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Getting drip stains out of ski jackets

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Does anyone have suggestions for getting what I think are greasy stains out of ski jackets? We were at Bretton Woods this weekend, and apparently this was a big problem -- I noticed a sign up at customer service about how they could not be held responsible for drip stains on jackets as this is a normal consequence when the weather warms up and things start thawing. Might be convincing if it weren't in the single digits there this weekend.....without the wind chill. Anyway, any suggestions?

 

I searched the forum and found a recommendation from back in 2003 to put WD40 on the jacket and then extract the solvent with a vacuum cleaner before washing. I'm not doing that. Any other ideas? Anyone tried the dry cleaner for stains like that? I know that sometimes you can set a stain in by washing it with the wrong stuff. We both have new ski jackets, of course, and I'm not putting WD40 on mine!

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 17

Simple Green

post #3 of 17

Goo Gone?

post #4 of 17

From Patagonia's website

 

Stain Removal

To get grease out of a technical jacket, dampen the stain and rub in dishwashing detergent. Then wash the jacket in warm water with plenty of mild powder laundry soap. If the stain persists, sponge it with a safe cleaning fluid (Renuzit® or Carbona®) or mineral spirits; you can find both at your local grocery store.

To get gum or sap out of a garment, first freeze the sap with some ice, then use a dull butter knife to scrape off as much as you can. Next, soak the garment in a water/white-vinegar solution, and throw it into the laundry with warm water and detergent.

For help with other stains, please feel free to Contact Us.

 

I used Mineral Spirits on a very light colored green Patagonia shell and it got most of the dark grease stain out. Not perfect but much lighter. Test on a small non-visible area first.

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

That's great info, thanks!

post #6 of 17

I've had great luck with rubbing on Spray & Wash Stain Stick first, letting it sit for a minute or two, then scrubbing Shout Gel in over top. Let that sit another couple of minutes, then machine wash in cold and it almost always comes out completely.

post #7 of 17

They are never the same after you wash them.

Dirt is natural and organic, it gives your jacket character.

If for some reason you actually have to wash it....Scotchguard is your friend.

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

They are never the same after you wash them.

Dirt is natural and organic, it gives your jacket character.

If for some reason you actually have to wash it....Scotchguard is your friend.



They are the same if you wash in a proper DWR finish like TX Direct. Forget scotchguard.

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post





They are the same if you wash in a proper DWR finish like TX Direct. Forget scotchguard.


Tell me about this TX direct stuff.

Is it more water repellant than Scotchgard?

Always looking for something better.
 

post #10 of 17

http://nikwax.com/en-gb/products/productdetail.php?productid=3&activityid=-1&itemid=-1&fabricid=-1

 

It's designed for clothing that was designed to take a DWR (durable water repellent chemical) finish over the waterproof breathable membrane. Some folks like the spray on version better, I prefer the wash in , but follow the directions and pick the product designed for your needs.

 

Also keep in mind that scotchguard is pretty nasty stuff.

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

 

Dirt is natural and organic, it gives your jacket character.

 



My jacket should be quoting Shakespeare.

post #12 of 17

If you think hi fluoro wax is fast then hi fluoro waterproof coatings should be good too.

Scotchgard is 100% fluoro and is toxic as hell.

Never spray it inside and I use a respirator when I spray my stuff after washing.

It is almost as good as the original water repellent finish that you just washed out of the fabric.

Any soap residue left in a washed piece results in very poor water repellency.

post #13 of 17

nikwax (the tx direct people) make a tech wash as well, that is seperate from the tx direct reapplication (wash in and spray on options)

 

it will wash the jacket without stripping the dwr...  typical detergents can strip that dwr and leave a residue that is difficult for the reapplication to adhere to...

 

I like the spray on reapplication because it road trips well, or if I'm spot reapplying for whatever reason (like the suggestion on removing a stain)

 

though in general, washing your jacket on a normal basis and not worrying too much about things like dog blood, will be just fine for the reasonable life of the garment.

post #14 of 17

The problem with the detergents isn't so much stripping the DWR, it's clogging the breathable membrane. As I've mentioned elsewhere, using a pure glycerin soap or soap flakes instead of a synthetic detergent usually causes fewer problems. The nikwax tech wash is ok, but it's expensive as heck considering.

post #15 of 17

I got out 8 year old greasy stains that were on my white ski pants with WD40, I know it sounds weird but I found the answer in a old household helper book.

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the suggestions everyone -- I have used the Nikwax stuff but I doubt a regular washing would get the stains out. And it is expensive as hell!

post #17 of 17

I have had the same issue here in the Midwest when we have wet snow. As soon as I get off the lift I take a handful of snow and rub it on the spot. Surprisingly it takes almost all of it off. It doesn't sound like it should work but it does in my case. I am guessing even though the stains look pretty dark the grease is actually diluted with the moisture on the shiv wheels. Plus my jacket is new and probably does a better job of repelling the grease.

 

I don't know why someone doesn't invent some sort of pan or something under the wheels to catch the drips.

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