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where are my edges gone?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I just received a pair of Fischer RC 4 Worldcup GS Skis in 188cm. I bought them over the internet from a guy racing on fis-level. He said they were his training skis for season 07/08 and since then they have been stored. Got them super cheap for 120$ including a fischer ff17 binding.

However when I first looked at them I was kind of suprised. The edges look super thin compared to my other skis. This is my first true racing ski (not only labeled "worldcup"). Is this standard for racing skis or have the edges just been tuned to death? For comparison: the thinest section of the edges (underfoot) is 0.8-0.6mm thin. On my freeride ski they are 2.2mm.

How many tunes will I get out of these? I use a 400 diamond stone at 87° angle. Should I call the guy, because he didn't say a word about the edges and the skis are fucked because after two tunes the edges will be completely gone? Or shouldn't I worry about that at all?

 

 

 

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fischerrc4worldcupgiant.jpg

post #2 of 24

That is pretty standard for trainers that have been used for a whole season. The edges are thinner than your freeride skis because they have probably been tuned more than 40 times, if he had a full training schedule. If you are just using a diamond stone then there is nothing to worry about. You probably won't be able to reset the edge angle more than a few times, but seeing as you got them for less than the price of new bindings, I wouldn't worry.

post #3 of 24

 

The only thing to worry about is edge blowouts.  

 

Don't take them over any rocks/hard roots that can gouge the plastic near the edge or twist the edge off when under body+turn pressure. 

post #4 of 24

PTex is faster than steel. Welcome to the world of real race skis. You bought a ski an binding for $120... the binding alone cost over $300, what exactly did you think you were buying? New skis?

post #5 of 24

Yup...$120 is a lot for a pair for trainers used a full season...nothing left.  Kinda like buying tires off a race car....You likely got a good set of bindings thou.  Enjoy them while they last...you should get a few good days.

post #6 of 24

This is normal thing. As someone already wrote, ptex is faster then steel, so edges are as thin as possible. Even new, never used skis have edges which are just about milimeter or so thinck, not 2-3mm as it's normal with non racing skis.

post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 

thanks guys.

I got the skis from an auction. I wasn't expecting new skis. I just haven't ever seen such thin edges.

post #8 of 24
Just use a diamond stone on the edges . They will still last longer than you think

BTw, That is also an 04 ski
post #9 of 24

One other thing is that you should see what bevel they used with a bevel guide if possible.  Matching the existing bevel with all future tunes means that less material will have to be taken away to maintain them.  The comments about a diamond stone are very good ones.  Maintaining the existing angle with a diamond stone will make sure they are polished and sharp.  Polishing with the diamond stone in case you already didn't know hardens the edges (making them stay sharp longer - which means that you won't have to tune them as much). 

 

As with the others, I think $120 for those skis regardless of condition is a great deal money wise.  I don't agree as you might have guessed that the edges are fucked.  You'll be fine as long as you don't hit any rocks - in which case you might have been in trouble anyway. 

 

PS - buy K2s or Libertys or Armada next time.  My anecdotal experience is that they use thicker edges and harder steel than other companies.  That might thread jack though. . .

 

post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks. Yes I already checked back with the seller which bevel he used.

kind of OT, but just to make sure: my standard procedure for maintaining edges is

-removing burrs with a coarse whetstone (freehand)

(-setting the edge bevel with a file) -- maybe once per season

-maintaining the bevel with a 400 grit diamond stone

-removing microburrs on the base edge with a gummistone (freehand)

-polishing sideedge with a gummistone (freehand)

 

is this enough/appropriate for a non-comp skier? Or should I extend my tuning gear?

post #11 of 24

Sweet deal for surebeercheer.gif

post #12 of 24

I'd give you $90 for the binding, yes you got a sweat deal so don't complain too much

post #13 of 24

Yes, on the Fischer full GS (FIS) skis (end in either a 3 or an 8 for the ski lengths) they have a thinner piece of metal for the edge- even compared to the Fischer cheater GS skis that look similar. I had a pair of 173 that I picked up in similar condition used off auction, they were fine for the 2 years I skied them. Every pair of full FIS GS skis from Fischer have the thinner (but probably harder) edge material.

post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mondak View Post

 

 

PS - buy K2s or Libertys or Armada next time.  My anecdotal experience is that they use thicker edges and harder steel than other companies.  That might thread jack though. . 

 

Race skis? 

post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by iceage View Post



Race skis? 



Good point.  I am talking about rec skis really (I don't think Liberty or Armada make race skis. . . ). 

 

post #16 of 24

i have the same issue as @cyclerower , i bought a Volkl Racetiger GS fis ski with marker plate and comp 20 bindings, 150 usd, and the edges are thinner than i expected

the skis were used in europacup for one season, probably a junior girl athlete ( 23m radius ) and the base edge has around 1mm thickness and the side edge height is a between 1 and 1,5mm with approximation.

 

the only real danger are rocks in my oppinion.

i have a file and a diamond stone for maintenance

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaprilia View Post
 

the skis were used in europacup for one season, probably a junior girl athlete ( 23m radius ) and the base edge has around 1mm thickness and the side edge height is a between 1 and 1,5mm with approximation.

 

 

Almost new. :) 

post #18 of 24
Look pretty standard for a year as trainers. There is a reason you picked them up at that price.

Provided you don't go crazy wi a file, they should last you a little while.

When buying a used FIS ski, preference typically to the race only ski vs the trainer. Of course those usually fetch a bit more money.

Ski them and have fun on them, you got them at a pretty good price so just enjoy them.
post #19 of 24

Umm... @hbear and @vmaprilia ... if you check the post dates, you'll see these skis were bought and questions asked almost 5 years ago.

post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post
 

Umm... @hbear and @vmaprilia ... if you check the post dates, you'll see these skis were bought and questions asked almost 5 years ago.


Some threads never die.

post #21 of 24
post #22 of 24

i can't see the "ultimate thread killer"

my little experience on other forums in the past taught me that writing in an open thread whose subject interests me is better than opening a new one with the same subject, that's why i wrote here :)

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaprilia View Post
 

i can't see the "ultimate thread killer"

my little experience on other forums in the past taught me that writing in an open thread whose subject interests me is better than opening a new one with the same subject, that's why i wrote here :)


That's it!  Threads don't die.  They show up in search results!  They all continue to live!  :beercheer:

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mondak View Post
 

One other thing is that you should see what bevel they used with a bevel guide if possible.  Matching the existing bevel with all future tunes means that less material will have to be taken away to maintain them. This is not the case with the base edge. In order to retune (NOT MAINTAIN) you must bring the base edge back to -0- before imparting the desired bevel angle, unless you are increasing the base bevel from the current angle.  You cannot reduce base bevel from it's current state unless brought back to zero 1st.   So if you were saying MAINTAIN the edges at their current angle with a diamond...this is fine for the side edge. Don't touch the base edge. NO need , all maintainance should be down on the side.  by the way the side edge angles can be increased or reduced at will without a grind. But 3 degrees would be the place to start on the side for this type of ski. And if you are skiing very hard snow, a 4 degree would not be out of the question.

 

 The comments about a diamond stone are very good ones.  Maintaining the existing angle with a diamond stone will make sure they are polished and sharp.  Polishing with the diamond stone in case you already didn't know hardens the edges (making them stay sharp longer - which means that you won't have to tune them as much). 

 

As with the others, I think $120 for those skis regardless of condition is a great deal money wise.  I don't agree as you might have guessed that the edges are fucked.  You'll be fine as long as you don't hit any rocks - in which case you might have been in trouble anyway. 

 

PS - buy K2s or Libertys or Armada next time.  My anecdotal experience is that they use thicker edges and harder steel than other companies.  That might thread jack though. . .  He bought a FIS RACE SKI?:confused

 


Edited by Atomicman - 12/25/15 at 12:55pm
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