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The difference in technique between skiing powder on R/R and regular skis

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hello, guys! I have heard a few times about some sort of learning curve when people speak about their experiences on R/R skis, like you need a different technique to skis powder on them. Could someone please specify what exactly shall be done differently on the skis like the Praxis Powder and Lotus 138 when compared to traditional powder skis like K2 Seths or Kastle 108? Thanks a lot in advance.

post #2 of 11

Im just guessing bud I do believe it just staying centered on the ski and a little more upright if im not mistaken.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Staying centered on the skis is I believe the way to ski powder on a tradtional ski, isn't it?

As far as staying upright goes, do you mean less bend in the knees or in the waist?

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post

Hello, guys! I have heard a few times about some sort of learning curve when people speak about their experiences on R/R skis, like you need a different technique to skis powder on them. Could someone please specify what exactly shall be done differently on the skis like the Praxis Powder and Lotus 138 when compared to traditional powder skis like K2 Seths or Kastle 108? Thanks a lot in advance.


on the R/R boards youll be able to edge more, turn your feet more, and be able to vary tip and tail pressure more. You turns will be more dynamic on R/R if you want them to be and they could also bemore slarvy if you want them to be. Basically they have larger useable range of speeds, slip angles and edge angles.

 

 

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you, Josh! Just one more question to make it clear - does my technique change or does it remain pretty much the same but with more tolerance to weight shift and angles?

post #6 of 11

Google for "McConkey Brain Floss" to poke around and find a still working link to the "instructions" for the Spatula (one such copy should actually be here ). To offer up a clue: 

 

Quote:
First of all, in order to clear your mind and attempt to make sense of all this, take most everything you have ever learned about skiing and stick it where the sun don’t shine. Or at least in the garage next to your shaped skis.

 

 

The short answer is yes, your technique changes if you want to optimize your use of the design. I'd expect the gulf between an R/R and even the bigger Kastles to be pretty big. With a Seth it'd depend on the year. FWIW, the gulf with a "seth" will depend on the year. This year's is quite rockered and is reasonably slarvable - but not an R/R. No it is not a whole new sport. Anyway, read the wisdom of McConkey...

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks, that's informative!

post #8 of 11

In soft snow it takes about 10 turns to make the adjustment to the Praxis Protest (one example hybrid, full rocker, rev sidecut) Don't overthink it, think fun and easy. 

 

post #9 of 11

So, to distil it down to a sweeping generalised comment, more of the skills you develop on groomed snow, such as edging pressures, foot rotation/steering and slarving, can be more easily brought into play with R/R boards.  Is that a fair assessment?

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

In soft snow it takes about 10 turns to make the adjustment to the Praxis Protest (one example hybrid, full rocker, rev sidecut) Don't overthink it, think fun and easy. 

 


I like that thought. I find if I try to hard to {drive} my RR skis they tell me they are unhappy with me and are going to make life difficult. When i think happy thoughts and just bang,slarve loosey goose the snow they say bring it on and will out performe any traditional ski in deeper snow by a large margin with relitive ease. When you have decent powder 6inches to 3ft of the light stuff you can ski these {if you get the right width} the same as you would a mid fat on a groomer. Heavy deep crudded up powder 2-3 hours after the ski hill is open on a busy day you just crank the dins and hang on. The tips wont dive but in the air the ride is much smoother just touching down once and a while.
 

post #11 of 11

IMO, the skills developed on groomed snow (beyond learning to ski basic technique correctly)  are mostly a set of bad habits for powder skiing, most don't carry over, unless you are doing specific powder drills on groomers. Groomers make one lazy and weak, physically and mentallyjk.gif, so bad prep for deep snow. Just as irrelevant and counter-productive, as you found whipper, is to drive them like full race GS skis. They are casual, man, cool. cool.gif

 

That said, and assuming your RR ski is minimum 115 to 140mm waist,  you have a lot of ski to work with in the waist . It feels like most of the turning is happening very close, fore and aft, to your feet, both feet; and that, FWIW, is my sweeping (slarving) generalization pertaining to RR rocker technique in deep snow and crud.

 

As simple as they are to ski, not so simple for three people to say anything similar about them relating to technique. LMAO

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