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What do you think is the most dangerous and why?? - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

How bout hosers in yellow jackets?

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yahoo.gifroflmao.gifROTF.gif



Ya looka dat dudes not even whereing a helmut, probalby doesn't use teh safty bar either, if I didnot know better i would think he's from canuckistan.

post #32 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

Its all to do with another thread that got carried away a bit  ( no fault of my own hehe)

 

There seems to be a few different ideas of what would constitute a manageable danger on the ski hills.

So lets ask the Bears at large.

Do you think it is dangerous to have boarders sit on the hill or maybe its dangerous to have folks skinning up hill against the flow of skier traffic?

Or perhaps you have another concern on the hill about safety that can or cant be managed to a minimum.

Lets see your thoughts and how you think they should be handled.

( PS have fun here)


-Boarders sitting mid piste- maybe in an out of sight point - Dangerous
-Skinning/snowshoeing uphill on a groomed track - Here it's expressely forbidden by law
-In fact the latest law project carried the notion of specialized and separated runs (if not whole areas) for each discipline that could be practised at a given resort..the concept resulted impratical and hasn't been implemented/enforced
post #33 of 57

How about cat track run outs with multiple trails merging into it. To top it off the merging trails are a mix of expert and intermediate terrain. Nothing like the skier bombing off his run so he doesn't have to pole only to smack into the dude trying to figure out how to get down who just came around the corner. 

post #34 of 57

 

Quote:
Do you think it is dangerous to have boarders sit on the hill or maybe its dangerous to have folks skinning up hill against the flow of skier traffic?

 

On a semi-serious note (staying out of that other thread): it depends.

 

On an open slope with good conditions and good visibility from above, neither of these are very dangerous IMO.

 

On an icy cat-track or a narrow trail with blind corners or a drop just above?  Asking for trouble.  Yes, skiers/riders should be in control and able to avoid fixed obstacles even if they're in unexpected places.  But it definitely increases the risk of an accident to have people stopped or hiking uphill in situations like that.

 

At our beginner areas, I'll (nicely) ask people hiking uphill (instead of waiting in line) to walk up alongside the carpet, rather than in the middle of the trail.

 

In general, if you're doing something that possibly impacts someone else, you don't get to decide unilaterally what is 'dangerous' and what is 'safe enough'.  In a licensed or privately run ski area, that's usually at the discretion of management/patrol.

post #35 of 57

Most snow-riding deaths (around here, anyway) are single-person accidents in which the victim (usually a male, intermediate to advanced, 20-30 years old, skier) falls on a groomed run and slides into a fixed object.  Which of these would you ban to make things safer?

post #36 of 57
post #37 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdog View Post

How about the inconsiderate chair rider who grabs the safety bar and yanks it down on top of your head with nary a peep of warning ? I appreciate it when someone who is going to use the bar for resting their legs asks politely if everyone is ready before hammering that thing down. Luckily most folks nowadays wear helmets. Still, completely annoying at a minimum.



+1

post #38 of 57

Boarders sitting around and beginners stopped in blind areas in the middle of a trail.   The reason its dangerous is because it is random, whereas say a lift post is where it is always even if it is square in the middle of a trail....and you can see the tower up in the air.   Boarders (which are often early teens) and stopped beginners often don't seem to have any clue as to where to stop.   When I stop to wait for friends I always move off to the side, because I don't want to get hit and because I don't want to ruin someone else's run.   The skinners and snow-shoers I have seen are always off to the side and don't bother me at all.

post #39 of 57

now this is rant on what is dangerous:  people walking in their boots carrying  their poles in one hand gripped in the middle parallel to the ground swinging their arm, poking the space behind them with their pole tips, usually in a tram building or similar walkway. poles vertical, always, pls.

post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

Boarders sitting around and beginners stopped in blind areas in the middle of a trail.  

 

The principal reason I hate cat tracks.  You build up some speed so it doesn't take forever to get to the run you want and come around a corner at a good speed and there are 4-5 boarders spread out across the entire width of the track.  Then they get pissed when you tell them what they're doing is unsafe.
 

post #41 of 57

I've seen some pretty clueless people carry skis and poles in an in-efficient and nearly dangerous manner.  I try to be aware of my surroundings and that usually protects me from them.  Occasionally I will try to politely point it out to them.  I used to cover things like this in my lessons along with safety code, but don't as much any more now that I teach upper level lessons 98% of the time.  I still try to make it a point to talk about defensive skiing and situational awareness in every lesson.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

now this is rant on what is dangerous:  people walking in their boots carrying  their poles in one hand gripped in the middle parallel to the ground swinging their arm, poking the space behind them with their pole tips, usually in a tram building or similar walkway. poles vertical, always, pls.

post #42 of 57

Flat light.

 

Bad light affects everyone to some extent. An advanced skier may be more able to feel and deal with what they encounter than an intermediate or novice, but i think bad light is more dangerous than skiing without a helmut.

post #43 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

I've seen some pretty clueless people carry skis and poles in an in-efficient and nearly dangerous manner.  I try to be aware of my surroundings and that usually protects me from them.  Occasionally I will try to politely point it out to them.  I used to cover things like this in my lessons along with safety code, but don't as much any more now that I teach upper level lessons 98% of the time.  I still try to make it a point to talk about defensive skiing and situational awareness in every lesson.
 


 

 

How many victims of errant pole carrying have ended up in the patrol room/ambulance/ER? 

 

It's not that you can't ski without poles, you can't ski and skiing without poles proves it. If skiers with poles weren't allowed on lifts our sport would be much safer. 

post #44 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy View Post

Flat light.

 

Bad light affects everyone to some extent. An advanced skier may be more able to feel and deal with what they encounter than an intermediate or novice, but i think bad light is more dangerous than skiing without a helmut.

+1
 

 

post #45 of 57

I don't know how much of this thread is a joke, but here are my thoughts on what is most dangerous:

 

-Wreckless, manic (or stimmed-out) teenagers that ski into you at the bottom and don't apologize (I was pummeled while standing in a liftline by a couple people like this... that could be seriously dangerous in some cases).

 

-Oblivious NASTAR volunteers standing in the finish area (almost bulldozed an older gentleman last week like this)... this extends to anybody standing in middle of trail or at bottom where people are going to be going fast

 

-Out-of-control people (literally)... at Tremblant some kid literally went flying by me on one of the South-side groomers... prolly would have broken back or something if he hit me.

 

-I don't care what ability you are, but honestly people of less ability who ski trails of a certain pitch make HUGE sweeping s-turns basically traversing the whole hill back and forth.  What's actually worse is this often takes place with kids on nearly-FLAT beginner/intermediate trails where you'd expect the kids would be within their comfort zone and able to move forward.

 

 

 

In general, if slopes get crowded like they do on weekends at big resorts, really fun/unrestricted charging on the groomers may not be an option.

post #46 of 57

Being trapped on a chairlift when you decide to make one last run.

You might try to jump down, but you'd break your legs and be eaten by wolves.

You could traverse the cable, but you'd cut your hands.

And be eaten by wolves.

They should make a movie about that.

Oh wait they did.

 

post #47 of 57
I completely agree with the errant poles comments. Many errant swinging poles from careless people in the lodge have come close to hitting me in the face. It's only a matter of time before such a thing causes a serious eye injury in someone (as if it has not already).
post #48 of 57

running laterally (even at very low speed) into someone's tails at the top or bottom of the lift; twin tips or turned up tails can be spun out and pull the skiers legs out and around in a slow twisting fall.

post #49 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdog View Post

How about the inconsiderate chair rider who grabs the safety bar and yanks it down on top of your head with nary a peep of warning ? I appreciate it when someone who is going to use the bar for resting their legs asks politely if everyone is ready before hammering that thing down. Luckily most folks nowadays wear helmets. Still, completely annoying at a minimum.



I agree, but sometimes the inconsiderate still happens. I often speak up and introduce a thought for the day before the bar comes down, and say something like "when we lower the safety bar carefully and gently, I call it ‘bar-tender'." This ensures some communication about lowering the bar before someone jumps the gun, and also solicits a little laughter -- especially from about 2pm onwards.

post #50 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoredAtBMBW View Post

I completely agree with the errant poles comments. Many errant swinging poles from careless people in the lodge have come close to hitting me in the face. It's only a matter of time before such a thing causes a serious eye injury in someone (as if it has not already).


I am always frightened by the people that carry their poles tips up.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

running laterally (even at very low speed) into someone's tails at the top or bottom of the lift; twin tips or turned up tails can be spun out and pull the skiers legs out and around in a slow twisting fall.


Yup. Saw a girl do that to an instructor today. Fortunately the instructor was fine, and she politley educated the girl.
 

 

post #51 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by iKabrex View Post

Being trapped on a chairlift when you decide to make one last run.

You might try to jump down, but you'd break your legs and be eaten by wolves.

You could traverse the cable, but you'd cut your hands.

And be eaten by wolves.

They should make a movie about that.

Oh wait they did.

 

Hilarious.  I watched it, it was pretty bad.

post #52 of 57

Quote:

Originally Posted by ohio blows View Post

Snowboarders huddled in their make shift parking lots is fine with me as long as they aren't under a roller

This x1000. 

 

Fact:  30% of the boarders and skiers at the east coast resort you're at have a prescient ability to stop (to chat about the next 50 yards of groomer they might totally rip in the next 15-20 minutes i guess) in the only place on the run where you can't see them.   

post #53 of 57

Neither is dangerous, just annoying. Boarders more so since they do it in the middle side by side, whereas people going up tend to stick to the side single file.

post #54 of 57

Seriously speaking, the most dangerous is usually high speed horizontal traverses (i.e a green run running horizontal across the mountain) that cross with high traffic cruisers (the ones all the yetis bomb down). This isn't the most common kind of intersection but I've seen some serious accidents that way.

post #55 of 57

this:

 

http://www.skihood.com/Community-and-News/Meadows-Blog

 

puts things in perspective. will try to see it tomorrow. 

post #56 of 57

On merging trails at any big resort I've been to, there always seems to be "Trails Merging" signs posted in conspicuous fashion, and/or clear "caution" or "slow skiing zone" signs.  I'd imagine some people might be oblivious to this or just not care, but it's not like people can't see it coming.  I think the uphill skiers--in this situation--have the duty to be in control enough to stop or move to avoid collisions.

 

 

Furthermore, I believe full-body protection should be commonplace.  I don't know why more companies don't make comfy pads with visco-elastic dough (even pretty thin), with plastic shelling in key areas.  These might prevent blunt-force trauma (especially chest) that is I believe the second most common cause of injury/death from skiing after head (I think it is even above neck injuries).  Shoulder protection would mitigate clavicle fractures (one of the most common fractures, and even more so in skiing collisions and--perhaps--extreme solo falls into trees or ice).

 

I know there are plenty of options out there (few alpine varieties, BMX and motorcycle pads, etc), but I've tried some on and they were EXTREMELY uncomfortable, to the point I will not wear my Demon Venom vest anymore... and I feel bad because I know it is almost as important as a helmet.

post #57 of 57

Last month I saw some kids bombing a trail (A) that ran down the valley in to a gully with a trail (B) running perpendicular along that gully and another trail (C) coming down from the other side of the valley to that gully.  The kids were bombing down trail A cutting across B then skiing uphill on C to hit a jump skiing UPHILL about 300 feet on C.  They were probably going 45-50 mph as they crossed B, and people coming down B were blind to folks cutting across and uphill from A.

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