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The Straight Ski Capital of the World

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Has to be the Midwest. Enough snow so that lots of people ski, not enough vert that people need to turn. Result: straight skis galore and difficulty explaining to people why they might want to use newer skis:

Me: See if you want to turn you simply tilt the ...

Him: Son, now why would I want to turn?

 

Other evidence: 95% of skis on craigslist here are straight skis; 75% of those listings think the skis are worth something. 15% of the listings claim that the skis were bought new 4-5 years ago. Can't these people Google "Olin"?

post #2 of 29

Come to the mid-atlantic on a snow day (the trigger reminding many people that they can ski, despite the fact that resorts are 99% dependent on manmade snow here, and natural is just a nice coating) and you'll see a lot of people blowing out the cobwebs on their ancient gear.  I don't really have an issue with people who like their old skis, but I do have a serious problem with the decrepit bindings most of them are still using.  It's really asking for trouble.  I know damn well the skis have not been serviced or checked in 15+ years just because the bindings are so far out of indemnification coverage that no reputable shop would touch them.  And these are not skiers who tune/maintain their own stuff either.

 

The funniest thing to me is how many comments I get about my "wide" skis, which are only 88-94 in the waist on a typical day, and not at all wide by modern standards.  On a powder day when I bring out the real big guns, all I get are strange looks...

post #3 of 29

Man - how did we ever ski before one could simply buy a turn with short little deep sidecut gaperskis??

 

...and I used to think I was having "fun" back then. Last Sunday @ Bohemia some old guy was ripping it up on Dynastar Coupe SL's and Lang Tii's. I'm taking out my Superforce 9's next time.

post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jer View Post. I'm taking out my Superforce 9's next time.


eek.gif Salomon makes skis???

post #5 of 29

"Straight" ski capital?  Woody Allen once said something to the effect that going both ways doubles your chances for a date on a Friday night.

post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

"Straight" ski capital?  Woody Allen once said something to the effect that going both ways doubles your chances for a date on a Friday night.


 

Let's just say that for that half of the double entendre I have no expertise in figuring out what the capital is. Everyone mostly looks the same in a ski outfit. But if I had to guess it would be Killington.

post #7 of 29

Part of it is that midwestern frugality.  "You don't really need [fill-in-the-blank with modern item].  These [fill-in-the-blank with antiquated item] work just fine mmmm hmmm."

post #8 of 29

Lots of straight skis around Sudbury ON.   One parent skiing with his young son explained it to me this way, "Maybe it is easier on the new skis, but I can turn my skis ok and I would rather spend the money on lift tickets for my son."

post #9 of 29

Pra Loup, southern French alps.  Like going into a time warp.  I think it was full of one week a year types when I visited.

post #10 of 29


Both Goodwill and Salvation Army have stopped taking in skis at all, no matter the vintage.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

Come to the mid-atlantic on a snow day (the trigger reminding many people that they can ski, despite the fact that resorts are 99% dependent on manmade snow here, and natural is just a nice coating) and you'll see a lot of people blowing out the cobwebs on their ancient gear.  I don't really have an issue with people who like their old skis, but I do have a serious problem with the decrepit bindings most of them are still using.  It's really asking for trouble.  I know damn well the skis have not been serviced or checked in 15+ years just because the bindings are so far out of indemnification coverage that no reputable shop would touch them.  And these are not skiers who tune/maintain their own stuff either.

 

The funniest thing to me is how many comments I get about my "wide" skis, which are only 88-94 in the waist on a typical day, and not at all wide by modern standards.  On a powder day when I bring out the real big guns, all I get are strange looks...


 

post #11 of 29
I was skiing yesterday at Holiday Valley in western NY when some guy gets on the chair with me. I glanced down at his skis just as we were getting on the chair and I had to do a double take as I thought at first he was on cross country skis. Upon closer examination they were an old pair of 200cm K2's, circa late 70's at best with Look Nevada bindings. He was dressed in similar clothes from the same era. Then I looked at my skis which aren't that shaped, Volkl Racetiger RC in a 173 and his skis did indeed look like cross country skis by comparison.

I couldn't even bring myself to ask him his thoughts on modern equipment. I can only imagine what he was thinking about my gear.

Rick G
post #12 of 29

Last time I skied a straight ski I thought I was going to hurt myself for reals.  It was only after a half a season skiing shaped (Rosignol Pow'Air 1999) skis.  But by that time I had subconsciously adopted the carve, and trying to turn the straight ski was terrifying.

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post
 I can only imagine what he was thinking about my gear.
 


 He probably wasn't thinking about your gear.

post #14 of 29

Middle east, remember the old video in the warren miller movie ( in the 2000's)  with everyone in rear entry boots, straight skis with bear trap bindings ect? I thought the guys skiing in muslim robes was just hillarious.

post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Lots of straight skis around Sudbury ON.   One parent skiing with his young son explained it to me this way, "Maybe it is easier on the new skis, but I can turn my skis ok and I would rather spend the money on lift tickets for my son."



Spoken like a true man in every sense of the wordicon14.gif

 

Think snow,

 

CP

post #16 of 29

This season I have seen more junk on the local hill than I have in years.  By junk I mean stuff that is much older than me (32) that at the vary least no longer safe

post #17 of 29

I got on Elan SCX the year they came out, several years before most of you gave up your straight skis. I got laughed at and a few short years later I was getting laughed at again because my skis were so old. I could use some new equipment, but I generally wait until something is broken before I replace it. I don't own wide skis and I probably never will.

 

I look at fixed heel bindings the way many of you look at straight skis. People just don't understand how much better skiing can be (when your mobility is not so severely limited).

post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post





Spoken like a true man in every sense of the wordicon14.gif

 

Think snow,

 

CP



I'll second that.. Took my daughter up today...  Might just do it again in the am depending on how I feel when I fall out of bed..  Soon as I can get her into the gates the better.. Then she can try some straight skis, sort of... J.

post #19 of 29

Haha I was just remembering my similar experience there last winter, if you take a hike over to Holimont you get a lot less of that though.  
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by rickg View Post

I was skiing yesterday at Holiday Valley in western NY when some guy gets on the chair with me. I glanced down at his skis just as we were getting on the chair and I had to do a double take as I thought at first he was on cross country skis. Upon closer examination they were an old pair of 200cm K2's, circa late 70's at best with Look Nevada bindings. He was dressed in similar clothes from the same era. Then I looked at my skis which aren't that shaped, Volkl Racetiger RC in a 173 and his skis did indeed look like cross country skis by comparison.

I couldn't even bring myself to ask him his thoughts on modern equipment. I can only imagine what he was thinking about my gear.

Rick G
On a side note: a customer bought Marker M10's last weekend and had us put them on his 30 year old straight skis.  Tried to get him to buy new ski but he wouldn't go for it, so we had him sign the legal paper work and put them on his old time skis.  Anybody ever heard of older skis breaking with new bindings?  It just doesn't seem right, but is it unsafe?
post #20 of 29

Are my old SGs safer with the old All-Metal Tyrolia 490s or with new Marker Comp 16s devil.gif

post #21 of 29

Correct answer: Marker Comp 20's, go big or go home!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Are my old SGs safer with the old All-Metal Tyrolia 490s or with new Marker Comp 16s devil.gif

post #22 of 29

There are no such things as "straight skiis".Unless you have a pair of wooden antiques that you took from your great grandmothers attic !

All modern skiis have sidecut.The newer shaped skiis simply have exaggerated sidecut and require no effort to turn,simply put them on edge and they do all the work.Now if you are a bump skier you need your knees and skiis together...right together! And pressuring the ski is a sweet and learned subtlety.Once you have it down no other sensation comes close!.If I am out on skkis they are K2 White Winter Heats or my older Olin Zero Gravity.They still carve it up ! If I want shapes....I am on the Snowshark Monoski....the sweetest carve on the hill !

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JH monoman View Post

There are no such things as "straight skiis".Unless you have a pair of wooden antiques that you took from your great grandmothers attic !

All modern skiis have sidecut.The newer shaped skiis simply have exaggerated sidecut and require no effort to turn,simply put them on edge and they do all the work.Now if you are a bump skier you need your knees and skiis together...right together! And pressuring the ski is a sweet and learned subtlety.Once you have it down no other sensation comes close!.If I am out on skkis they are K2 White Winter Heats or my older Olin Zero Gravity.They still carve it up ! If I want shapes....I am on the Snowshark Monoski....the sweetest carve on the hill !



"straight Ski" is a just a term. Don't get butthurt over it.

post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JH monoman View Post

There are no such things as "straight skiis".Unless you have a pair of wooden antiques that you took from your great grandmothers attic !

All modern skiis have sidecut.The newer shaped skiis simply have exaggerated sidecut and require no effort to turn,simply put them on edge and they do all the work.Now if you are a bump skier you need your knees and skiis together...right together! And pressuring the ski is a sweet and learned subtlety.Once you have it down no other sensation comes close!.If I am out on skkis they are K2 White Winter Heats or my older Olin Zero Gravity.They still carve it up ! If I want shapes....I am on the Snowshark Monoski....the sweetest carve on the hill !


I think the sensation of floating on deep pow beats the snot out of bumps...but to each his own.

post #25 of 29

Saw this Saturday at Peek N Peak (Western NY)

 

Head GT 344.  LOCKED, with a SKI TOTE

 

nice

 

SkiTote_AncientSkis.JPG

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JH monoman View Post

There are no such things as "straight skiis".Unless you have a pair of wooden antiques that you took from your great grandmothers attic !

All modern skiis have sidecut.The newer shaped skiis simply have exaggerated sidecut and require no effort to turn,simply put them on edge and they do all the work.Now if you are a bump skier you need your knees and skiis together...right together! And pressuring the ski is a sweet and learned subtlety.Once you have it down no other sensation comes close!.If I am out on skkis they are K2 White Winter Heats or my older Olin Zero Gravity.They still carve it up ! If I want shapes....I am on the Snowshark Monoski....the sweetest carve on the hill !


 

I think for the purpose of discussion, "straight ski" refers to anything with a sidecut radius over 30 meters


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post




I think the sensation of floating on deep pow beats the snot out of bumps...but to each his own.


How about floating on powder early then skiing bumps and crud on straight skis later in the day?   Granted, they are 91mm under foot and a bit cumbersome in the bumps compared to an F17 WC.  Fat AND straight skis can do both   Red and Black RDs second from the left..What do you do, go home after lunch when skiing gets hard?th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

19711434_IMG_2143-1.jpg

post #27 of 29

I do see a good number of older folks here in NE Ohio skiing on old, thin, long, straight skis.  These folks to old-fashioned swivel-hipped skid-to-skid turns.  I always like it when some of the same people are wearing retro one-piece suits.  It is a blast from the past.

 

But what there is much more of is twin-tip/park/WIDE-ass flat skis on people running the groomers.  95% of these folks never visit the park or even do small jumps.   It is beyond me why they purchase skis like that for groomer-riding (is it for the graphics???)

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




 

I think for the purpose of discussion, "straight ski" refers to anything with a sidecut radius over 30 meters


 


How about floating on powder early then skiing bumps and crud on straight skis later in the day?   Granted, they are 91mm under foot and a bit cumbersome in the bumps compared to an F17 WC.  Fat AND straight skis can do both   Red and Black RDs second from the left..What do you do, go home after lunch when skiing gets hard?th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif

 

19711434_IMG_2143-1.jpg


How about a fat pow ski that busts crud?

 

post #29 of 29
I happen to like the way my Twin Tips feel on groomers, and on ice. Very stable, and extremely easy in short radius turns. I never go to the park because my knees won't tolerate the impact of dropping off at the end of a rail or table.
The best way to ski a mountain like Hunter, which is often a sheet of ice from top to bottom, is to turn your skis sideways as you get off the lift, and jib the whole way down.
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