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ankle and foot pain from boots

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I started skiing for the first time this year and I love the sport! I’m trying to find out why my rented ski boots are so uncomfortable each week.  I’ve tried three different boot sizes and still have severe ankle and foot pain.  This might also explain why my performance declines as the day goes on. I'm sure that part of the problem is that I have a slightly pronated foot and the rented boot is not fitted for me personally and that probably has worn out padding and support.  I asked one of the kids working the rental shop and they said that I could try a “spacer” next week.  Any ideas on what I can do to make the my rental boots more comfortable and thus my skiing experience more enjoyable? 

 

Thanks

post #2 of 6

Welcome to Epic and skiing, glad you're having fun, except for the rental boots.  Rental boots are notorious for not fitting very well.  They are usually wide, fairly cheaply made and the bottom of the brand, although they tend to be fairly durable.  In addition, there are still a lot of rear and mid entry boots in rental fleets and you can't even remove the liners to due a shell fit to be sure you get the correct size.  Since you have problems with pronation I would recommend you consider getting your own boots and getting them from a boot fitter who can address the pronation.  You can still rent skis but you won't have to go through the pain of trying to find a rental boot that fits each time you go skiing.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis there about boot fitting and check the list of boot fitters for the one nearest you.

 

BTW, I have no idea what the shop employee means by a "spacer" but it is unlikely to make the boots feel any better.  Your specific problem is likely to be that your feet are not being supported properly from the bottom up.

post #3 of 6

If at all possible, go to someone on this list of certified bootfitters:  http://www.bootfitters.com/oldsite/FIND_SHOP.htm

 

I'm sure any of them will talk your ear off for free :)  But they can also hook you up with the right boot for your foot.  It's cheaper if you buy a boot that's been sitting on their store shelf for a year or two.  Then again, that may be a big investment if this is something you're just beginning.

 

But, be warned:  some ski hills won't let you use their rental skis with your own boots.  My wife had that problem last season, and solved it by just buying some used skis.  But, that's $400 that we hadn't really planned on spending.  She's waaaay more comfortable now, though!

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the great responses!  With only a few weeks left in the ski season, I'm hoping that I can do something to enhance the rental boots to eliminate the ankle pain.  I typically where a size 8.5 shoe and since they don't have rentals in half sizes, I've tried a size 9,8, and lastly a 7.  The 7 actually seemed better on the ankle but tight on my foot.  Seems like this souldn't be so complicated.  Please keep the advice coming!

post #5 of 6


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanxplorer View Post

Thanks for the great responses!  With only a few weeks left in the ski season, I'm hoping that I can do something to enhance the rental boots to eliminate the ankle pain.  I typically where a size 8.5 shoe and since they don't have rentals in half sizes, I've tried a size 9,8, and lastly a 7.  The 7 actually seemed better on the ankle but tight on my foot. 

 

 Without knowing which brand and model rental boot they're giving you here, about the only thing one might suggest is - try a womens' 8,9?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanxplorer View PostSeems like this souldn't be so complicated.  Please keep the advice coming!

 

There's really not much to say beyond what has already been posted. You might try renting from a ski shop before you go instead of renting on the hill.   

post #6 of 6

It's not unusual, and prolly more commonplace to be sized down when fitting for ski boots, so finding a size 7 to be better would not be weird. If this works best and your toes aren;t bangin hard against the front of the boot, then that's perferrable.

Tight - tight is good as long as you don;t get more hot spots on the feet and the ball of the foot area and toes are not getting crunched - tight is good.

You know, there's no real easy way to help make boots fit better for a beginner, over the internet - especially rental. There's no way to know what condition the boots are in, they even vary from one boot to the next, in the same size based on the amount of use they've seen.

Socks

socks make a big diff.

using socks which are too thick and sqoochy will give the appearance of comfort when trying on, but after a brief time on the hill, will cause discomfort, for lots of reasons.

Try to use as light a pair of socks as possible

Dry Boots

Often rental boots are not quite dry enough from the prior day or use. If the boots you;ve gotten seem damp at all inside, ask for another pair which should be dry. Wet is a no-no...

Don;t tuck anything inside the boot!

Try to wear ski/snowbd/snow pants which have an elastic 'snowcuff' in the lower leg opening. Even the cheapest bibs/pants usually have these snowcuffs...

Try to make sure your feet stay dry.

If you perspire a lot in the boots, bring an extra pr of socks and change mid-day.

 

Many 'local' shops (those off-mtn and in-town - your town or the mtn town) will take a little more time to 'fit' the rental better. If you find a type/size of rental boots you like, you can often 'reserve' that rental boot for your ski day. Having the consistenct of a rental boot which fits well for the entire season would have a HUGE effect on your enjoyment and progress.

When you;re ready to buy equipment - buy boots FIRST.

Shop around, try on a lot, try to find a shop and boot fitter whom you think is working well with you.

Then before you buy, go to the boot/fitter forum here and ask them questions about your possible purchase. Lots of questions. They're good guys and help steer you well.

 

hope your excitment for skiing become a long term addiction! beercheer.gif

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