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Parenting: What do you do?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Sorry folks, I know there are probably a ton of posts on this but I thought it would be good to resurrect the topic.

 

So this weekend my 7 year old daughter and I hit the slopes. It was an epic day because she jumped a good two or three "levels" in her ability. She's been hitting easier double blacks off of the North Face Lift here in CB and skiing the other blacks for a while. But on Sunday, her aggression was over the top. She was ripping steep black groomers like International and Crystal top to bottom. She was carving so well that on more than one occasion I noticed her inside hand almost touching the snow (turns out she was doing it on purpose). I had trouble actually staying in her trenches at times. She was jumping off of anything and even dropped a small 8 footer twice. We skied until 4pm and at the end of the day my legs were actually tired. A first for skiing with my kids.

 

That's everything that we as parents dream about right? I spent some time during the day giving her pointers about bumps and carving etc but I didn't spend that much time giving her lessons on safety. At one point she was carving huge GS turns down International and my GPS basically clocked her going 30. The slope was empty so it wasn't a concern but in retrospect, I realized that I should have been at least walking her through danger/threat assessment.

 

I don't want to be a buzz kill but I feel that unless I spend some time telling her how to make good decisions I am just arming her with the skills to do damage to her or someone else. My sister suggested having a discussion at the top of each run about what to remember and what to watch out for. Good idea, but does anyone else have any routines or things they do?

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 11

I like your sister's suggestion...with higher skier density here in Summit and a 7 year old who is making progress but a few levels below yours, I mostly remind her to look uphill when runs merge or she pops out onto a run from the trees.  With merging runs, if I am in the lead I will exaggerate my look uphill and point uphill with my polls.  If she is close enough I will say look up/look forward, up/forward... 

 

I think teaching good habits takes repetition of the message, but once they start doing it correctly, you can praise them instead of nag them.  

post #3 of 11

yeah, I don't think the lecturing is necessary if she is normally a girl with her head on her shoulders (your parenting already), so to speak. That sort of speed in and of itself is a danger to no one, her included. come to think of it, I never warned my son when teaching him, instead giving him positive suggestions and ideas. They seem to have a great natural self preservation instinct and lacking adults driving ego, act in the interest of fun. It is even possible that you could become the "buzz kill" and have less time with your daughter for it.

post #4 of 11


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

yeah, I don't think the lecturing is necessary if she is normally a girl with her head on her shoulders (your parenting already), so to speak. That sort of speed in and of itself is a danger to no one, her included. come to think of it, I never warned my son when teaching him, instead giving him positive suggestions and ideas. They seem to have a great natural self preservation instinct and lacking adults driving ego, act in the interest of fun. It is even possible that you could become the "buzz kill" and have less time with your daughter for it.


Like anything in parenting, it's balancing the not enough and the  too much. When mine were elementary ages, I spent most of my time focusing on when to stop (not in a blind spot, not in the entrance to the lift maze, etc.) and when to go (look uphill and around you first, slowly out of the trees, etc.). In the past few years, it's been more on where to go (and not go) -- but I don't do much how to go.

 

The other things I try to hammer home involve trees: near them, don't go fast, especially if a groomer is wide open! why ski fast near the trees? in them, don't follow too close, but always have a buddy; under them, that's a tree well, stay out; and, uh, on them, a helmet won't help you if hit one.

post #5 of 11

I can read your unbelievable driving record into the type of instructions you imparted to your child. She will no doubt be a responsible skier.

post #6 of 11

With my son, I have tried to pound in the idea that skiing fast near the edges of trails is dangerous and needs to be treated with respect.  I have been a bit of a broken record about "expert skier on a blue groomer" being the most common fatal accident.  I have never attempted (or wanted) to forbid that kind of skiing, but I have attempted to get him to treat it with respect and pay attention. (Who knows if any of it sinks in?).

 

When he was younger I was pretty explicit about traffic management advice.

post #7 of 11

Lectures aren't necessary, nor are they effective. You gave pointers on technique, give the same type of pointers on safety. "Hey, just watch your speed with these crowds." "Make sure you check uphill before you take off." Things like that. More importantly than that, lead by example. If your kids see you doing it, they'll do it too. It's not at all a buzz kill. Getting hurt or getting a pass pulled (more likely for the kids when they become high schoolers) is a much bigger buzz kill than learning to be safe.

post #8 of 11

Skip the lectures.

 

Enjoy the day.

 

It is ok to mention in passing, at some other time, that you did worry about what might happen if she ever was involved in a collision at that speed and maybe have a discussion about it, but don't expect kids of that age to have an appreciation of risk.  Don't over emphasize it or you might just achieve the opposite result, kid enjoying the power of scaring mommy and daddy by skiing scary fast.  Fortunately for me, my kids were a lot more sensible than I was.  Boy did my folks go through a lot!

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys. Good feedback. I'm going to start working the safety stuff into just our normal "fun". I like the one about not skiing on the edge of groomers. Oddly enough, I had just instructed her to look to the edge of groomers to avoid ice late in the day. 'Doh! Really appreciate all the feedback!

 

Que

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Que View Post

 Oddly enough, I had just instructed her to look to the edge of groomers to avoid ice late in the day. 'Doh!


Nothing wrong with that, just don't go fast at that point. It's a good place to avoid crowds too.

post #11 of 11

Never go completely to the edge; always leave just enough room for someone to slip by between you and the trees/cliff/rockface/whatever at the side of the run.

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