (or lack thereof redface.gif). IIR, the comment in response to your shop dude who didn't have a clue.

post #41 of 43

After skiing the BMX108 once I was hooked (and yes at Surprised at their capability given their apparent lack of sidecut). Turn shapes of any variety and ability to do really snappy turns - surprising given their girth, and, as mentioned, ability top go stupid-fast without concern (yikes, what's my din set at?).

 

My Whistler quiver's gone from 4 skis to only the MX88 and BMX108  and don't feel like I've lost anything.

post #42 of 43

I've been skiing the BMX108 the last couple of days in a 188. I think I am falling in love. Anybody have an opinion on it vs the BMX118? I'm kinda thinking about buying the BMX118 in a 183.

post #43 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

I've been skiing the BMX108 the last couple of days in a 188. I think I am falling in love. Anybody have an opinion on it vs the BMX118? I'm kinda thinking about buying the BMX118 in a 183.

I have a 118 in 183cm.  Even more stable than the 108 given the shorter length, a little more nimble, probably due to the increased running surface. I like the length better for me: it is quicker to load up the tip, feels more nimble in the trees.

 

I haven't skied it much this year, we have rarely had much new snow. One big storm cycle, and almost nothing since then.  With that said, it feels like a giant carver on hard snow, isn't too tough to ski at all.  Very direct and powerful. 

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