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Waxing relatively new skis

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

So, I have new skis that I've only skied a few times. They are now in need of waxing, as there appears to be a small patch of base burn on one of them.

Anyway, I've read many of the waxing threads and it seems like waxing is more of an art than a science, as everyone has their own opinions/methods. However, does the following approach sound reasonable (I don't want to do anything that will screw things up):

Brush with bronze brush or scotchbrite pad (especially in little area with base burn)

Iron on base prep wax and do a hot scrape

Apply a layer of colder temp wax (like a swix CH6), allow to cool and do a normal scrape

Then wax for the days conditions/temps as normal

 

Thx

post #2 of 14

 

FWIW, the bronze brush and the scotchbrite pad are not equivalent tools.

 

A bronze brush:

- clears old hard wax from the surface

- clears out hard wax from inside existing structure

- opens structure (if the bristles are still sharp)

- tends to raise hairs from the base

 

A scotchbrite -type pad:

- clears old wax from the surface

- tends to snap off ptex hairs from the base

 

For your app, since the skis are essentially new, the pad seems indicated.

 

Otherwise sounds reasonable.

post #3 of 14

FTR its a brass brush not bronze. Bronze is a much harder metal and would probably alter the base structure of your skis similar to what steel brushes do

 

IMO I would forgo the pad and just use the brush.  The pad will tend to flatten your structure...it is an abrasive media after-all.

 

If you want to restore the speed your skis had when you bought them you will need to brush out the excess wax and polish with a nylon brush.  This is not necessary since the wax will eventually wear out, but if you want like new performance then this is what it will take.

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

FTR its a brass brush not bronze. Bronze is a much harder metal and would probably alter the base structure of your skis similar to what steel brushes do

 

:)  Until the OP tells us different I will assume that a bronze brush is what he has:

 

http://www.swixsport.com/eway/default.aspx?pid=278&trg=MainPage_6117&MainContent_6179=6117:0:24,2742&MainPage_6117=6138:39868::0:6144:12:::0:0

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post



 

:)  Until the OP tells us different I will assume that a bronze brush is what he has:

 

http://www.swixsport.com/eway/default.aspx?pid=278&trg=MainPage_6117&MainContent_6179=6117:0:24,2742&MainPage_6117=6138:39868::0:6144:12:::0:0


Never even realized that they also made ski brushes in bronze.....go figure....learn something new every day.

post #6 of 14

Does anybody use base cleaner any more?

post #7 of 14

Yesss.... but we whisper about it.

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Great, thanks

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Does anybody use base cleaner any more?


Yes. Those if use who value our time more than old wives tales. Proper use is a benefit.

 

You can also remove base burn/freshen base structure with a SkiVisions structuring tool.

 

Edit: Old wives tales with tails. redface.gif


Edited by Alpinord - 9/22/11 at 5:17pm
post #10 of 14


Glad I live on the east coast where old wives have no tails.  That would freak me out! eek.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


Yes. Those if use who value our time more than old wives tails. Proper use is a benefit.

 

You can also remove base burn/freshen base structure with a SkiVisions structuring tool.

 

post #11 of 14

Hey, hey

(oops). It must be a Rocky Mountain Darwinian thing. wink.gif

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doctor D View Post

Glad I live on the east coast where old wives have no tails.  That would freak me out! eek.gif

post #12 of 14

I value my time and my skis.  You can disagree but don't call the basis for hot-wax scraping an old wive's tale - there is fact behind it.

post #13 of 14

It's no different than using a hot iron on your bases. If you let it camp out or is too harsh it's a problem. If you use it properly, it is a useful option and tool.

post #14 of 14

Base cleaner is great for tools and repair jobs but is quite harsh on bases.  Flouro clean media is much better for bases and won't affect all that hard work you put into your bases.  It's a mix of base cleaner and conditioning agents, works great and most wax companies offer it now.

 

 

 

 

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