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Is the lift ticket pricing model killing the sport?

post #1 of 310
Thread Starter 

I've thought about this for years.

 

I've been skiing since I was three years old- I'm, now in my 30's. I grew up in a solidly middle class family with 4 kids.

 

My family though skiing was terribly expensive in the early 1980's and 1990s. After all, a single day ticket window price for Aspen was $30!  We scraped, and managed to go skiing between 10 and 15 times a year, and had a ball.

 

I remember in the early 1990's, Monarch, a Southern Colorado local mountain (with awesome snow) aggressively advertised their local lift ticket at $18 a day, every day.  There were always plenty of coupons and other discounts.

 

Really, up until the mid 1990's, you could almost always get relatively cheap day lift tickets, through grocery stores, coupon books, and many other promotions. Supermarket discount tickets were typically 1/3 or so off ticket window prices.

 

I knew nobody growing up with a season pass. The very concept to me seemed amazing, and they were quite pricey.

 

Then, for some reason that I still can't fathom, despite the glaring anti-competition and anti-trust issues, in the mid 1990's, Vail was allowed to buy Keystone and Breck, with the only limitation being that they had to split off Arapahoe Basin (which was also owned by the same company that owned Key and Breck).

 

The first season after this, the coupons were gone, the discount supermarket tickets were gone, and the window prices were up.  And they go up every year, far faster than inflation. For the "I ski 3 times a year" skier, it is by far more expensive to ski than it has been at any other point in my life and it marches on, every year.

 

A few years afte rthe Vail buyout, to combat Vail owning 65% of Denver skier visits, other resorts start offering very, very cheap season passes, and the season pass war was on.

 

Now, every year, season passes fight it out at very competitive rates to score the Denver traffic, while the profit is made on the backs of the destination skier.

 

if you own a pass and ski 50 days a year (and lets face it, the way the pricing model works, if you ski 50 days a year, you almost certainly have a pass, and thus ski the lions share of those days at the place you bought the pass), it is cheaper than it has ever been to ski. I'm already at an effective $10 daily lift ticket, with 2 1/2 months left in the season.

 

So, season passes are great for us, the established skier. We can thank the gods that we don't have to get gouged at the ticket window.

 

BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO NEW PEOPLE LEARNING THE SPORT?

 

In Colorado, the cheapest ticket window lift tickets runs right about $55. Add in the ski rental for another $20. Add in gas, lunch, and the bits and pieces of clothing one needs to round out their ski ensemble, and even going budget, you are easily looking at $150 per person for that first day.

 

For a family of 4, $500 ish for one day.

 

And remember, many/most people don't really have fun their first day of skiing. You may have moments of fun, but most of that first day is spent awkwardly fumbling with long things on your feet that don't really do what you want them to do. For most people, even those that turn into addicts, it normally takes several visits to get to the point where it is unmitigated fun.

 

Who can afford to invest that kind of money?

 

I don't think enough people can afford it, and I think demographics back me up. As far as I know, since the mid 1990's, the average age of a skier has been steadily increasing, and the number of new people joining the sport are decreasing. Skier visits are increasing, but that is likely the effect of cheap season passes.

 

I am in my early 30's, and already have a blown up knee (not from skiing). I probably have ten years left (I hope) before the knee becomes too bad to ski. Much as we would like to, we can't do this forever.

 

The current ticket pricing is a huge barrier to entry. is their a ski "bubble" on the horizon when there simply aren't enough skiers left to support the industry?

post #2 of 310

Many of my friends who used to be avid skiers when mom and dad used to pay for it no longer ski for two reasons.  Fear of injury with the responsibilities of an adult, and the cost.   I don't ski nearly as much as I would like to in part because I don't like to ski at the same place all the time so a dollar wise season pass does not suit me, as such to ski in various locations costs hundreds to thousands of dollars every season.   If I were to go out west and such I would easily need $10k+ a year for skiing expenses...and that would be taking it easy; not splurging.   I think the lift tickets in Vt have gotten out of hand. personally.

post #3 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

I


 

In Colorado, the cheapest ticket window lift tickets runs right about $55. Add in the ski rental for another $20. Add in gas, lunch, and the bits and pieces of clothing one needs to round out their ski ensemble, and even going budget, you are easily looking at $150 per person for that first day.

 


Baker offers lifts, lessons and rentals for $48.

 

Skiing is alive and well, thank you.

post #4 of 310
Thread Starter 

I was wondering whether the dynamics were different in other states.  In Colorado, season pass prices increase steeply for areas that do not get front range day skiers, and thus, aren't involved in the season pass war. However, that doesn't help what they charge at the window.

 

Still, skiers are getting older, less people are getting into the sport, and those of us that live and breath powder can't ski it forever...

post #5 of 310

I hear what you are saying. I live in a low snow area (Carolinas). Even for me to get to the local hill I'm 2 1/2 hrs away and wouldnt want to limit my sking to here as lets face it the pitch and vert are limited.( I do really enjoy it)

It seems to me that to go to a major resort by the time I purchase plane fare or drive, then a weeks ticket is usually as much as a seasons pass or close to it.

It would be nice to get a bit of a cut when showing up for a week , maybe I would have 3 or 4 weeks then, I cant always plan on going that often but after my second trip of the year away i always think about the pass costs.

Mind you I don't see the lodging cutting the stay cost for us either, I guess the demand is still such that they can charge the price.

Now you have me thinking LOL

Flights are 300-700$ depending on when you book and were you go ( Canada can be 1200 from here),450-500 for a weeks pass,700-2000 for a room,200-300 for a rental car,400-800 easy for meals. ( thiss is only one person and the wife and I go together so double the air ,lift tickets and meals.so pretty easy for the two of us to spend 4,000 a week plus what ever on pickup items new skis clothes and such.

We do this 2 times a year usually plus lots of little side trips, yup 8,000-10,000 a year on average for the two of us to ski.

Im starting to think some of us here spend 10,000 wiser. Like take a winter off and rent a place seasons passes and drive up because you have more then a week to ski, cook your food and relax a bit more.

 

I really need a transfer to the denver area I think

post #6 of 310

A ski lift ticket at Mont-Tremblant, QC, comes to about $90 with taxes. 

post #7 of 310

Not that family skiing is inexpensive anywhere, but the dynamics are different in most other locations than high daily ticket/low season pass pricing anomaly at the big resorts in Colorado. Where there's a will, there's still a way.  I don't subscribe to the idea that current costs have eliminated middle class access to the sport of snowriding.

There are ways for casual skiers to visit non-destination resorts in an affordable way.  The aforementioned beginners lift/lesson/rentals packages are usually in the $60-75 range.  For those beyond the first timer stage there are a number of surefire ways to cut costs:  use those occasional "teacher's work days" to take your kids for inexpensive, crowd-free skiing/riding on non-holiday weekdays.  If you combine that approach with miscellaneous other discounts such as military, ladies day, two-fers, ski shop discounts, customer appreciation days, Liftopia, and scouring the web for places like Epicski to find out about bargains, etc, etc, you may find a good smaller hill with lift prices close to those 1980's figures you mentioned for Monarch.  Get to preseason ski-swaps and buy your kids decent used clothing/gear.  Skis, boots, and poles can be had for the price of two or three days of rentals, then hand this gear down to younger children when the older kids grow out of it. Lots of resorts have deep recurring discounts on weekdays.  Exploit those whenever possible.  Go skiing in late season when many resorts drop even their weekend prices for everything including lodging.  The warmer weather is kid friendly.  Band together with like-minded families and stay for less in condos or ski houses.  Join ski clubs.  Carpool to save gas money.  Brown bag your meals.  If you get really organized and get to ski frequently, then a season pass, even a pricey one, makes sense for the entire family.

 

Avoid the trap of thinking that the family will only enjoy skiing if they have state of the art gear, slopeside lodging and fancy meals.  The real pleasure comes in just being together, preferably at a smaller place with low crowds and prices and beautiful spring weather.

 

Wife and I have raised four skiers.  More ideas here:  http://www.epicski.com/wiki/how-to-plan-a-family-ski-vacation

post #8 of 310

What's the worst price ski ticket - $100? And that's for 8 hours to flail around the hill on expensive uphill hardware that only gets (for the most part) 4-6 months to be amortized by the ski area owner. When my kids were young, we did day trips, made our own sandwiches, brought drinks, found lift ticket discounts, etc., etc.

 

What's a round of golf cost? Around here $150 isn't hard to find, and that's for about half the time (4 hours for 18 holes), with far less infrastructure that can get revenue throughout the year. Any number of other sports make skiing pale in comparison cost-wise (try diving or karting with the family), so, in my opinion, if you want to play, you're going to pay, and considering what you get when skiing, the price isn't so bad, and can be easily minimized.

 

I'm taking son #2 to Whistler for a week next week, and have found ways to ensure I can take 6-8 trips per year and not break the bank. No, it's not cheap, but neither are many of my other hobbies or activities.

 

Oh yeah, let's "thank" the legal community to their contribution to the cost of a lift ticket for all the ambulance chasers taking care of the Darwin candidates that drive up the cost of a daily lift ticket.

post #9 of 310

Well put, James. I believe you hit the nail on the head. Many people think of ski trips as "slopeside at Vail," which would be super expensive. However, most forget many of the key things you pointed out, such as renting houses, going to the local grocery store so you can cook breakfast/dinner and pack your lunches, going late-season, etc.

 

I've made some trips that have been ridiculously cheap when properly planned! One of my most epic and cheap trips (we're talking poor college student cheap) was at a B&B by Taos, NM a few years back.

 

There are still great deals to be had, and affordable ways to take your family skiing, IF you're willing to do the planning and legwork of finding the deals.

post #10 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

I was wondering whether the dynamics were different in other states.  In Colorado, season pass prices increase steeply for areas that do not get front range day skiers, and thus, aren't involved in the season pass war. However, that doesn't help what they charge at the window.

 

Still, skiers are getting older, less people are getting into the sport, and those of us that live and breath powder can't ski it forever...


Sunday we sold out. The parking lots were full by noon. The "older crowd" was a small fraction of the people there. 2009-2010 was the second busiest season ever for the US, after the 2007-2008 season. Every weekend, we have hundreds of kids in lessons.

 

 

 

 

post #11 of 310

Vail next week walk-up single day ticket.  $108.

post #12 of 310

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

I don't think enough people can afford it, and I think demographics back me up. As far as I know, since the mid 1990's, the average age of a skier has been steadily increasing, and the number of new people joining the sport are decreasing. Skier visits are increasing, but that is likely the effect of cheap season passes.


Do you have data to back any of those statements up?  I can easily counter by saying that the advent of terrain parks and snowboarding in the past 20 years has lowered the average age of skiers, and brought many new people into the sport.  The future of skiing has never looked brighter.  Am I right?  I don't have a clue, I haven't seen any data.

 

Skiing is expensive, yes, and some people do get priced out of the sport.  But what would you like to see happening instead?  Maybe you do have a better business plan for the ski areas, but all I read up above is "skiing's too expensive, they should make it cheaper!"  Really?  Is that going to improve the situation?  At the ski areas around Seattle, the limiting factor is generally parking.  A couple weeks ago Crystal had to turn away anyone who showed up after 11am because there was nowhere to park.  At Stevens on many Saturdays so far this year, people have been parking in an overflow lot 10 minutes down the road and getting shuttled up, and that's even for people showing up at 9:45am.  The ski areas are already pretty much full on weekends.  So they should charge less money?  And not get any more people because they're already at capacity?  That seems like a fantastic plan for them.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

If I were to go out west and such I would easily need $10k+ a year for skiing expenses...and that would be taking it easy; not splurging.

 

No, you wouldn't.  You may *choose* to spend that much (on what I don't have a clue), but you absolutely, 100% do not *need* to.

post #13 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Vail next week walk-up single day ticket.  $108.



Ture enough, but the Epic Pass I got in the fall was just north of $600 - with unlimited skiing at Vail, A Basin and a couple others. Not sure why anyone who lives in CO would not do this - or get the other pass you have to buy in CO for less.

 

On Saturday I leave for Vail and will be there for 14 days. With the Gathering in March/April, that adds like six or seven more. So for about $600 I am skiing at about $30 per day. I can also buy "cheaper" buddy tix for my wife. That does not include travel and lodging costs, of course, but that was not part of the OP's point. I assume that the areas that support the Epic Pass must regard it and other similar products as loss leaders. You spent your $ on the ticket months ago and will now shell out comparatively more $ on food and drink. It would be interesting to know what percentage of people actually pay the window price.

 

No such luck here in Maine. We have passes to Sugarloaf. If you buy in April, the cheapest is about $1000 per for the pass with no blackout days. I have 14 days in so it (at like $77 per) is "paid for." With March and April wide open, except for the Gathering, I should get in about 25-30 days at home, which brings the per outing cost to about $30. Same as Vail. Frankly, there is also less pressure I find with a pass. If you spend $108 at Vail or $77 at the Loaf, you want a "dawn to dusk" ski day, and you want each day to be the best of your life. With a pass, I find I am more casual about it. I may ski only four hours and call it a day without fretting.

 

Moral of the story - ski tix are a commodity. If you can set up your season right, buy a pass (or two) and ski your ass off. Most fun you can have for $30 with your clothes on.

David

post #14 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

What's the worst price ski ticket - $100? And that's for 8 hours to flail around the hill on expensive uphill hardware that only gets (for the most part) 4-6 months to be amortized by the ski area owner.

 

Breckenridge $102

Vail $105 now

 

My cost < $30  (W/Colorado Pass -  Vail/BC unlimited in April)
 

post #15 of 310

The big corporate ski areas no longer directly charge related to what it costs to operate a mountain. They charge what the market is prepared to pay with an eye on hitting their target skier numbers. If they hit that target they then price their food at what the market is prepared to pay to hit their target sales volume.

 

Then they run the books at the end of the year and see if they have won.

 

If the market didn't want to pay or the hill wasn't hitting it's target numbers they would lower prices.  Sounds like the market as a whole likes the price.

 

If they raise ticket prices and lower skier numbers, they will also have to factor in loss of food, etc revenue. If you lower ticket prices, then you end up with too many on the hill and excessive lift lines and a poor customer satisfaction record.

 

 

I have always had the feeling there is a better way, and the resort that finds it will be laughing all the way to the bank.

 

Lots of independent hills out there that do just fine doing what they do without trying to max out the profit.... they have never expanded, built a real-estate business or hotels, etc.... But people love then because they feel they get value, service, friendliness, etc, etc....

post #16 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post

 


Do you have data to back any of those statements up?  I can easily counter by saying that the advent of terrain parks and snowboarding in the past 20 years has lowered the average age of skiers, and brought many new people into the sport.  The future of skiing has never looked brighter.  Am I right?  I don't have a clue, I haven't seen any data.

 

Skiing is expensive, yes, and some people do get priced out of the sport.  But what would you like to see happening instead?  Maybe you do have a better business plan for the ski areas, but all I read up above is "skiing's too expensive, they should make it cheaper!"  Really?  Is that going to improve the situation?  At the ski areas around Seattle, the limiting factor is generally parking.  A couple weeks ago Crystal had to turn away anyone who showed up after 11am because there was nowhere to park.  At Stevens on many Saturdays so far this year, people have been parking in an overflow lot 10 minutes down the road and getting shuttled up, and that's even for people showing up at 9:45am.  The ski areas are already pretty much full on weekends.  So they should charge less money?  And not get any more people because they're already at capacity?  That seems like a fantastic plan for them.

 

 

No, you wouldn't.  You may *choose* to spend that much (on what I don't have a clue), but you absolutely, 100% do not *need* to.

I yeah I would need to spend that much.  As it is often cited the skiing experience is best shared with good friends and or family, and while I have no problems staying in a bare bones shack, the company I keep does.   As such we regularly approach $10k a year to ski just here on the East coast, no planes.  This is the first season in 10 years that I have not done the usual.
 

post #17 of 310

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

I yeah I would need to spend that much.  As it is often cited the skiing experience is best shared with good friends and or family, and while I have no problems staying in a bare bones shack, the company I keep does.   As such we regularly approach $10k a year to ski just here on the East coast, no planes.  This is the first season in 10 years that I have not done the usual.
 


Like I said, you choose to spend that much.  I'm not criticizing how you choose to spend your money, but simply pointing out that someone can do an awful lot of skiing for an awful lot less $ than that, if they want to.  You said you have friends that were avid skiers that stopped skiing because of the cost.  Well, skiing can be done a *whole* lot cheaper than 10k a year (unless there's a helicopter involved).  If someone really wants to ski, they can do it far cheaper than you choose to.

post #18 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post

 


Like I said, you choose to spend that much.  I'm not criticizing how you choose to spend your money, but simply pointing out that someone can do an awful lot of skiing for an awful lot less $ than that, if they want to.  You said you have friends that were avid skiers that stopped skiing because of the cost.  Well, skiing can be done a *whole* lot cheaper than 10k a year (unless there's a helicopter involved).  If someone really wants to ski, they can do it far cheaper than you choose to.

Oh I know that, and wish I could benefit from that more often, but unfortunately or fortunately depending on how you look at it, that is not my case.  If I can trade in my friends and family for new ones then it would be much easier but then that would defeat the whole point.
 

post #19 of 310

I was wondering about this the other day. Of course, I had just skied Belleayre for a $20 Wednesday! biggrin.gif

 

Back when an ex of mine was in grad school, we took a trip out to Utah. We decided to stick to AltaBird & SolBright.

we stayed at a Comfort Inn at Sandy. I think we were there for 5 days of skiing. We rented a car for the first day (to hit the slopes and drop our stuff off at the hotel) and the other days we took the local bus that ran to the Mountains. VERY CHEAP. It can be done, it just depends upon what you want to put up with. That can be a lot of schlepping with kids. The ride to/from was only about 30 min each way. The weird thing is, the hotel rates are basically the same as 1997( i just checked)! The lift tickets are about double their old costs. Of course, any entertainment now costs you about double what you paid in 1997, so I think that's a wash.

Ask someone what its like to go to a football or baseball game these days with a 4 person family. Everything is pricey. It's all relative. It's also what the market will bear. The big hills will almost always charge a crapload, that's why I rarely frequent them! Almost any hill has discounts in some way, you just have to find them.

post #20 of 310

You can ski Mt.Norquay in Banff for 85c on the first Thursday of each month......

post #21 of 310
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post


Do you have data to back any of those statements up?  I can easily counter by saying that the advent of terrain parks and snowboarding in the past 20 years has lowered the average age of skiers, and brought many new people into the sport.  The future of skiing has never looked brighter.  Am I right?  I don't have a clue, I haven't seen any data.

 

 Um, yes, the data is there.

 

http://www.mrablog.com/explaining-ski-industry-demographics/

 

Summary- ski visits are increasing, but there are less total skiers (skiing more days), the average age is increasing, and the percentage of those skiers under age 35 is DECLINING.

 

This all points to the idea that it has never been cheaper to ski for an established skier enjoying great pass deals that allow them to affordably ski 50 times a year, but there is also a growing barrier to entry for the sport.

 

post #22 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

 If I were to go out west and such I would easily need $10k+ a year for skiing expenses...and that would be taking it easy; not splurging.  

 

WHAT?! I pretty much exclusively ski "out West," and my annual ski expenses don't come anywhere near $10,000. I usually have to fly, too.

 

But, I'm not a lazy/uninformed consumer. I shop hard for the best deals. I pack my own lunches. I spent some bucks on my own gear, but it's nice not having that daily expense anymore. There are still places with reasonable ticket prices, too. Besides, as many have pointed out, you can ski CO cheap (if you're skiing your rear off) with the CO/Epic pass.
 

WINDOW prices at:

Taos (discount season, end of March, beginning of April) - $48, $31 for children, $38 for teens/military/seniors.

Wolf Creek - $52, $28 for kids/seniors, $31 for military

Loveland - $47 early season (usually similar late season), FREE for kids under 5, $22 for kids up to 14.

 

Those places are all a heck of a lot of fun to ski at, AND are quite reasonably priced. I also enjoy the big name resorts, but if cost is going to keep you and your family from skiing, venture out a bit! But seriously...$10,000?! Sheesh! With that budget, I could go to Valdez, AK for some heli-skiing, and still have tons left over to tour the nation skiing all over the place. Ask some of the bums. If you really wanna ski that bad, a bit of determination is all you need. I've been able to do most of my skiing on a shoestring budget.

post #23 of 310
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramzee View Post

The big corporate ski areas no longer directly charge related to what it costs to operate a mountain. They charge what the market is prepared to pay with an eye on hitting their target skier numbers. If they hit that target they then price their food at what the market is prepared to pay to hit their target sales volume.

 

Then they run the books at the end of the year and see if they have won.

 

If the market didn't want to pay or the hill wasn't hitting it's target numbers they would lower prices.  Sounds like the market as a whole likes the price.

 

If they raise ticket prices and lower skier numbers, they will also have to factor in loss of food, etc revenue. If you lower ticket prices, then you end up with too many on the hill and excessive lift lines and a poor customer satisfaction record.

 

 

I have always had the feeling there is a better way, and the resort that finds it will be laughing all the way to the bank.

 

Lots of independent hills out there that do just fine doing what they do without trying to max out the profit.... they have never expanded, built a real-estate business or hotels, etc.... But people love then because they feel they get value, service, friendliness, etc, etc....


I think the big corporate areas don't consider themselves companies focused on skiing, rather they consider themselves real estate developers. The mountain only exists to sell expensive little boxes at the base.

 

Meanwhile, the day skier gets to fund the next round of base improvements to build new boxes where they used to park, thus they get the fun of parking 5 miles away from the lift.

 

While the season pass skier generates the ski visits and concession revenue to pay for the lift operation, the profit of the area is thrown onto the back of the people in the position of paying window ticket prices- new skiers who don't understand where/how to score the cheap tix, and out of state vacationers.

 

I don't see that this model is sustainable.

 

At the same time, the smaller ski areas that don't have base developments (and in Colorado, the primary reason a ski area does not have megacondos at the base is because the base is on forest service land), don't have ridiculous real estate sales to finance expansion, and thus are at a competitive disadvantage, even though they are the ones providing the affordability for people entering the sport.

 

I can't see it bodes well 20 years from now when the boomers don't have knees anymore. If the next generation of skiers hasn't materialized, where does the sport go?

 


 

post #24 of 310
Thread Starter 

Austin,

 

If you like skiing at Loveland (and how can you not!), check this out.

 

http://www.coloradoski.com/page/colorado-gems-card

 

$39 tickets to Loveland every day of the season.

 

You also get free tix to Cooper and Monarch, and many 2 for 1's. Use this guy once, and it pays for itself.

 

I always pick one of these up to add variety to wherever I get a season pass.

 

post #25 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post



 Um, yes, the data is there.

 

http://www.mrablog.com/explaining-ski-industry-demographics/

 

Summary- ski visits are increasing, but there are less total skiers (skiing more days), the average age is increasing, and the percentage of those skiers under age 35 is DECLINING.

 

This all points to the idea that it has never been cheaper to ski for an established skier enjoying great pass deals that allow them to affordably ski 50 times a year, but there is also a growing barrier to entry for the sport.

 


That's the conclusion that this person made.  But without looking at the raw data, it's not clear if it's a valid conclusion or not.  He states that the % of older skiers has increased from 97/98 to 06/07.  However, elsewhere he states that this is partially because the baby boomer generation (the largest and wealthiest generation in history) is reaching retirement age.  Nowhere does he include the raw numbers by age group for 97/98 and 06/07.  So we're left to wonder, are fewer young people skiing like he says?  Or is it just that more old people have more time to ski, and are changing the distribution.

 

I don't disagree that there's a growing barrier to entry in the sport, as I said, it's an expensive sport.  However, it's still not clear if that growing barrier is actually keeping more people from taking up the sport.

post #26 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

Austin,

If you like skiing at Loveland (and how can you not!), check this out.

http://www.coloradoski.com/page/colorado-gems-card

$39 tickets to Loveland every day of the season.

You also get free tix to Cooper and Monarch, and many 2 for 1's. Use this guy once, and it pays for itself.

I always pick one of these up to add variety to wherever I get a season pass.

 

WOH! Sweet! This is especially good timing, since I'll be headed up there in a few weeks. I was planning on hitting up Loveland and A-Basin for a few days anyway, so this baby will definitely be worth it! Thanks for the info!
 

post #27 of 310

The trick to cheap skiing is you have to be able to do it close to home. As sone as you have to fly and stay the costs get big fast. Not everyone can string 4 weeks in a row to find cheap digs and only 1 flight. ( Look out UL im heading for your couch ,oh ya can ya pick me up at the airport?)

When LS and I had the kids at home we lived close to a hill and chose to teach part time to get free passes for the kids, pro deals and visitor ticks at other resorts.

If all I wanted to ski was at NC resorts I could do the 2 of us for about 2500 a year. As soon as you add the travel bang the prices go up, so I guess its all were uyou are happy skiing if you are on a budget. Richies friends arnt spending a ton. a room is 100 bucks a night easy plus your food and getting to the hill and.....

10,000 is not an unrealistic number at all ( thats about my budget for the 2 of us)

post #28 of 310
OH and while Im here and I know RR is reading this thread SPEND SOME OF YOU SKI SHECKLES GOING TO THE GATHERING IN APRIL!!! WE WILL DRINK SCOTCH!JWB
post #29 of 310

it takes me 7 days of skiing to pay for my season pass at my local hill. as it is i have to get there at opening(9:00) and leave by noon because it just gets to crowded, i wish they would raise ticket prices to maybe reduce the amount of people. and my local hill has way more kids than any other age group by far.

post #30 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinjun View Post

it takes me 7 days of skiing to pay for my season pass at my local hill. as it is i have to get there at opening(9:00) and leave by noon because it just gets to crowded, i wish they would raise ticket prices to maybe reduce the amount of people. and my local hill has way more kids than any other age group by far.



Yup. Mostly kids here too.

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