New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tactics for Bumps - Page 5

post #121 of 132

Lars sounds like we agree to me. Why is there little talk about floating today? All you here today the only way to carve is to make rail road tracks in the snow in a 30 to 40 meter radius. Wrong.

 

 SL skiers carve rail road tracks and carve with a feather at the top of the turn many times in a SL race. If the ski is loaded from the tip and ridden to the tail it will create rebound thus the tip and tail follow the same path resulting in a arc, it is carving.

post #122 of 132

Video of carving turns SL & GS.

 

 

post #123 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvj View Post

Lars sounds like we agree to me. Why is there little talk about floating today? All you here today the only way to carve is to make rail road tracks in the snow in a 30 to 40 meter radius. Wrong.

 

 SL skiers carve rail road tracks and carve with a feather at the top of the turn many times in a SL race. If the ski is loaded from the tip and ridden to the tail it will create rebound thus the tip and tail follow the same path resulting in a arc, it is carving.



I really do think we agree on many issues cvj. I've been trying to ski like you for the past 30 years why wouldn't we?

 

Really, I think there's still alot of "Old School" in our styles, and because we learned how to ski bumps so long ago before modern carving equipment became the dominant mode, we still realize the "float factor"easier than those who didn't learn using up and down weigh movements in the turn phase.

 

True bump skiing has become a lost art.

 

post #124 of 132

I was at Killington a week ago and had a chance to think about this discussion while skiing and watching others.  The Killington School was there next to the Bear Mt. chair and we could observe from the chair their way of bumping.  They are competition bumpers.  It was a lot of fun and educational.  Plenty of slip sliding, but some carving too - carving based on my definition - carving in the bumps.

 

There was also a practice section with a long, flat, somewhat icy stretch between bumps.  This was a course where the athletes practiced slipping into a bump.  There was also a ramp type bump where ariels were being practiced.

 

Little kids, some looked as young a 5 were rippin it up - very impressive.

 

But the best part of the day from the stand point of this discussion was the opportunity to ski Devil's Fiddle with the team.  They were freeskiing with their coach and the bumps were natural and east coast treacherous.  I like this type of terrain.  Anyway, they were going one at a time in an informal contest.  They were amazing and their style adapted nicely to the nasty terrain.  Competition bump skiing does translate to other situations based on what I saw at Killington.  These guys, girls included, could turn and the turns were solid and functional.  They tended to stay toward the upper part of the bump the entire time - quick feet too.

 

One of the girls won because of her air!

 

I still prefer rounded turns with edge set and bent ski.  But for me mixing it up is where it's at.  There is no doubt based on what I saw that this style is functional in natural terrain.

post #125 of 132


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

I was at Killington a week ago and had a chance to think about this discussion while skiing and watching others.  The Killington School was there next to the Bear Mt. chair and we could observe from the chair their way of bumping.  They are competition bumpers.  It was a lot of fun and educational.  Plenty of slip sliding, but some carving too - carving based on my definition - carving in the bumps.

 

There was also a practice section with a long, flat, somewhat icy stretch between bumps.  This was a course where the athletes practiced slipping into a bump.  There was also a ramp type bump where ariels were being practiced.

 

Little kids, some looked as young a 5 were rippin it up - very impressive.

 

But the best part of the day from the stand point of this discussion was the opportunity to ski Devil's Fiddle with the team.  They were freeskiing with their coach and the bumps were natural and east coast treacherous.  I like this type of terrain.  Anyway, they were going one at a time in an informal contest.  They were amazing and their style adapted nicely to the nasty terrain.  Competition bump skiing does translate to other situations based on what I saw at Killington.  These guys, girls included, could turn and the turns were solid and functional.  They tended to stay toward the upper part of the bump the entire time - quick feet too.

 

One of the girls won because of her air!

 

I still prefer rounded turns with edge set and bent ski.  But for me mixing it up is where it's at.  There is no doubt based on what I saw that this style is functional in natural terrain.

Paul, I have seen these kids every time I have been at Killington in the last few years, whether its early season with little to no bumps up on north ridge triple or middle to late season over at Bear Mt. watching them practice the one main thing I see in all of them is a stable, disciplined upper body. If they are practicing pivot slips or zipper line skiing it is the same thing disciplined upper body. Watching those kids has got me working more towards that. They are incredible athletes.
 

 

post #126 of 132


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

I was at Killington a week ago and had a chance to think about this discussion while skiing and watching others.  The Killington School was there next to the Bear Mt. chair and we could observe from the chair their way of bumping.  They are competition bumpers.  It was a lot of fun and educational.  Plenty of slip sliding, but some carving too - carving based on my definition - carving in the bumps.

 

There was also a practice section with a long, flat, somewhat icy stretch between bumps.  This was a course where the athletes practiced slipping into a bump.  There was also a ramp type bump where ariels were being practiced.

 

Little kids, some looked as young a 5 were rippin it up - very impressive.

 

But the best part of the day from the stand point of this discussion was the opportunity to ski Devil's Fiddle with the team.  They were freeskiing with their coach and the bumps were natural and east coast treacherous.  I like this type of terrain.  Anyway, they were going one at a time in an informal contest.  They were amazing and their style adapted nicely to the nasty terrain.  Competition bump skiing does translate to other situations based on what I saw at Killington.  These guys, girls included, could turn and the turns were solid and functional.  They tended to stay toward the upper part of the bump the entire time - quick feet too.

 

One of the girls won because of her air!

 

I still prefer rounded turns with edge set and bent ski.  But for me mixing it up is where it's at.  There is no doubt based on what I saw that this style is functional in natural terrain.


I really like the flat ski until they hit the mogul.

 

post #127 of 132

 I think doing the charleston has help me ski the bumps better. ( short turns on inside ski while the heal of the outside ski is kicked up & to the side if done fast it will make your legs look like rubber) Once this gets easy poles can be held togeather & swirled around body & or spun out in front.

 

 Single poleing to one side for several then double pole both poles plant on outside ski side. This can also be done with the charelston

 

 When skiing powder that is not to deep or corn snow on the top of the porpuse @ the same time as extending legs drive the hips foreward over the knees driving the tip down into the snow. ( of course not recomended for deep powder)

 

 Practice spiraled turns ( golden spiral shaped)

 

Slide slips not only on both skis but on inside & outside ski

 

 Many skiers can ski well on the outside ski but not as well on the inside ski. If a skier can ski well on the inside ski well as well as outside they can ski on both skis well when feet togeather in bumps. ( one legged turns)

post #128 of 132

Hello,

 

   I'm new here.  I have this question which I want to ask forever and this might be the thread to do it.  The question is this.  When I do the pivot turn on top of the mogul and then pull my feet back to keep the ski tip on the snow on the back side of the mogul, I would just shoot out real fast and traverse a few moguls before I could do another pivot.  Is my edge to hard on the back of the mogul?  Do I need to make my edge softer on the back of the mogul to slip down?  If that is the case, how do I make the edge softer on the back side of the moguls?  Do I roll my knees out to flatten the skis on the backside of the moguls.  Sorry for all these questions.  Newbie mogul enthusiast here.

 

 

post #129 of 132

If I understand you right, this is the point when you need to push your tips back down into the snow and ride the edges down the backside as you stand/extend into the next bump.The combination helps you control speed and keep you out of the backseat which is the reason you are jetting.

 

A little pivot of the feet will give you all the edge you need as you change direction to the next turn. Quick feet, quick hands

post #130 of 132

 

Quote:
thepgranule wrote:
The question is this.  When I do the pivot turn on top of the mogul and then pull my feet back to keep the ski tip on the snow on the back side of the mogul, I would just shoot out real fast and traverse a few moguls before I could do another pivot.

 

Without video, I'm guessing your biggest problem results from trying to ski moguls before actually learning how to ski, make short turns or even smooth pivots on the groomed.  This is resulting in your inability to keep ski pressure balanced or forward and keeping your body square to the fall line.  You get "backseat" as you pivot, because you are hopping and twisting your skis with your shoulders/upper body leading the pivot.  When you come down, your skis and shoulders are perpendicular to the fall line because you are not keeping your hands forward, reaching down the hill with your new pole plant, your weight shifts back to your tails as your hands are at your hips or even behind you, in an attempt to skid instantly to gain speed control.  This is why you are constantly jetting and traversing across a couple of moguls, it takes you this long to regain your balance and time your next hop to pivot.

 

My 1st suggestion is to develop a decent QCT on the groomed, keeping your shoulders square to the fall line.  As you work on this, you will probably first learn how to pivot properly as you learn how to make quick turns.  Good luck and stick with it.  Remember, keep your body square to the fall line and reach down hill.

 

 

post #131 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post

 

 

Without video, I'm guessing your biggest problem results from trying to ski moguls before actually learning how to ski, make short turns or even smooth pivots on the groomed.  This is resulting in your inability to keep ski pressure balanced or forward and keeping your body square to the fall line.  You get "backseat" as you pivot, because you are hopping and twisting your skis with your shoulders/upper body leading the pivot.  When you come down, your skis and shoulders are perpendicular to the fall line because you are not keeping your hands forward, reaching down the hill with your new pole plant, your weight shifts back to your tails as your hands are at your hips or even behind you, in an attempt to skid instantly to gain speed control.  This is why you are constantly jetting and traversing across a couple of moguls, it takes you this long to regain your balance and time your next hop to pivot.

 

My 1st suggestion is to develop a decent QCT on the groomed, keeping your shoulders square to the fall line.  As you work on this, you will probably first learn how to pivot properly as you learn how to make quick turns.  Good luck and stick with it.  Remember, keep your body square to the fall line and reach down hill.

 

 



I think you might be a little hard on the poster Nail. He may be a real decent skier just looking for a tip or two to be a little more comfortable in moguls. You really don't know if he's hopping or twisting or any of that. That said, I know some really excellent skiers who can't ski moguls because they lack the confidence number one, and secondly, they are afraid to look bad when they beef it in front of the liftlines.

 

Sound basic skiing skills and a few good tips as well as some experience is really all that's needed to ski bumps.

 

You have that knowledge Nail, help the guy out.

 

 

 

post #132 of 132

 

Quote:
Lars wrote:
I think you might be a little hard on the poster Nail

 

I'm sure you'll agree Lars, MA is almost impossible without video.  I'm certainly guessing at what is actually happening, but I think I can see it.  Why, because I've been there myself?  I was not trying to be demeaning or hard on the poster at all, I'm stoked he's trying to improve his mogul skiing.   I think my comments could really help the poster if he applies them.  I'm actually looking forward to hearing how the suggestions work out.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching