or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › When someone asks, "how good are you?"
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

When someone asks, "how good are you?"

post #1 of 119
Thread Starter 

Do you personally feel that you accurately portray your skills, overstate them, or understate them?  What has been your experience with most other skiers?

post #2 of 119

I reply "Why does it matter?".

post #3 of 119

I tell them I am the best skier on the mountain, of coursewink.gif

post #4 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

I reply "Why does it matter?".



Well it might matter if you are interested in skiing together on the same trails at a similar pace.

post #5 of 119

in more areas than that, i'm prone to understatement personally.

post #6 of 119

I always liked Tsavo's response: "Well, I can get off a chairlift unassisted..."

 

Then you have me: I proved in front of a group while in uniform last year that I cannot get onto a platter lift unassisted... but that's to be expected... 

 

rolleyes.gif

post #7 of 119

Honest if it's someone I'm going to ski with, understated or silent otherwise, depending on how arrogant the asker appears.

post #8 of 119

As an instructor, I can tell you that 99% of skiers and snowboarders totally overstate their abilities.  A lot of times, it's due to a misunderstanding of what expert skiing is.  Parents describing their kids are the worst.  Many parents claim that their kids are expert skiers, and I ski with them only to find out that they like to power wedge down black diamond runs.  Too many people use terrain as the criteria instead of technique.

post #9 of 119
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sundown View Post

As an instructor, I can tell you that 99% of skiers and snowboarders totally overstate their abilities.  A lot of times, it's due to a misunderstanding of what expert skiing is.  Parents describing their kids are the worst.  Many parents claim that their kids are expert skiers, and I ski with them only to find out that they like to power wedge down black diamond runs.  Too many people use terrain as the criteria instead of technique.


 

The first sentence helps confirm my suspicion that most skiers overstate their abilities.  The last sentence I think is particularly on point.  I've ran into, "I'm real good...I'll ski anything".  Which basically means "I will get down most inbounds runs...but don't expect it to be fast or look pretty". 

 

That would be like me saying I'll have no problem holing out 17 at TPC Sawgrass.  Now I might put the ball in the cup, but it'd likely take me 2-3 drops and a three putt.

post #10 of 119

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by champagneforbreakfast View Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sundown View Post

As an instructor, I can tell you that 99% of skiers and snowboarders totally overstate their abilities.  A lot of times, it's due to a misunderstanding of what expert skiing is.  Parents describing their kids are the worst.  Many parents claim that their kids are expert skiers, and I ski with them only to find out that they like to power wedge down black diamond runs.  Too many people use terrain as the criteria instead of technique.

 

The first sentence helps confirm my suspicion that most skiers overstate their abilities.  The last sentence I think is particularly on point.  I've ran into, "I'm real good...I'll ski anything".  Which basically means "I will get down most inbounds runs...but don't expect it to be fast or look pretty". 

 

That would be like me saying I'll have no problem holing out 17 at TPC Sawgrass.  Now I might put the ball in the cup, but it'd likely take me 2-3 drops and a three putt.


In my experience, more experienced and older skiers who ski a lot tend to underestimate their skills. Keep in mind that my groups are usually made up of frequent skiers (30-100+ days/season) aged 50 and over.

post #11 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by champagneforbreakfast View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

I reply "Why does it matter?".



Well it might matter if you are interested in skiing together on the same trails at a similar pace.



Hence my question. If they are just curious or asking in regards to the gear I'm using, I try to be as descriptive and honest as possible. If they are interested in skiing with me, I understate.

post #12 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundown View Post

As an instructor, I can tell you that 99% of skiers and snowboarders totally overstate their abilities.  A lot of times, it's due to a misunderstanding of what expert skiing is.  Parents describing their kids are the worst.  Many parents claim that their kids are expert skiers, and I ski with them only to find out that they like to power wedge down black diamond runs.  Too many people use terrain as the criteria instead of technique.


+1  Unless I know the kid, I never take the parents' word for it, I take them up the Magic Carpet first and the beginner chair second.

post #13 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by champagneforbreakfast View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

I reply "Why does it matter?".



Well it might matter if you are interested in skiing together on the same trails at a similar pace.



Hence my question. If they are just curious or asking in regards to the gear I'm using, I try to be as descriptive and honest as possible. If they are interested in skiing with me, I understate.



Ahh, you sly S-O-B.  The "eh, I'm ok" guy.  Then you get out there and slay it.  I read ya, I read ya.

post #14 of 119

I used to overstate my ability.  But now that I am an instructor, I am becoming more aware of my ability.  If anything, I understate now, and simply let my skiing do the talking :).

post #15 of 119

I tell them I've only been at this sport for seven seasons. Then we ski and I let them tell me how good I am.

post #16 of 119

I try to be accurate.  I feel like I can ski with most folks without boring them or me being bored.  If I get a vibe that someone is particularly good, I'd definitely scale it back.

 

It's funny, I've heard that men tend to overstate their abilities while most women understate them.

 

post #17 of 119
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by champagneforbreakfast View Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sundown View Post

As an instructor, I can tell you that 99% of skiers and snowboarders totally overstate their abilities.  A lot of times, it's due to a misunderstanding of what expert skiing is.  Parents describing their kids are the worst.  Many parents claim that their kids are expert skiers, and I ski with them only to find out that they like to power wedge down black diamond runs.  Too many people use terrain as the criteria instead of technique.

 

The first sentence helps confirm my suspicion that most skiers overstate their abilities.  The last sentence I think is particularly on point.  I've ran into, "I'm real good...I'll ski anything".  Which basically means "I will get down most inbounds runs...but don't expect it to be fast or look pretty". 

 

That would be like me saying I'll have no problem holing out 17 at TPC Sawgrass.  Now I might put the ball in the cup, but it'd likely take me 2-3 drops and a three putt.


In my experience, more experienced and older skiers who ski a lot tend to underestimate their skills. Keep in mind that my groups are usually made up of frequent skiers (30-100+ days/season) aged 50 and over.


Yeah, I think responses can vary based on demographics, good point.  You can usually get closer to the truth when you discuss days on the hill and gear, but even that isn't fool proof. 

 

Last year I went skiing with my boss.  He says he used to ski a lot, but now only gets up 3-4 times a year.  Says he's ok.  He shows up with what must have been 205's, no more than 70 underfoot.  Old Volants.  Had an old school, bulky Columbia jacket on, the ones from the 90's.  I'm thinking, "oh great, this is going to be tons of fun".  The dude proceeded to absolutely kick the mountain's ass like no other.  I was eating his cold dust all day long.

post #18 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundown View Post

As an instructor, I can tell you that 99% of skiers and snowboarders totally overstate their abilities.  A lot of times, it's due to a misunderstanding of what expert skiing is.


No surprise there.

 

There's no reason why skiing should be any more immune to the Dunning-Kruger effect than any other activity.

post #19 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by champagneforbreakfast View Post


 "I will get down most inbounds runs...but don't expect it to be fast or look pretty". 



Um....do you mind if I steal that and use it as my standard response? (c:

post #20 of 119

I can't recall anyone asking me how good I am in a really really long time...if ever.

post #21 of 119

I try to be accurate but people have different conceptions and my okay is someones good a lot of times. I have started considered overstating my abilities because everyone at the Air Force Academy has egos and thinks they are great skiers. I have gotten a couple people in over their heads because i took what they said at face value ...

post #22 of 119

I'm an Expert on a beginner run and a beginner on an Expert run...........

post #23 of 119

These days I tell them, "I'm pretty good at carving, but I suck at bumps."

Over the years, the description has changed, but I've always tried to be accurate.

It used to be, "I can ski just about anything, but it ain't pretty".

Then for a while it was, "I'm pretty good at GS/SG turns, but my SL turns need a lot of work."

Then for a while it was, "I can ski frontwards and backwards pretty well, but my sideways skiing needs work."

post #24 of 119

I just say I can side slip down almost anything!

post #25 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by champagneforbreakfast View Post

Do you personally feel that you accurately portray your skills, overstate them, or understate them?  What has been your experience with most other skiers?



"Not quite as good as I used to be" is a standard response.  If someone wants anything specific it depends on whether they sound like a gaper wannabe tossing BSmeter.gif or whether they sound like an actual experienced skier.  For the former I respond something like Chaos would for the latter I just say I tend to shy away from "fall and you die" terrain these days, but I'm up for just about anything else....... if you don't mind waiting for me to catch my breath about every 3 or 4 minutesredface.gif

post #26 of 119

I say, "I have fun."

post #27 of 119

not in jacket

 

"I am the best skier on this mountain"

 

G.N.A.R. points

 

in jacket

 

"I can ski anywhere you see, and really like the trees"

 

post #28 of 119

I understate. I do it for two reasons 1) understated excellence is way cooler than overstated asshattery and 2) you never know who you are talking to. About 10 years ago my sister and I were riding a lift at an I-70 resort. My sister turns to me and says, "you're the best skier on the mountain. I've been looking for someone better all day and finally gave up". Cool props no? Well, fast forward about 7 years and we're lapping the North Face Lift and my sister turns to me and says, "this place is so hardcore and so many skiers here go way bigger than you". Or something to that effect. Gut punch but she was right. It is all relative. Then again, we had just passed a bunch of MSP guys ripping it up.

post #29 of 119

"I do all right"

post #30 of 119

"I can turn both ways", is the stock answer. 

 

Those that can tend to understate; and those that think they can tend to overstate. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › When someone asks, "how good are you?"