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Question for the over 50 crowd - Page 3

post #61 of 83

I stopped getting better a few years ago when the effect of bad knees negated the improvements in skis.  Also, aging means I am weaker and that means arcing fast turns on GS boards  in frozen snow while others are skidding may someday become a thing of the past.  The good news is that fatter/rockered skis make skiing powder and crud easy.  The bad news is my kids, 7 and 10, are now both on the double Ds and there will be at the point in a few years where I won't be able to keep up.  Well, there is always the Steadman Clinic to keep me on the snow for a few more years.  If the knees hurt too much, there is also x-country skiing to enjoy.  We all age differently.  Regardless, you have to keep on going (or die).

post #62 of 83

"........I have learned that every turn is precious."........that is so true.....i have often thought that one is issued only so many in a lifetime and they ought not to be wasted!

post #63 of 83



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

lol.   So that's why matzoh looks like that!

 ROTF.gif ROTF.gif ROTF.gifROTF.gifROTF.gif
 

These are the Israelites laughing their touchases off.

Matzoh really does look like crispy corduroy.

D
 


Edited by deliberate1 - 2/17/11 at 4:00pm
post #64 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hen3x View Post

"........I have learned that every turn is precious."........that is so true.....i have often thought that one is issued only so many in a lifetime and they ought not to be wasted!


I have always said the same thing about bumps. There are only so many bump runs left in these old knees. Long ago (in my 30's) I stopped skiing bumps all day long and started savoring the ones I am still able to do. However I always try t o get in at least one bump run every time I ski, no matter what the conditions just to stay sharp.

Concerning ski skills, I believe you got to use them or lose them.

Rick G
post #65 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by hen3x View Post

"........I have learned that every turn is precious."........that is so true.....i have often thought that one is issued only so many in a lifetime and they ought not to be wasted!




I have always said the same thing about bumps. There are only so many bump runs left in these old knees. Long ago (in my 30's) I stopped skiing bumps all day long and started savoring the ones I am still able to do. However I always try t o get in at least one bump run every time I ski, no matter what the conditions just to stay sharp.

Concerning ski skills, I believe you got to use them or lose them.

Rick G


+1.  Although I'm not trying to stay sharp, just trying to get sharpfrown.gifconfused.gif.

 

Think snow,

 

CP

post #66 of 83

I'm 61, started skiing when I was 40, my mind is making up for all those lost years,my body is trying to keep up with my mind.  I try to pick something in my skiing every year to work on and improve. I only hope I don't run out of body

post #67 of 83

Maybe with age comes loss of memory with me, I cant remember my bad turns ( hehehe  ya right)

post #68 of 83

I've been skiing 40 years, and feel my skiing continues to improve, if incrementally. I'm skiing faster, on gnarlier terrain, and in more conditions then at any time in my life. More importantly I long ago realized I was never going to be perfect so even though most of the first 25 years of my ski life was spent on Minnesota hills of under 300 vertical I've never gotten bored.  I look at it like I look at each season. I usually start off skiing OK, then as I work out what I want to work on and how to do it my skiing slowly falls apart until sometime in January when I've mostly stopped doing the old automatic responses I'm trying to change, but still have to think my way through what I want to do instead. About now I'm starting to feel better about the changes I'm making and start picking it up until around late March/early April when general fatigue starts to wear me down and I have to start thinking again. Physically things ebb and flow but mentally It stays a joyful challenge. I ski with less fatigue now then ever, and it's not because of zealous attention to conditioning or mindlessly backing of from terrain or condition challenges.

 

I feel the biggest reason for my continuing improvement is teaching full time for the last 30 years. There is nothing like trying to show someone else how to do something to learn it yourself. It has made me spend more time in the woods and in terrain parks then I probably would have if I didn't have clients who wanted to play in those parts of my office.  Part of what I've learned is not to limit the meaning of improvement.  If I get to the end of the day knowing I've gotten more out of my potential for that day I'll count that as better even if it's quantitatively less (slower, lower, whatever) then I've previously done. The other big driver of my continuing improvement is changing equipment, only I don't mean shapes or lengths. When snowboarding was first allowed where I was working in the mid 80's I started teaching that and felt a big jump in my alpine skiing. A decade ago I started Tele skiing and have felt another big step forward in understanding how both skis and my body works. Now I'm doing more playing around on really short (110) tele skis in my woods at home and adding a new awareness of touch in widely varying snow conditions. 

 

Bumps are my particular muse the way some people are drawn to chasing sticks or bigger air. My goal in my 20s was to still be skiing bumps when I was in my 70s. To that end I started to learn low impact ways to ski, and how to get the most out of whatever ski or snow I'm on with the least amount of force possible. As the hardware stops improving I find that constantly upgrading the software is the best way forward. Now that I've met several 70+ bump skiers and 80+ skiers I've decided maybe I should shoot for skiing bumps in my 80s.

post #69 of 83

I think bump skiing when you have weak bones and weaker connective tissue is an astronomically bad idea, unfortunately, if they are major moguls anyway; (as in 70 - 80years old)th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

As arcing, carving, and GS boards are way over-rated. Hey, it's your life, yet you guys sound like you are still under pressure to prove something. If not now when??? Ski as you like, enjoy and be safe. Change is natural and you should not now feel compelled to ski any particular way beyond how you want to ski. Leave the pressure cooker to the kids.

post #70 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

Maybe with age comes loss of memory with me, I cant remember my bad turns ( hehehe  ya right)


So brother Boot are you trying to say that every one of your turns is forgettable?PS this message is coming to you from the Denver airport-off to Vail for two whole weeks with Ms D1, Bazz, SMJ, Rick and whatever other Bears come out of their caves.
post #71 of 83

Learned how to ski in the mid '60s - fond memories for sure. The equipment is getting better and better, making up for some of the physical deficits like worn, aching knees, crump in back, lacking flexibility and strength ect. as limiting factors. Very apparent while shredding (at least trying) with folks who could be my kids - while they huck and mostly stomp the big cliffs I find myself skiing around them more often than I like in order to keep my ligaments intact.

 

Am I getting better? Hell no, just trying to preserve current shape as best as I can. I just wish I'd be 30 years younger but with TODAY'S equipment on my feet.

 

All that said it's sometimes amazing how many drilled monkeys of all age only survive in the backcountry because of modern fat skis - they would be screwed when suddenly being on early '90s skinny planks.

post #72 of 83

I am 63, started skiing at age 29 and never skied more than 18 days in a year. I found that it would take me 4 or 5 days each new season to get back to where I was at the end of the last season and some times longer.

 

I think that by the time I was in my late 30's I peaked and it has all been down hill from there. I eventually made the transition to carvers but still prefer longer skis. I guess I really stopped making any major improvements around 38.

 

Nowadays I am just glad to be in the mountains and my knees prefer well looked after pistes, or groomers as you call them over here.

 

I was in A Basin yesterday, the sun was shining and I enjoyed Pali Main Street but it was in nice condition.

post #73 of 83


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I think bump skiing when you have weak bones and weaker connective tissue is an astronomically bad idea, unfortunately, if they are major moguls anyway; (as in 70 - 80years old)th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

As arcing, carving, and GS boards are way over-rated. Hey, it's your life, yet you guys sound like you are still under pressure to prove something. If not now when??? Ski as you like, enjoy and be safe. Change is natural and you should not now feel compelled to ski any particular way beyond how you want to ski. Leave the pressure cooker to the kids.

 

True enough things breakdown as you age. However I'm not talking pounding the zipper line. Not only do I find that a far too stressful to keep up all day, I personally find it rather ugly and choppy to watch. To flow down the mountain is the feeling I seek. There are more types of turns available, and called for, (and thus more ways to ride the flow) in a mogul field then anywhere else on the mountain.  The only person I feel pressured to prove anything to is myself. I always have skied the way I like--Probably why I had to try out twice and was a provisional hire at my first instructing job.

 

In any case as you say don't feel to compelled to ski any particular way beyond how you want to ski. If for some reason that includes jumping off cliffs, or pounding gates, or zipper lining the bumps, straight lining the vortex of pain, or just generally acting like a testosterone poisoned fool, whatever your age, Have at it and have a ball.    

post #74 of 83

fine, but you will be injured, no question, unless you're bombing around is really only fast in your own (delusionalwink.gif) mind, and you're really just noodling. Or you have unusual skills, which opens any door way into the years ahead.

 

It's like intermediates (any age, but more so with an old skeletal system) who do as they please, (and are of course free to do), and ignore lessons as a way to develop. fine, but you will become broken soon enough, the downside of self-taught that is often not considered. ski right (lessons), or ski hurt.

post #75 of 83
Thread Starter 
I don't know how old I'll be when I have to give up bumps. But I do intend on finding out! cool.gif

Rick G
post #76 of 83

I suck at bumps, but because of the rlatively slow speed in bumps compared to most of my other skiing, find them a pretty safe bet for not getting injured. 

post #77 of 83

I am 50 and still learning and though I don't have the agility of years past, I don't ski like an old fart!  My goal is to be an old fart and still skiing!

post #78 of 83

I'll be 54 in a few weeks. My skiing is, I believe, measurably changing and getting much better.  Of course, I'm a serious student of the sport, and spend a considerable amount of time with top instructors trying to increase my mastery of the sport.

 

I do not understand people who think they have nothing left to learn in a sport.  Even Bode Miller and Lindsey Vonn have coaches who work with them on their technique and tactics.  I feel that there will always be something for me to learn, to work on in my skiing.  I skied this last week with Jim Schanzenbaker, a member of the PSIA national demo team.  He works on stuff in his skiing every season. 

 

There is no doubt htat my skiing has been positively affected by changes in my physical conditioning.  Over the past 2 years, I've lost 60 pounds, and moved from a somewhat fit but morbidly overweight state to a seriously fit but still overweight status.  I ride my bike over 5000 miiles a year during cycling season (March-October).  It's provided a great base for skiing.

 

But not all of my gains in skiing can be attributed to my conditioning.  I'm convinced that my taking skiing seriously, investing in learning about it and attempting to improve, is the primary reason my skiing has improved.  

 

If I didin't study my skiing, having a coach diagnose what is going on, then the physical deterioration of age might overcome my skiing ability.  But I think that one can always improve given the physical endowment that one has.  It's just a matter of keeping the rate of progress greater than the rate of physical regress.

 

Mike

 

(getting ready to hang the skis up for another season of building the body for next season through cycling -- cycling season begins March 14).

post #79 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowHog View Post

I just wish I'd be 30 years younger but with TODAY'S equipment on my feet.

 


Amen Brother! cool.gif And the chicks were hotter back then too. At least the ones who would look at me. LOL

Rick G
post #80 of 83

I'm 48 and am better now than ever and have progressed steadily over the last 5-10 years. Yeah, the equipment makes it easier but I try to stay in decent shape and I think that helps. Far too many guys our age are just out of shape. Also helps that my teenage kids push me to keep up with them and I think that more than anything has made me focus more and keep improving my skills. We ski Mary Jane pretty much exclusively these days having a place in Fraser, CO and it keeps me on my game. Some damn good bump skiers at The Jane.

 

Keep up the shreading.

post #81 of 83

I was skiing with a good friend at Copper last weekend... after watching him ski beautifully in the early morning snow, we sat talking waiting for lineup. It was during our conversation that I was reminded when he mentioned to another, "Yes, I'm 81."

 

Wow!

 

Yes, he's not skiing as far or as hard as some of us may, but he's still finding things to improve. He was asking me to watch his skiing and give him input! He's one of my heros, and I want to continue to find things to improve for the rest of my life, and pray that I die skiing on a powder morning... snowfalling.gif

post #82 of 83

I am swiftly approaching 50..at 47 now. While I am skiing better than I ever skied in my teens and 20's, the one area that I noticed that I don't have any more is comfort in the air. I will tend to absorb a bump or jump now where I used to pop off of them. I am fine with the air off of a cornice but not a kicker type jump. Granted I never did what these kids are doing in the parks today..we never conceived of these possibilities in the 70's and 80's. 

post #83 of 83

I'm now old enough to collect social security.  I'm a Tahoe skier that has always made that 3 to 5 hour commute from the land of jobs west. So not a local resort region skier that regularly gets lots of short days in simply because its close and convenient.  My ski life didn't really start until my late twenties mainly because I had been a poor young peon.   Until one can afford it and starts committing to double digits days each year they really can't expect much in advanced skill.  Several seasons I've been between jobs enjoying as much skiing as I wanted.   However recently during 2008 thru 2010 I skied just 2 days and during this 2011 season have just 4 days and only expect maybe 3 more.  The issue these last 4 seasons has simply been about being too poor to afford it since my finances tanked.  That has of course been aggravated during this last decade as gas, lodging, and lift ticket prices have jacked way up.   But now I'm back financially and this summer will get another cheap season pass and likely get my usual 20 or so days in for 2012.

 

So what about my skiing abilities?  What do I now expect?   Will my recent skiing drought take me down a notch or three?  My middle aged experience the last couple decades is not what I expected as a twenty something. Back then we all thought anyone over 40 would rapidly go down hill and many that age at the time looked it.

 

Well although I didn't ski much the last few years, I've still been very active hiking and backpacking  often carrying exceptionally heavy loads.   So year after year in my adult life I've been very physically active.   I think that is one key to longevity once one reaches middle age.   Use it or lose it. On my first day skiing this winter, I had no issue cranking quick short swing turns from the get go.   On my second morning skied about 10k feet of groomed intermediate to advanced pitch slopes without ever stopping at all.   Then on my third day skiing this season on run 4 was able to ski non stop down the fall line through about 800 vertical feet of moderate size 45% grade moguls.  Even in my early 30s although I was much stronger and more resilliant, I could not do that.  So why?   Well years and years of making turns and momentary decisions of where to turn on terrain is strongly wired into my brain. As a young skier I had to re-learn much of my technique each season the first several days while once I reached middle age I found I could ski at a high level more quickly each season.  It just took several weeks early in each season to build up strength so my body could do what my mind wanted.

 

Two of the main limitations of middle age are staying power on ski days and recovery after a hard day of skiing.  What I cannot do like I did as a twentysomething even in mid season after my muscels get in the animal mode is ski all day at an advanced level.  Thus ski shorter days and know when to bail when the best has passed each day.  And second it sometimes takes days to recover after a hard weekend skiing.  Thus some reason to accept being a weekend warrior allowing a few days for recovery instead of all day all week long.  

Another issue is we don't all age at the same rate. Genetics is obviously part of it.

 

Those who looked mature for their age in late teens are now often paying the price of looking and feeling older than their peers.   And those of us who matured late often appear younger looking than our peers.   I'm one of the later though in some ways have aged just like my other peers.  I now need reading glasses and tend to forget people's names I haven't seen in awhile haha.   But I have no tire around the middle, fat ass, nor many gray hairs.  Can still move smoothly like a dancer.  And lifestyle and diet too. Staying away from much greasy meaty foods. Drinking little alcohol and for skiers that means all that beer.  Taking care of one's skin while outdoors, almost never getting sunburned.  Also less stressful life is important.  All these things add up by middle age and can take their toll.  At my 50th HS reunuion there were many that looked as old as I expect to at maybe 70.  In any case my day of being aging limited will eventually come too.  We are all mortal and a mere millenium from now all will be dust as dust we came.

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