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When someone asks, "how good are you?" - Page 4

post #91 of 119

I can't ever remember being asked that except by a non-skier.  To which I'd reply, "I'm okay."  Normally my criteria for a ski partner is nothing to do with their technique, but only if we ski about the same speed and do I trust them to worry about me in difficult terrain.  After two tree well deaths this year, I'm not looking for someone who skis to the lift and waits (or worst of all, gets on the lift and waits at the top!!).  I want someone who knows I'm not in a tree well because they keep in eye contact or at least yelling distance.  I do that for others and if they won't do it for me, there's no point in skiing "with" them.  I can talk to ANYONE on a chair....  Skiing down the same run at a vastly different pace is not "skiing with" someone.  Enjoy, comment on, savor, change runs midway because of a sudden whim...THAT'S skiing together. 

post #92 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

I show them my card and say this good:

 

apres-ski-cartoon.jpg

 

Here's mine.  I only need one to keep up with Old Boot..

 

1000x500px-LL-b6c0382a_IMG_2714.JPG



Im good enough that I only run over one friend a year!!!

 

post #93 of 119

I'm modest about my abilities because my abilities are modest.........

post #94 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by gpetrics View Post

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=type+3+skier

 

Type III "Aggressive skiing at HIGHER visual indicator settings."

  • Prefer fast speeds.
  • Prefer steep terrain.
  • Receive higher than average visual indicator settings.


First, dragging a silly DIN chart into this discussion is like dragging a skier class level chart in; they exist for specific purposes. In the case of the DIN chart, it's for setting bindings. No more.

 

Taking the leap from "I set my DIN above the chart" to "I believe most skiers whose DIN goes to 11 to be about the same" is like saying "I believe people who sign up for a level 9 class to be about the same."


Did I drag a din chart in?

 

In case I wasn't clear, my point is that I think anyone who can honestly classify themselves as Type III skier (prefers high speeds and steep terrain) is about the same level as anyone else (when talking about all mountain non competitive skiing--obviously there's differences in racing, and freestyle, but there are set standards there for determining who is best so I figure that's not what we're talking about).

 

everything above those two key characteristics is just balls, ego, hutzpah, etc.... nothing to do with actual skiing ability

post #95 of 119

TYPE I SKIERS
TYPE II SKIERS
TYPE III SKIERS
Cautious skiing at lighter release/retention settings
Moderate skiing at average release/retention settings
Aggressive skiing at higher release/retention settings
  • Ski conservatively
  • Prefer slower speeds
  • Favor lower than average retention/release settings - this corresponds to an increased risk of inadvertent binding release in order to gain increased releasability in a fall
  • TYPE I settings apply to entry level skiers uncertain of their classification
  • Ski moderately
  • Prefer a variety of speeds
  • Ski on varied terrain including most difficult trails
  • TYPE II skiers are those who do not meet all the descriptions of either Type II or III
  • Ski Aggressively
  • Normally ski at high speeds
  • Prefer steeper and more challenging terrain
  • This corresponds to decreased releaseability in a fall in order to gain a decreased risk of inadvertent binding release

 

 

I think a key thing here is for Type III:  "This corresponds to decreased releaseability in a fall in order to gain a decreased risk of inadvertent binding release."  Not all of us want that.  Until I have a pre-release, which has NEVER happened, I am not going to up my bindings because of some ego thing.  I'm more likely to need the ability to get my skis off fast in a tree well.  So, DIN setting selections (which these are for - they are not relative to the question "How good are you?") are a different set of decision issues than we are talking about.  If you race, they make sense.  If you habitually do "no fall zones", maybe.  But if you ski "varied terrain including most difficult trails", maybe you don't choose to set your bindings higher.  This is a personal decision relative to your equipment, not unlike edge bevel.  The fact is, the SKI AREA YOU ARE AT may have more to do with the decision than your ability. 

post #96 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I think a key thing here is for Type III:  "This corresponds to decreased releaseability in a fall in order to gain a decreased risk of inadvertent binding release."  Not all of us want that.

+1

 

A higher DIN settings means that your skis will not release if you fall at a slow or moderate speed. If you're racing and always going balls to the wall, this isn't a problem.  But if you ski at slow or moderate speeds some of the time then it might. 

 

Anyway, high DIN settings are not a proxy for "ability level" nor should they be.  Sometimes it's the opposite - if you have sloppy technique (i.e. twisting your skis ) you'll be popping out of your bindings and have to crank them up to stay in. 

post #97 of 119

I agree with both of you, Walt and sibhusky... I ski a very wide variety of terrain including the steepest in-bounds terrain at our Colorado areas at (un?)reasonably high speeds, but I consistently choose Type II for my binding settings. I rarely will "prerelease" like I did last week, but my preference is to give up a little retention for increased release... and work on skiing more smoothly to compensate. My "prerelease" last week was one of those times when I did something very abruptly... so that seems to align with my expectations...

post #98 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

 

 

I think a key thing here is for Type III:  "This corresponds to decreased releaseability in a fall in order to gain a decreased risk of inadvertent binding release."  Not all of us want that.  Until I have a pre-release, which has NEVER happened, I am not going to up my bindings because of some ego thing.  I'm more likely to need the ability to get my skis off fast in a tree well.  So, DIN setting selections (which these are for - they are not relative to the question "How good are you?") are a different set of decision issues than we are talking about.  If you race, they make sense.  If you habitually do "no fall zones", maybe.  But if you ski "varied terrain including most difficult trails", maybe you don't choose to set your bindings higher.  This is a personal decision relative to your equipment, not unlike edge bevel.  The fact is, the SKI AREA YOU ARE AT may have more to do with the decision than your ability. 

I agree a high DIN setting is not necessarily a good thing. I just had to increase mine after several pre-releases skiing moguls and then having my skis fly off immediately upon landing off the golden eagle jump on birds of prey  
 

post #99 of 119

When I'd be out on training rides with other cyclists, and some other cyclist or motorist would ask, "how far are you guys going?", the correct answer was invariably "All the way!"

 

So, if someone asks, "How good are you?" I guess you could always say, "I'm that good."  Or if you're feeling Socratic, you could counter with, "How good do you need me to be?"

 

smile.gif

post #100 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post

I agree with both of you, Walt and sibhusky... I ski a very wide variety of terrain including the steepest in-bounds terrain at our Colorado areas at (un?)reasonably high speeds, but I consistently choose Type II for my binding settings. I rarely will "prerelease" like I did last week, but my preference is to give up a little retention for increased release... and work on skiing more smoothly to compensate. My "prerelease" last week was one of those times when I did something very abruptly... so that seems to align with my expectations...



your not that dynamic then, doesnt mean your bad far from it but your simply not pushing it................. doubling/tripling up bumps, SG turns at 50 mph, jumping off cliffs into pretty much no fall situations, skiing over rocks and GS turning crud/bump fields are part of my freeskiing. I try to run the lowest I can with out prereleasing. Also keep in mind I can easily twist my foot out of a DIN of 10-11 on most binding while standing still. 

post #101 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
Also keep in mind I can easily twist my foot out of a DIN of 10-11 on most binding while standing still. 


That is how I fine tune my bindings too.  If I can twist out both ways fairly easily that tells me that they are set where they work best for my needs and expectations.  That magic number has decreased as my leg strength wanes and my ligaments become less forgiving.  I also make sure I can pull up out of the heels without hyper extending my knees.  These are the "torque tests" that matter to me.  The din that works for that used to be about 1.5-2 notches above recommended settings, now it is pretty much right on them.

post #102 of 119

I try to be accurate.  I'm not an expert.  I'm better than intermediate.  I guess that's "advanced".  I can ski in-bounds stuff, and if it's groomed, it's usually at whatever speed I choose, and reasonably pretty.  I suck in the bumps.  I'm OK in powder, and improving (just need some more bluebird powder days to practice .... smile.gif)  Trees, crud, ice, and other less-than-optimal conditions, I've gotten better since I've gotten better-suited equipment.

 

I try to get better each year.

 

And I have learned that just being on the mountain is its own reward!

post #103 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post



Somehow, modesty does not seem to be your strong suit.
 


Perhaps you're right, but skiing is a hot dog show-off sport.  Remember the 80's when old people with bad safety and humility oriented attitudes couldn't ski because their muscles had deteriorated to the point of not being able to turn proper skis?  I do.  I'm still there.  Skiing to me is about being a hotshot.   Making outrageous claims is how you set people up to think you're all talk, and then watch the smugness drain from their faces when they see you ski.  Modesty has no place in expert skiing, neither do comfort, ease, or any other soft states of mind or being.  If you can't handle hotshots with attitudes, stay on the bunny hill, or better yet, in the lodge with all the knitting needle crowd.

post #104 of 119

Please don't come here.  We have enough tourons with bad attitudes as it is.  Select destinations popular with other urban types. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post




Perhaps you're right, but skiing is a hot dog show-off sport.  Remember the 80's when old people with bad safety and humility oriented attitudes couldn't ski because their muscles had deteriorated to the point of not being able to turn proper skis?  I do.  I'm still there.  Skiing to me is about being a hotshot.   Making outrageous claims is how you set people up to think you're all talk, and then watch the smugness drain from their faces when they see you ski.  Modesty has no place in expert skiing, neither do comfort, ease, or any other soft states of mind or being.  If you can't handle hotshots with attitudes, stay on the bunny hill, or better yet, in the lodge with all the knitting needle crowd.

post #105 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post




Perhaps you're right, but skiing is a hot dog show-off sport.  Remember the 80's when old people with bad safety and humility oriented attitudes couldn't ski because their muscles had deteriorated to the point of not being able to turn proper skis?  I do.  I'm still there.  Skiing to me is about being a hotshot.   Making outrageous claims is how you set people up to think you're all talk, and then watch the smugness drain from their faces when they see you ski.  Modesty has no place in expert skiing, neither do comfort, ease, or any other soft states of mind or being.  If you can't handle hotshots with attitudes, stay on the bunny hill, or better yet, in the lodge with all the knitting needle crowd.

 

How old are you?  Seriously... 
 

post #106 of 119

Umm....I thought skiing was about having fun, the adrenaline rush, and defying the force of gravity by getting down steep mountains with power, grace and style without taking yourself out ...?  Oh no, wait, it's just about showing off.  Right.  I personally enjoy myself more when I'm not worrying about what others think of me or my skiing, but hey, to each his own. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post




Perhaps you're right, but skiing is a hot dog show-off sport.  Remember the 80's when old people with bad safety and humility oriented attitudes couldn't ski because their muscles had deteriorated to the point of not being able to turn proper skis?  I do.  I'm still there.  Skiing to me is about being a hotshot.   Making outrageous claims is how you set people up to think you're all talk, and then watch the smugness drain from their faces when they see you ski.  Modesty has no place in expert skiing, neither do comfort, ease, or any other soft states of mind or being.  If you can't handle hotshots with attitudes, stay on the bunny hill, or better yet, in the lodge with all the knitting needle crowd.

post #107 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrownEyedGirl View Post

Umm....I thought skiing was about having fun, the adrenaline rush, and defying the force of gravity by getting down steep mountains with power, grace and style without taking yourself out ...?  Oh no, wait, it's just about showing off.  Right.  I personally enjoy myself more when I'm not worrying about what others think of me or my skiing, but hey, to each his own. 

 


 


it is!

but

.

never deny gravity always embrace it with open arms.

post #108 of 119

Surely its just frame of reference.  If the asker is someone who does maybe 1 week's skiing a year an "expert" to them might be xomeone who can ski red (in Euroland) or black groomers in reasonable style.  Anyone who does more skiing might reguarly see people skiing big, burly, technical lines and know that they aren't in the same league and if you're ever lucky enough to ski with a pro athlete then that'll pop egos pretty fast.

post #109 of 119

site lag

post #110 of 119

Site lag

post #111 of 119

We got it the first time

We got it the first time

We got it the first timeROTF.gif

post #112 of 119

I either say I'm a Level 5 Dungeonmaster or a total gaper.

post #113 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

We got it the first time

We got it the first time

We got it the first timeROTF.gif



 Paralyzing site lag this sid eof the pond sorry - mods feel free to remove

post #114 of 119

Site lag

post #115 of 119

When someone asks how good I am I respond "Oh, I don't keep score".  When they ask how I measure myself against other skiers, I reply "by height". 

post #116 of 119

"non sono nessuno"

 

I'm nobode

post #117 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post

"non sono nessuno"

 

I'm nobode



I like that one!

 

This is a healthy thread -- the internet can sometimes have a value inversion, where people spraying about how great they are is encouraged, with the disconnect that in the real world it falls flat.  Inevitably. 

 

"Ok" is good, or for me for some related off-snow activities I'll say I'm an impersonator of someone who does the sport.  E.g. I try to impersonate being a shortboarder. 

post #118 of 119

I agree.  The terrain is not the most determining factor of good skiing. Proper technique is the foundation for good skiing. I try to maintain an intentional awareness of my need for skill development and refinement when skiing.  This helps me improve, and ultimately have more fun.

post #119 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterMagician View Post




Perhaps you're right, but skiing is a hot dog show-off sport.  Remember the 80's when old people with bad safety and humility oriented attitudes couldn't ski because their muscles had deteriorated to the point of not being able to turn proper skis?  I do.  I'm still there.  Skiing to me is about being a hotshot.   Making outrageous claims is how you set people up to think you're all talk, and then watch the smugness drain from their faces when they see you ski.  Modesty has no place in expert skiing, neither do comfort, ease, or any other soft states of mind or being.  If you can't handle hotshots with attitudes, stay on the bunny hill, or better yet, in the lodge with all the knitting needle crowd.


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