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East Coast glades

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Hey there!

 

I've recently started skiing glades, and would love to get better at them. I'm at the point where I can deal well with the glades that aren't as dense, and would like to work on those before working my way up. Recently had a lot of fun in glades at Steamboat in CO and the Timbuktu trail at Jay Peak, and I was wondering which eastern mountains offer similar glade trails for those of us that aren't quite yet at the level of the dense trees?

 

Also, I'm about to go to Hunter b/c a friend lives nearby and noticed there's one double black glade run there. What exactly makes it a double black, and how does it compare to other glades? (I know there's a fair amount of variation between mountains on what constitutes a black/double black).  Steepness, coverage, denseness of forest, etc?

 

Any experiences you've had are appreciated!

 

post #2 of 23

I was at Okemo yesterday (I don't normally ski there) but they appeared to have some trails that were more open glades as well as some that were pretty tight as well. My only complaint is the ones I was on lacked the steepness I would have liked.

 

I personally like Killington's glades but not sure if you would classify them as "open". I would even go as far as to say as glades can vary even on the same mountain.

 

Good luck thou!!

post #3 of 23

The one glade at Hunter tends to have low coverage but skiable often (I don't know if it is at the moment with the recent charge of warmer weather). It's about the steepness of a black run with average to widely spaced trees, nothing too hard. No cliffs to worry about either. I believe it's single black, not double black according to the conditions report. It should be single and not double anyways, doesn't compare to it's double diamonds there in my opinion.

post #4 of 23

Stratton and Burke have decent glades that are not too tight, keep looking around at Jay there are glades/trees of quite a bit of variety.Lower down on mountains when you are in the hardwoods it is a bit easier to see the lines than when you are higher in elevation and in the pine trees and can't see thru the trees as easily.

post #5 of 23

Flatton's glades are a little flat though.

post #6 of 23

Stowe has tons of glades throughout the mountain. The difficulty of those glades varies widely, from some pretty extreme stuff up on the top of Mansfield, to some mellow stuff lower down. Stowe doesn't mark their glades as trails, though. Many of the glades have "unofficial" names, such as the Butt Crack. Some exploring and local knowledge go a long way. Okemo also has some good glades, both marked and unmarked. Double Diamond is wide open, and hardly counts as a genuine glade. Black Hole and Supernova are a little tighter. Unmarked there's the Stadium/Icefall route, which is probably my favorite glade on Okemo. Also, don't be surprised if during this thread the information you get about unmarked glades are sketchy. Most tree skiers guard their stashes jealously. When I worked at Okemo, we had a super secret, 'enhanced' trailmap which had all the glades marked. There were as many unmarked glades on the mountain as there were marked trails. There were 115 trails when I worked there. But that map was kept locked up and was never seen by anybody we didn't know personally.

post #7 of 23

You might consider a Bromley/Magic trip, starting with Bromley's confidence-inspiring, widely spaced, and easy-to-find glades and then stepping up to Magic on day two. 

 

In the Catskills, Plattekill also has some great tree-skiing, and the mountain bike trails yield wider spacing than most Eastern resorts.  They tend to get signicantly more natural snow than their more popular brethren, but the snowmaking is limited.

post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 

This is all great information! Thanks so much, everyone. I hope that these gladed areas are still on decent inclines!

 

Unfortunately I barely went skiing in January and my next three weekends feature planned trips to none of these places. Very weak. So I'm going to cross my fingers for a super snowy March and see if I can drum up support for a trip to one of the Vermont ski areas mentioned above. Having grown up skiing Killington every year, I had no idea about all these awesome less-traveled mountains at my disposal now that I live in Boston!

 

Now I'm off to go grab a pair of skis...good thing I know my true skiing purpose now and can choose skis accordingly! Soon I'll be bothering locals about their favorite spots with the best of them...

post #9 of 23

Perhaps a bit late to the party....but Mt. Snow has a rope-to-rope open terrain policy.  Lots of glades and trees: north face has some pretty obvious lines (and some tat are much steeper and less obvious) and some on the other side, off of Thanks Walt are obvious also (less steep).  Other lines are fairly intuitive.  The nice thing is that you can decided how steep you want your trees by simply sussing out how steep the nearest trail is.  All you need is good conditions.

post #10 of 23

Sugarbush has some nice glades where you can work your way from some that look like groomers that just happen to have trees spaced out all over the 'trail' , all the way up to 'uh oh' kind of glades where you want to kick your own wahzoo for getting in too deep, LOL

 

I have a ultra respect for Sugarbush, a few seasons ago I was deep in the woods and the mountain ate my ski....

post #11 of 23

Holy thread bump, Batman!

 

Just thought I'd toss Bretton Woods out there as another NE area with a fair number of intermediate glades.

post #12 of 23

I'm biased towards Jay cause I love skiing there- but that is where I learned to ski glades and there is a good variety of ability level amongst the glades there. If you check out Bever Pond, even, that glade run in itself can vary in difficulty

 

skiing the glades at jay made me a better skiier hands down. A bunch of the VT mtns have quality glades

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

Holy thread bump, Batman!

 

Just thought I'd toss Bretton Woods out there as another NE area with a fair number of intermediate glades.



Second that, Matthias.  Bretton Woods has graduated glades from barely-a-glades to beginner glades to intermediate and advanced tree skiing.  All but the expert stuff is on the trail map.

Cannon has intermediate-expert glades.  Many are on the trail map; many more are not.

Ragged has one big open glade with some length to it.

post #14 of 23

I find the best glades are the ones which get the most snow or the ones that stay untouched long enough to enjoy the snow which fell a while ago. If the resort allows it I spend almost all my time in the glades. I am certain there are great glades on every mountain, finding them is part of the fun although it is always nice if a local will help show you the way. Below I list a few of the mountains I have skied regularly, by no means is this list exhaustive, and I cannot wait to explore the trees at Jay, Sugarbush, and Okemo as mentioned above.

 

My Best advice: Throw yourself into the trees even if it does not look like a trail and do not be afraid to fall. I see "lines" everywhere.

 

Vermont

 

MRG - I, and I would think many east coast glade skiers, consider these pines the elite. The slogan "Ski it if you can" holds true on a good portion of the mountain,  "Paradise" Amazing thick, steep glades  is  in fact paradise but only for those ready to Venture. However even the novice and intermediate tree skiers can find and stay in the woods at this legendary mountain. There are plenty of opportunities for the new tree skier to find solace in the gazelle glades and lower glades, and when one is ready, you can find a new state of mind on an early morning run from the top of Single Chair.

 

Killington - has some excellent glades, for the beginning glade skier try the trails from the top of "Ramshead", "Sunrise" has a few short marked glades but also  has some excellent stashes for the wandering skier. be wary of the wider/ marked glades if not hit early in the morning or during a dump they can get icy/slick/ and crusty. Once you venture out on these peaks "Bear" has some  marked glades which will get the adrenaline flowing.

 

New Hampshire - If there is snow...GO!

 

Cannon - Known for their steeps and wind blown icy chutes you wouldn't necessarily expect to find good tree skiing here. But with the opening last year of the Mittersill double, which basically added an entirely new mountain worth of terrain. This area was an old resort it its own right which went out of business (back in the 90's?) and has since been growing. With Snow the terrain is awesome. I skied it  many a day and found myself hitchhiking quite a few times having missed the cutback. With the double now open skiing this area has become a bit easier.

 

Attitash/Bretton/Wildcat - All of these hills with a good snow cover, one can have a good amount of fun in the woods.

 

New York

 

Belleayre - Be willing to hike to get in. be willing to hike to get out. Cathedral Brook all the way to the skiers right has some wide open amazing trees. Go past the AT lean to and just have some fun.

 

Maine -

 

The LOAF (Sugarloaf) -  Plan a weeks trip here. Do as much research as you can ahead of time and explore, explore, explore. The locals are not that helpful but buy them a shot or a brew and they will let you in on some of their favorite stashes. This place is huge. and getting even bigger with their 2020 expansion plan. The entrances to these gems can be hidden and hard to get into. DO NOT let that scare you. Often times the best trees are the ones where you stare at the entrance and go WTF. This mountain is far but cheap and Epic!

 

Canada 

 

Tremblant - I grew up in these trees and I would be amiss if I did not mention them. This is where I fell in love with the meditative powers of the trees.  If you know where to ski, at what time of the day - you win. Hint: Follow the Sun. Great bumpy glades on the Soleil and on the North Side, but the best stashes can be found on the Edge. This is a great place for a family trip or to go up with folks who do not ski as you have the entire village below, while amazing skiing for you above.

 

 

 

 

 

post #15 of 23

This is the glade trail at Killington between Outer Limits and Wildfire.  (Growler, maybe?)

Photos were taken last February.

 

P1020490.JPG

P1020506.JPG

 

As always, not as flat as it looks.

The small trees/underbrush does get a bit thick near the bottom.

post #16 of 23

Stratton has quite a few glades trails that are open enough to ski but lots of fun as well. Most are clustered near the top of the mountain, although the Kidderbrook Ravine is one of my favorites and it heads down towards the Sun Bowl. A (frozen) stream/gully runs down the middle, creating a natural bowl that's fun to play with, plus there is a lot of terrain off to skier's left.

 

The glades between Polar Bear and Grizzly Bear are fun, and are wide enough that you can take multiple runs and keep skiing different lines. You can also duck into the woods off Polar Bear on the other side (skier's right) and make it all the way down to Black Bear (don't exit too early or you'll miss a big chunk; stay skier's right.)

 

If you want to push things a bit, go skier's left off the top of Lower Downeaster, where the trees are tighter at first but then open into what can be a nice stash of snow. It's hard to get out of there, because you exit through thick brush onto a flat snowcat road.

 

Stratton says they widened Test Pilot glades over the summer (skier's right off Kidderbrook), but I haven't skied there yet, for obvious reasons.

 

Lots of other glades at Stratton, but this will get you started. When skiing for fun in a good winter, I spend 70% of my time in the glades at Stratton.

 

 

post #17 of 23

Gore Mtn. New York--lots of long, long glade runs.  There are so many glades on the trail map that it isn't necessary to mention the glades that don't appear on the map.  My favorite is Barkeater Glades, followed by Cave Glades, followed by Chatterbox Glades (which I like because it's a great alternative to skiing a groomer down to the base lodge).  The steepest is probably Mineshaft Glades (short tho).

 

Of course, for all those great glades to open, we need to get some natural snow first.  frown.gif

 

STE

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kase-1 View Post

I have a ultra respect for Sugarbush, a few seasons ago I was deep in the woods and the mountain ate my ski....



Om nom nom nom... Delicious ski, mountain wants more!

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkibumJH View Post

Canada 

 

Tremblant - I grew up in these trees and I would be amiss if I did not mention them. This is where I fell in love with the meditative powers of the trees.  If you know where to ski, at what time of the day - you win. Hint: Follow the Sun. Great bumpy glades on the Soleil and on the North Side, but the best stashes can be found on the Edge. This is a great place for a family trip or to go up with folks who do not ski as you have the entire village below, while amazing skiing for you above.

 

 


 

I understand your reasoning for putting Tremblant's trees in here, but I found the trees here to be cut extremely wide and relatively flat and the lack of snow at Tremblant doesn't help either.

post #20 of 23

Saddleback has loads of great tree skiing. Obviously good natural cover is required. March is the best month, generally.

 

post #21 of 23

Nobody is going to reveal their FAVORITE private stash, so you are probably getting people's B-list recommendations.  Just sayin'rolleyes.gif

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeddyO View Post

Nobody is going to reveal their FAVORITE private stash, so you are probably getting people's B-list recommendations.  Just sayin'rolleyes.gif



I would show anyone in person. The private stashes stay that way because they are hard to get to and hard to find not because people do not know about them.

post #23 of 23

I would suggest Sunday River for intermediate glades. If you want very simple you could do last tango, a little harder would be wizards gulch, and advanced would be Chutzpah, Flying Monkeys, Celestial, Devils Den etc.

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