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Longest sustained in-bound pitches in Utah

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Curious as to what resorts/individual runs have the longest sustained steep pitches, preferably without a cat track/traverse in the middle. Say 35+ degrees.

From my own limited experience, eddies @ alta would be one of them. Eagles nest/north rustler may be longer but there are definitely some flat patches and it ends up getting cut badly by people trying to avoid the rope tow.

 

Dalton's draw to lower silver fox is also pretty steep but it likewise gets cut up by traverses

 

What else out there compares?

post #2 of 22

 A lot of the stuff at Snowbird.

post #3 of 22

I would say the Grizzly DH at Snowbasin would fit the bill.  There are many other long (2400' +) runs off the John Paul chair & Allen Pk. tram that are pretty sustained.

 

JF

post #4 of 22

Hobacks in Jackson Hole - not in Utah, but the yardstick by which to measure.  You already mentioned High Rustler at Alta - that's a beaut!

post #5 of 22

Eddie's High Nowhere

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-BXJ6Iz-N0

post #6 of 22

 Or should we just be saying go to Europe for sustained vert? The Hobacks would be nothing that special in Europe.

post #7 of 22

Snowbird - the entire resort.

 

post #8 of 22

If you want 1000' in a shot I think you can probably get that at any where.

 

I don't think Alta has any big descents where you drop 2000' in one continuous shot. The bigger continuous drops are around 1200' and most are 1000 or less.

 

For 2000'  I would say snowbird and snow basin are where its at.

 

If you want bigger you would probably have to tour for it.

post #9 of 22

Castle Mountain, Alberta Canada, we advertise the longest sustained inbound pitch in Canada for our Lone Star run at 38+ for 2800 verticle.  we have steeper runs, not as long in the chutes but for steepest sustained pitch, that is supposed to be the longest sustained in Canada  at 38+

post #10 of 22



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

Castle Mountain, Alberta Canada, we advertise the longest sustained inbound pitch in Canada for our Lone Star run at 38+ for 2800 verticle.  we have steeper runs, not as long in the chutes but for steepest sustained pitch, that is supposed to be the longest sustained in Canada  at 38+


I was going to use this post as a textbook case of how to use Google Earth to debunk some of these unrealistic claims about steepness and vertical drop.  Castle Mountain even boldly has a link to Google Earth on their website.  But after going there, the above is not that far off! It isn't 38 degrees for 2800 vertical feet, but it's damned impressive, and might have been the best answer to the O.P. if it was in Utah.  From Google Earth I get that the Lone Star run has about 2200 feet of vertical from the very peak down to the catwalk.  Google Earth's "Ruler" tool gives a horizontal distance of 3800 feet.  So the angle is given by the tangent of those two numbers as just over 30 degrees.  I've never heard of another run that steep over such a big drop.  The vertical does go up over 2800 feet on the front side of the mountain, at an angle of 26 degrees, which is also awesome.

 

I'll be right back after doing High Rustler (virtually, I mean).  Some of you folks who've actually skied some of these runs should try the calculation.

 

OK, for High Rustler I get a total vertical of 1200 feet over a horizontal distance of 2070.  That's 30 degrees, same as Lone Star but 1000 feet less vertical. The upper three-quarters is steeper, 900 vertical feet in 1240, that's 36 degrees.  

post #11 of 22


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mapnut View Post



 


I was going to use this post as a textbook case of how to use Google Earth to debunk some of these unrealistic claims about steepness and vertical drop.  Castle Mountain even boldly has a link to Google Earth on their website.  But after going there, the above is not that far off! It isn't 38 degrees for 2800 vertical feet, but it's damned impressive, and might have been the best answer to the O.P. if it was in Utah.  From Google Earth I get that the Lone Star run has about 2200 feet of vertical from the very peak down to the catwalk.  Google Earth's "Ruler" tool gives a horizontal distance of 3800 feet.  So the angle is given by the tangent of those two numbers as just over 30 degrees.  I've never heard of another run that steep over such a big drop.  The vertical does go up over 2800 feet on the front side of the mountain, at an angle of 26 degrees, which is also awesome.

 

I'll be right back after doing High Rustler (virtually, I mean).  Some of you folks who've actually skied some of these runs should try the calculation.

 

OK, for High Rustler I get a total vertical of 1200 feet over a horizontal distance of 2070.  That's 30 degrees, same as Lone Star but 1000 feet less vertical. The upper three-quarters is steeper, 900 vertical feet in 1240, that's 36 degrees.  

 

I have to laugh that stowe has much more sustained pitch than Atla. :)

 

post #12 of 22

Mapnut, why don't you put a step-by-step quick guide on how to locate a slope on google earth and then how you compute vertical and horizontal displacement/distance?

I think that would be pretty constructive for many on this site.

A suggestion (well I'd benefit too)

post #13 of 22

I might as well, since I'm idle at work today.  By the way Bushwhacker, I did the Lone Star trail at Castle Mountain, Alberta, as mentioned by Lady Salina, not the Starr trail at Stowe.  But I'll use Starr as my example.

 

I guess you have to download Google Earth to get all the tools, as opposed to using Google Maps.  Enter Stowe vt as your location (I love watching Google Earth fly you across the country).  Pan northwest to Mt Mansfield and zoom in on the Nose.  Use the pan and tilt tools at the top to get a good look at the steepness.  The elevation at your cursor is shown at the bottom.  There used to be some problems with these elevations especially on mountain peaks, but it's much better now.

 

Click on the ruler tool at the top, and select feet instead of miles. Click at the top of the slope you want to measure, and note the elevation.  Then draw a line to the bottom of the slope and note the elevation there.  The difference is your vertical drop.  The Ruler popup will show a distance which is the horizontal length between your end points, i.e. what it would be on a map.  The angle can be got from the tangent, which is the vertical divided by the horizontal. Here's a trig table in case you don't have a scientific calculator:  http://math2.org/math/trig/tables.htm

 

For the steepest pitch at the top of Starr I get a top elevation of 3290 and a bottom elevation of 2940, for a vertical of 350 feet.  The popup shows a base length of 556 feet.  So the tangent is 0.6295, and the angle is 32.2 degrees.  If you want the whole trail down to the Lookout liftline, use the Path tool instead of Line so you can go around bends.  The vertical is 1096 feet over a length of 2304 for a tangent of 0.476, which is an angle of 25.4 degrees.

 

Stowe-starr.jpg

post #14 of 22

Thanks Manput, after I posted I realized I had put in the full 2800 verticle instead of the 2200 to the catwalk ).  It is advertised as canada's longest consistent inbound pitch and I do believe they say 2200 on the web site.  Sorry for the mis typed the full hill verticle number off the top of my head and was aware it was 2200.  I just posted as general info as people were mentioning Europe and such for consistent steep pitches.  High Rustler is much shorter to ski the Lone Star.  Now, i'm not much for wanting to play with Google Earth, and the resort claims it's 38+.  Are you saying that is is only just over 30 for the 2200 '? Just curious.  Also, it's not the steepest run here, the other chutes are steeper but don't run as long as Lone Star, or feel steeper when skied.  Castle Mountain Ski Resort (which is just the name, it's not on CAstle Mountain) does carry very consistent pitches top to bottom.  I actually can't load Google Earth here, the hills at Castle are great, the internet is intermittant at best, lol.

post #15 of 22

thanks MN, will try it on Google Earth, but the key first is figuring how to peg the start of an incline with reasonable accuracy..thanks 

post #16 of 22

i tried snowbasin and i could'nt figure out the vertical perspective very well! ie where is the slope i am looking for...will try again laterbiggrin.gif

post #17 of 22

Check out my site, it lists tons of eastern ski resorts in the US and their steepest ski slopes. Link in sig

post #18 of 22

Skiking's website is a feast of really detailed information, dude must be a land surveyor ! It's great and the fine detailing of the different pitches etc feels quite accurate having skied some of those runs myself.

 

Another place is this site but no idea of who is behind it but the logic is pretty good

http://mountainvertical.com

post #19 of 22

I think Primrose Path.  If you stay to the left of Chip's Run is it a bit over 1,000 ft of sustained pitch vertical to the gulch.  I think that's the winner at Snowbird and likely Utah.

http://www.snowbird.com/imagelib/trailmaps/trailmap_snowbird.pdf


Edited by SnowbirdDevotee - 2/26/11 at 4:00pm
post #20 of 22

Reviving an old thread. I found a site that supposedly has all the info on Wasatch area resorts and backcountry. You can click on Slope Angle and then check a box for the degree range you want to see. Pretty cool!  I do not know how accurate it is but when I look at what it depicts for most of the places I ski, it seems within reason.  If it is accurate, then as the Bushwacker says, Snowbird has a lot more steeps that Alta.

 

the site is www.slopescience.com

post #21 of 22

I ski a lot in Europe; I thought High Rustler was pretty steep, maybe as steep as the middle part of the Valuga chutes at St. Anton, for example. But the steep scene is pretty different, you can't really compare. Here there aren't many trees, for one thing. Lots of chutes between big rocks, though. I loved the Hobacks, but it didn't seem that steep to me (skied it in deep powder only).

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

I would say the Grizzly DH at Snowbasin would fit the bill.  There are many other long (2400' +) runs off the John Paul chair & Allen Pk. tram that are pretty sustained.

 

JF


Have to agree about the Grizzly DH, especially the Men's start off the top of the tram. 
 

 

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