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Is the lift ticket pricing model killing the sport? - Page 11

post #301 of 310

I've been twice to restaurants where they were locally "famous" for some reason and waited endlessly between each course, to the point that I fell asleep.  Once was in Indiana, once in the Caribbean.  It happens.  And once in New Jersey where the waitress mysteriously had most of her customers in the other room and kept forgetting us.  We finally got a free dinner out of that one because we got up and went looking and complained to management and NOTHING improved.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Uh, where do you eat?  Waiting a couple of hours for your food?  I've been in popular restaurants all over the country, hell, the world, and never waited that long.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellside View Post

Your analogy don't quite work if I read it correctly because the food is cold which translate to bad skiing. It is not uncommon for people to wait for a couple of hours in a popular restaurent for good food.
 


 


 



 

post #302 of 310

Boiling Crab in San Jose during weekend is pretty busy, waiting is common. I went to a Japanese BBQ place in Cupertino in December, they don't take reservation at that time. I went there to put my name down at 5:30PM and they call me at 10PM at home to inform me they are sorry that they can't fit me in that night.  Or you can try Orenchi Ramen in South Bay. The wait is also long,maybe not two hours because sometimes by 7:30 they will have sold out their soup base and have to turn people away.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Uh, where do you eat?  Waiting a couple of hours for your food?  I've been in popular restaurants all over the country, hell, the world, and never waited that long.
 



 



 

post #303 of 310

I'm not even talking about waiting to get in, that's different.  There are places where your order is taken and you are still starving after 2 hours.  

post #304 of 310

Yeah, there's definitely a difference between waiting to get in - something you should expect if you go to a popular restaurant, especially if it's 6 - 7 p.m. on a Saturday night - and waiting ridiculous amounts of time while staring at your water cup. Or waiting for your check and the waitress disappears, leaving you sitting around like a fool when all you want to do is leave.

 

But even the wait to get in can be enough to turn a customer away temporarily/permanently, if the restaurant doesn't know how to estimate properly and leaves you sitting around starving. Did that Japanese BBQ tell you it would be so long, or did they just leave you hanging for five hours? Because the idea of leaving  people sitting for five hours only to tell them you can't fit them in is awful, awful customer service. I would never go back, unless maybe it was opening weekend and it was clear they were just totally overwhelmed and inexperienced.

post #305 of 310

As long as people want to pay for the image and excess that hovers around the the sport of skiing, they will get to pay an increasing amount, and the places of greatest image and excess will be glad to collect. The bigger the image, the bigger the price.

 

 

 

 

post #306 of 310

That was my second visit. They had told me I won't get seated until after 8 pm the earliest. I think I should have left that part out in my post and just say

 

"Your analogy don't quite work if I read it correctly because the food is cold which translate to bad skiing."
 

I think there is a wide spectrum of skiers, some don't care about amaennities at all while some do to various degrees.

 

Since both Squaw and Kirkwood are mentioned here, I will add that Kirkwood is good at something that Squaw is very bad at. 2 or 3 years ago, when Squaw moved the season ticket office to a small upstair office during remodeling, I accompanied my friend to get his season pass. There was a line, not really that long but long enough that we waited about 1 1/2 hour and at least half of people waited outside the building in pretty cold temperature. The lines were also long the next week of that year when I went to Kirkwood to get my season pass. Kirkwood just gave everybody waiting in line a free ticket to go skiing right away.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

Yeah, there's definitely a difference between waiting to get in - something you should expect if you go to a popular restaurant, especially if it's 6 - 7 p.m. on a Saturday night - and waiting ridiculous amounts of time while staring at your water cup. Or waiting for your check and the waitress disappears, leaving you sitting around like a fool when all you want to do is leave.

 

But even the wait to get in can be enough to turn a customer away temporarily/permanently, if the restaurant doesn't know how to estimate properly and leaves you sitting around starving. Did that Japanese BBQ tell you it would be so long, or did they just leave you hanging for five hours? Because the idea of leaving  people sitting for five hours only to tell them you can't fit them in is awful, awful customer service. I would never go back, unless maybe it was opening weekend and it was clear they were just totally overwhelmed and inexperienced.


 

 

post #307 of 310

I totally agree with you...that is why me and the soon to be wife are planning on relocating from Atlanta to the Denver area to be closer to all things hi-country.  Summer in Colorado is just as funa as the winter....and you don't need to pay $100 to get on a mountain to hike or mtn bike.

 

I plan on buying a pass for next year.

 

On another note...anyone hiring software sales reps in the Denver area?

post #308 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmund Rudell View Post

I totally agree with you...that is why me and the soon to be wife are planning on relocating from Atlanta to the Denver area to be closer to all things hi-country.  Summer in Colorado is just as funa as the winter....and you don't need to pay $100 to get on a mountain to hike or mtn bike.

 

I plan on buying a pass for next year.

 

On another note...anyone hiring software sales reps in the Denver area?


To be fair, you don't have to pay $100 to ski the mountain either. Or much of anything. Something else to look forward to about moving to Denver wink.gif

 

post #309 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

Sounds like you're mad, bro.

 

I'm not sure what you're really mad about, but choosing a business based on the best customer experience is kind of the foundation of consumerism. If you eat at a restaurant where it takes an hour to get a plate of cold food and another hour to get the check when you're done, do you "stop trying to convert the world," or do you go to a different restaurant?


Looks like you're projecting, bro! I'm not mad, bro! You look "mad" though! Like you can't tolerate a difference of opinion and assume the difference must be rooted in anger! Everyone must agree with me -- else they're mad, bro!

Interesting perspective.

Here's a thought for you: you assume "consumerism" is the only way things ever have been, the way things always are, and the way things always will be. You also assume everyone loves consumerism. And most relevant to this thread, you think the sport of skiing wouldn't exist without consumerism.

I think you're wrong on all those assumptions -- and not because I'm "mad, bro." No, it's because you're wrong, and you refuse to consider other views!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

When I pumped septic tanks for a living, I tried to convince everyone to pump their tanks at least every two years. 

Now I'm in the ski business, so naturally, I'd like everyone to invest in their ski experience.........

No Sh!t! 

 

 

Just sayingbiggrin.gif


I hear you. But not everyone thinks the Entrepreneurial Model is the essence of reality. I've been successful in several fields of work and not once did I ever have to engage in hucksterism, entrepreneurial boosterism, or any kind of sales -- hard-sell or soft-sell. I think good work or good services sell themselves and don't need marketing or consumerist attitudes to make them work. But that's my experience talking, not me regurgitating what I assume to be a Cultural Truth about America.
post #310 of 310

NSAA announces winners of their conversion cup

 

 

(LAKEWOOD, Colo. May 1, 2013) – Today the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA) named New Jersey’s Mountain Creek Resort as the winner of its third annual Conversion Cup Challenge, sponsored by Head Wintersports. The announcement was made during NSAA’s National Convention and Tradeshow in Palm Springs, California. Other finalists for the Cup included Oregon’s Mt. Bachelor (winner of the 2012 Cup) and Pennsylvania’s Camelback Mountain Resort. Conversion Cup applications are judged on a number of key skier and snowboarder conversion indicators including:

- Increases in Level 1 lesson volumes;

- Level 1 lesson volumes in relation to total skier and snowboarder visits;

- Quantifiable success of multi-lesson packages;

- Season-to-date sales and repeat sales data on specific “learn-to” packages;

- Overall data collection and tracking capabilities and sophistication;

- Marketing ingenuity, creativity, use of new media, etc.

As part of its effort, Mountain Creek presented its three-time terrain-based learning package that offers beginner skiers and snowboarders discounted lessons including lift tickets and rental gear. The resort’s terrain-based learning system is designed to remove the fear and confusion often associated with first-time ski and snowboard lessons. Mountain Creek realized a 5 percent increase in beginner lessons during the 2012/13 season. Of those that took lessons, 33 percent returned for a second lesson, and 28 percent took a third lesson. Each of the lesson takers received a follow-up email offering additional discounts and promotions and encouraging continued engagement in the sport. The Conversion Cup is a traveling award. Last year’s winner, Mt. Bachelor, claimed the Cup for the 2012/13 season. An in-depth review of this year’s Conversion Cup winner will be highlighted in the Summer issue of the NSAA Journal.

http://www.nsaa.org/media/143941/NSAA_Conversion_Cup_Finalist_release_12.13.pdf

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