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How to get skis flat on a mogul?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I took a lesson a couple of weeks ago and the instructor said to get on top of a mogul with a proper pole plant and get the skis flat. I am a little fuzzy about how to get the skis flat.Can someone describe for me the movement of how you actually get the skis flat? Thanks so much in advance.

post #2 of 10

He was telling you to be in the middle of your transition at the exact moment you are on top of the mogul. Then its easy to pivot your skis because both the tip and the tail would be in the air. Here:

 

2004bump4.jpg

post #3 of 10

Flat means get the skis off their edges.

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyR View Post

I took a lesson a couple of weeks ago and the instructor said to get on top of a mogul with a proper pole plant and get the skis flat. I am a little fuzzy about how to get the skis flat.Can someone describe for me the movement of how you actually get the skis flat? Thanks so much in advance.



this sounds alot like something I would say.....

 

but yeah when you transitions your skis will be flat, you also while learning moguls should keep your skis flatter during the turn.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 



Quote:

Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Flat means get the skis off their edges.

Sorry to be so thick, but what is the correct technique to get off the edges? Thanks in advance.

 

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyR View Post



Quote:

Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Flat means get the skis off their edges.

Sorry to be so thick, but what is the correct technique to get off the edges? Thanks in advance.

 


There is no specific technique to get off the edges. Its something you do every time you turn. You go from one turn to the next. Exact in the middle your skis are flat. You get off your edges only to get on them again.

 

The original instructor advice does not refer to any kind of turning technique. It refers to a timing and line selection.

post #7 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyR View Post

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Flat means get the skis off their edges.

Sorry to be so thick, but what is the correct technique to get off the edges? Thanks in advance.


Tip them so that they flatten against the snow. In bumps, it's more difficult to describe in words than it is on a smooth trail, since the bumps mean that the "slope" isn't consistent.

 

The key is, though, to just flatten the skis against the snow by tipping your feet downhill until they are flat.

post #8 of 10

It might help to think about your knees and the balls of your feet.  When your skis are flat coming to the top of a bump, you'll have equal pressure on the balls of both feet, and both knees will be driven forward equally into the fronts of your boots.  If your body is neutral at this point you can easily pivot either direction.  If you are on edge, you'll already be locked into a direction.  Normally, you would already know which way you are heading (i.e. with the bump line), but you could change course if your skis are flat.

 

I'm not sure what kind of technique your instructor was advocating, but mogul skiing often uses equal weighting of both skis, like in powder skiing (at least old style powder skiing on narrow skis), and pivot turns.  But it won't help much to have a flat ski if you are not fully upright.  Getting forward is the major challenge for most beginning bump skiers.  If you are serious about learning and can take the hits, wait for a day with 'hero' bumps with plenty of new soft snow, then force yourself to commit forward toward the bottom of a run.  You'll pick up speed quickly, and then fall when you miss a turn, probably only after a few turns.  If you fall backward, you aren't committed.  It isn't easy to learn this 'fall line' method, but it is glorious as you start to get the hang of it.  You get into a zone where you are reacting/turning faster then you can consciously think.  Your daily conscious mind locks into the task, and some bigger part of your mind becomes free. It is the closest thing to nirvana I may ever know.  Kind of like the first Matrix movie.

 

Go easy though, pick your conditions and your run outs.  I have plenty of friends with bad knees from daily slamming.  My lower back took a beating.

 

That was more than you asked for.  Good luck.

post #9 of 10


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridahoan View Post

It might help to think about your knees and the balls of your feet.  When your skis are flat coming to the top of a bump, you'll have equal pressure on the balls of both feet, and both knees will be driven forward equally into the fronts of your boots.  If your body is neutral at this point you can easily pivot either direction.  If you are on edge, you'll already be locked into a direction.  Normally, you would already know which way you are heading (i.e. with the bump line), but you could change course if your skis are flat.

 

I'm not sure what kind of technique your instructor was advocating, but mogul skiing often uses equal weighting of both skis, like in powder skiing (at least old style powder skiing on narrow skis), and pivot turns.  But it won't help much to have a flat ski if you are not fully upright.  Getting forward is the major challenge for most beginning bump skiers.  If you are serious about learning and can take the hits, wait for a day with 'hero' bumps with plenty of new soft snow, then force yourself to commit forward toward the bottom of a run.  You'll pick up speed quickly, and then fall when you miss a turn, probably only after a few turns.  If you fall backward, you aren't committed.  It isn't easy to learn this 'fall line' method, but it is glorious as you start to get the hang of it.  You get into a zone where you are reacting/turning faster then you can consciously think.  Your daily conscious mind locks into the task, and some bigger part of your mind becomes free. It is the closest thing to nirvana I may ever know.  Kind of like the first Matrix movie.

 

Go easy though, pick your conditions and your run outs.  I have plenty of friends with bad knees from daily slamming.  My lower back took a beating.

 

That was more than you asked for.  Good luck.


being balanced in bumps is more than just being forward. You have to be aft at some point in time in bumps so you can be forward at other points in time. Learning to balance along the whole ski at various parts of the turn will make you balanced all the time. You are always moving your COM down the hill but it is not a constant rate and when going up bumps you will slow down COM movement down the hill and when on the backside you will speed up COM down the hill.

 

pivot turns are great but you can ski a very round line if your a good enough skier, also your joints/back should never be sore, really if this is the case you are doing soemthing pretty wrong.

post #10 of 10

Yes you can't always be forward, but nine times out of ten not being forward is what holds intermediate skiers back in any challenging condition, and even more so in the bumps.  I assume the OP is an intermediate skier because he is asking about a flat ski.
 

pivot turns are great but you can ski a very round line if your a good enough skier, also your joints/back should never be sore, really if this is the case you are doing soemthing pretty wrong.

 

I guess that's true for what goes for bumps these days.  I don't often see the glorious pyramid bumps like we used to have in the 70's to early 90's -- but those were skied fast and what people are calling fall line technique only.  People who tried to ski them with round turns (eg racers) hated them and flailed.  Couldn't be done consistently.  Those were nothing like the artificial competition bumps or the bumps you see made by intermediate skiers at most resorts now.  They were much closer together, but still tall, so with much steeper sides.

 

Considering that the OP's instructor took him into the bumps, you must be right that these were probably intermediate bumps.  I'd say for most recreational bumps a variety of turning styles is best, and I agree with you that round carved turns are useful, though it's one area where they are not always called for.  What is still true in the bumps is that the faster you go, the more fun it is.

 

Wouldn't you say it's the rare bump skier who has gone for more than a decade that doesn't have some joint problems -- usually knee or back?  How many serious bump skiers over thirty (meaning they've skied bumps religiously for a decade) do you know that don't?  Does that by definition mean they were doing something 'pretty wrong'?  Well, in the same way that all athletes who suffer injuries from their sports, were, in retrospect, doing something wrong.  I would agree that perfection would not lead to injury.  But injury from repetitive stress is often accepted as the price to pay, for better or worse.  Ever get to know a thirty year old ballerina?

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