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skis for trees, please

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Please suggest skis I should demo.  I want to replace my Dynastar Huge Troubles ('09 model w/ flower graphics).  These are just for powder days inbounds at Tahoe.  I love skiing the trees at Homewood when it's dumping, and the HTs are not ideal.  They hold an edge great when booking back to the lift,  they tip-and-arc great in open bowls, but they don't come around quick enough in the trees.  It's too much work and makes me nervous.  I'll trade away some stability at speed, if I must, to find skis that zip around in the trees easily.  That said, these skis need to be stable enough to cope with the chop I'll ski the day after the dump.

I'm  55 years old, 6 ft, 200 lb, pretty fit.  Decent, not great skier.  Bit too much slide and pivot in my turns; not enough carve.  I'd pick a 115 mm waist and 185 cm length unless convinced otherwise.

 

So far my list is:

 

Atomic Bent Chetler

Dynastar 6th Sense Huge (rocker)

Armada JJ

Ski Logik Howitzer (Bomb Squad?)

Rossi S7

 

I realize some of these are sold out, and that next year will bring changes.  I just want to try stuff out and find skis I like.

 

Please comment on these and/or point out other skis.  TIA.

post #2 of 12
I haven't skied it, but from what I've read so far the katana should probably be on your list.
post #3 of 12

how many days a year do you ski? how strong are you? sounds like the Huge was too long (only made in a 185 that year)

 

Except for buying a special ski specifically for ripping huge bowls  and straight lining, every all mountain ski should be great for "skiing trees", AKA making  turns where you have to.

 

But if you want to isolate the characteristics in your mind, get the S7, IMO


Edited by davluri - 2/14/11 at 4:00pm
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

I only ski 10 days a year, with the majority being deep snow.  I'll chase storms, so I'll be in your neighborhood Thursday.  Pretty strong, but not awesomely so.   I cycle a lot, which includes 20 miles a day from April to November.  More indoor exercise in the winter.  I could still lose 15 lb.

 

I'm definitely trying the S7.  Reviews and discussion make it seem to be at the opposite end of the noodle-to-plank spectrum from the HT.  Good for isolating characteristics, as you put it.

 

thanx.

post #5 of 12

ON3P Billy Goat in a 186. or the s7

 

Oh demo, well then demo the S7 in a 188 and then buy the BG.

post #6 of 12

Try Praxis Protest or even the Powder Boards. Should be able to find a demo around Tahoe.

 

I love my 185 Powders for slarving and pivoting in the trees. Deeper the better.

post #7 of 12

Full reverse/reverse is best when your willing to sacrafice harder snow performance

 

Full reverse with normal sidecut is the best for mix and for people who like ski crud as well, think Volkl Katana, Icelandtic Gypsy

 

The S7, bents, and JJ all would make great tree skis as well.

post #8 of 12

I wouldn't go as far as to say that the S7 is at the opposite end of the stiffness spectrum to the Huge. They both have very strong dampening, and the S7 is not overly soft under the boots, nor does it flap much in chop. Some of the K2's would fit that description.

post #9 of 12

I like skiing Tahoe trees as well and I'm looking at a new ski.  I like my Mantra 184s in the trees just fine but they are a little beat.

 

I'm looking at the MX 88 and have a demo setup for Friday at Squaw.  I don't really consider Squaw a tree skiing mountain with a few notable exceptions in Squaw Creek.

 

They only had the 178 length so I'm going to have to extrapolate a bit.

 

How would the MX 88s in a 178 handle whatever trees I find and try at Squaw?

 

I'll look at the rest of the list after I demo the Kastles.

 

post #10 of 12

this opens a can of worms here, but I'd say an 88mm ski is not wide enough to completely enjoy tree skiing, which is most fun in deep snow.

post #11 of 12

I'm going to recommend the ON3P Billy Goat. I haven't found a ski that can dominate trees quite like it can, while still tearing up crud and taking big drops. The S7 tail was too weak for drops, and the tip too high/floppy in crud for my likes. The Billy Goat gave me exactly what I was looking for. Seriously... the skis aren't really holding me back, it's mostly my shoulder width... haha

 

Trees (inbounds, several days after a storm - good reason why there aren't any other tracks down these lines, 40-45 degrees and damn tight):

 

 

 

Crud (sorry, not the greatest lighting):

 

 

 

Solid tail for big drops:

 

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Lindahl View Post

I'm going to recommend the ON3P Billy Goat. I haven't found a ski that can dominate trees quite like it can, while still tearing up crud and taking big drops. The S7 tail was too weak for drops, and the tip too high/floppy in crud for my likes. The Billy Goat gave me exactly what I was looking for. Seriously... the skis aren't really holding me back, it's mostly my shoulder width... haha

 

Trees (inbounds, several days after a storm - good reason why there aren't any other tracks down these lines, 40-45 degrees and damn tight):

 

 

 

Crud (sorry, not the greatest lighting):

 

 

 

Solid tail for big drops:

 



All of this.  Billy Goats are by far the most nimble pow ski I've ever been on.  On a PURE pow day, there's nothing I'd reach for before them.  Not only can they swivel turn on a dime, they have by far the fattest edges and some of the most durable bases I've ever seen- this ski will last for years and years and years.  I would pick something else more traditional if I had to deal with groomers on the reg, but for a pure pow ski, there is none higher.  It's shape just allows you to stay forward and bang turns just like you're used to, and the pintail/fat shovel just makes it very compliant in hucks and funky snow, mank and crust.  Try TGR gear swap, there's a ton of them switching hands all the time over there. 

 

     

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