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Do you drink too much water while skiing?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

So the last few trips I drank too little water and end up getting cramps.  This trip no cramps but when I left the resort I had to use the restroom 4 times in 3 1/2 hours.  Very annoying when your trying to get home quick.  Any tips on how to hold the water so it doesn't just goes through you system.  And even with all the water I had (about 60oz during 5 hours of skiing) I still felt slightly dehydrated.  

post #2 of 24

You might try switching to sports drinks (Gatorade, etc.) or slightly diluted versions instead of pure water.  They contain some of the other minerals you lose when you sweat (like sodium) so they can keep you more balanced than trying to just load up on water.  I think I have to use the bathroom less when drinking them rather than pure water, which I attribute to keeping my sodium levels in line.  Also, I like the taste better when they get slushy.

post #3 of 24

Cramps are rarely associated with hydration levels.  More likely fitness levels.  http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/legpainandinjuries/a/muscle_spasms.htm

post #4 of 24

Yes, straight water goes thru the pipes pretty quickly.

 I don't care for gatorade personally, but if you do, trying diluting at least by half.

 

I use vitamin water. Half and half or perhaps slightly more water added.

Some sugar and electrolytes will help your body hold onto the fluid longer.

 

L.

post #5 of 24

Cut down on the caffeine and you will retain more of your water.   Look at what you eat, many foods can act as mild diuretics that will make you pee to no end.   Also no apres-ski beer, that too will make you a wiz master. Unless you are a hazing college student drinking gallons of water in less than one hour, no such thing as too much water.  I carry a hydration pack and drink all day....couldn't ski without it.

post #6 of 24

If you are drinking too much water while skiing you should let go of the rope when you fall.

post #7 of 24

I drink way too little.  Every time I leave the house to ski I bring my small hydration pack, and every time I leave it in the car because what the heck, who wants to carry stuff, and I don't tend to get thirsty when I'm cold.  So I fail to 'tank up' and 3-4 hours later get the headache-nausea-irritability that comes with being really dehydrated.

 

Anyhow, I recall learning in my park ranger days that the body takes up diluted OJ or electrolyte drinks faster than water, which makes it more available to the parts of you that need it.  IMHO, having to take frequent nature breaks is far better than kidney stones or headaches.  I add salt to my water, too, as my doctor recommends; apparently I have overactive kidneys that dump more sodium than they should.

 

That being said, anyone smarter than me may say differently--and be right.

post #8 of 24

If you only drink extra water when you ski, then your body does not know what to do with it and just dumps it.

 

Gradually increase the amount of water you drink on a daily basis..... you'll be suprised at how much water you end up drinking once your body figures out how to deal with it.

post #9 of 24

Oops, you said cramps--we treated our post-hike crampy dehydrated park visitors' leg cramps with chips--that is, salty food--along with diluted OJ or sports drinks.  Apparently that's often the cause.  I guess fitness goes into the cramp equation, too; many of said visitors were either new to vigorous exercise or had been running around the high desert backcountry at a higher level than their normal level of fitness carrying only a pint of water. 

post #10 of 24

Do you have a camelbak?  If not, get one cause it's great for staying hydrated.

 

A tip is to drink little bit of water spread out the day rather than just hydrating a few times with a ton of water.  Drinking small amounts of water throughout the day helps your body replenish what it loses. Drinking lots of water at once only causes your bladder to get full.

post #11 of 24

I had a camelback.  I found I drank so much tasty water I had to add a catheter running back to the camelback.. Both problems simultaneously solvedspit.gif

post #12 of 24

I'm kind of anal about water and hydration when I ski in Colorado. Carry a small bottle of water with me, drink a couple of glasses before arriving to the mountain. Boot up make first chair and about 1 hr. and 30 min later  looking for the bathroom. Hate that. On the other hand I don't get headaches and feel good. Ditched the water bottle the last two days on the last trip and felt fine. Drink a glass and maybe a total of another glass during the day. I know that's way too little water but it seems to work for me.

post #13 of 24

 I drink a liter of water every morning, whether I'm skiing or not, and need several trips to the restroom before the 8:30 chairlift ride if skiing.  One more stop an hour later and I'm good until noon, when I normally drink a half liter.  I usually then last until 4 p.m.  I carry a half-liter Platypus water container that fits nicely in a goggles pocket and remoisten regularly through the day, without drinking more than a mouthfull at a time.  Fortunately, I'm only 10 minutes from home when my ski days end.

post #14 of 24

Oh, for heaven's sake, I never thought about sticking a small Platypus bag in my pocket.  I just thought well, I can't carry my lexan bottle in the jacket and I don't want to wear a pack so I'll just suffer the headache.

 

All that schooling apparently went to waste.

post #15 of 24

As someone else noted above, don't try to cram hydration. Drink more all week long and then don't worry about it when you ski. Or carry a small amount with you. 

 

I also suspect that the hydration is not the prime suspect for the cramping. Could be fitness or nutrient levels. Are you talking about side-stiches, or cramping in specific muscles? In either case, it can also be related to how you move. If your diaphragm doesn't move well (are you solely a chest breather?), then that can contribute. 

 

Elsbeth

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by blix177 View Post

  Any tips on how to hold the water so it doesn't just goes through you system.  And even with all the water I had (about 60oz during 5 hours of skiing) I still felt slightly dehydrated.  



Mo' salt and mo' carbs

post #17 of 24

i wish i had that problem my camelbak always ends up freezing!! i need to carry a bottle of water just incase... any thoughts on keeping the hose from freezing up?!?!?! Ski the East!

post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by smellmypheet View Post

i wish i had that problem my camelbak always ends up freezing!! i need to carry a bottle of water just incase... any thoughts on keeping the hose from freezing up?!?!?! Ski the East!



Only solution ive heard is blow as much as the water out of the hose back into the bag and tuck the hose as far into the bag as possible

post #19 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkiGirl View Post

Cramps are rarely associated with hydration levels.  More likely fitness levels.  http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/legpainandinjuries/a/muscle_spasms.htm



"The cause of cramps is altered neuromuscular control".  That's not a cause, that's a definition.  My muscles are cramping because my nerves no longer properly control their contracting?  No sh*t Sherlock!

 

I think conditioning is one key.  When I was younger and in shape, I never got cramps.  Now that I'm a weekend warrior and weekday couch potato I do.  I hit the chair first thing, and don't want to stop skiing.  Usually about 2 or 3 o'clock I am forced to go in for a change of fluids due to the legs telling me if I don't get a drink of water they will start a protest.  If I stop at around 1 or 2 and get a drink of water and pee, I'm good.

post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowyphil65 View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by smellmypheet View Post

i wish i had that problem my camelbak always ends up freezing!! i need to carry a bottle of water just incase... any thoughts on keeping the hose from freezing up?!?!?! Ski the East!



Only solution ive heard is blow as much as the water out of the hose back into the bag and tuck the hose as far into the bag as possible


I wear my 2 litre under my coat, hasn't frozen once. You have to get over the quasimodo look though.

post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by snowyphil65 View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by smellmypheet View Post

i wish i had that problem my camelbak always ends up freezing!! i need to carry a bottle of water just incase... any thoughts on keeping the hose from freezing up?!?!?! Ski the East!



Only solution ive heard is blow as much as the water out of the hose back into the bag and tuck the hose as far into the bag as possible


I wear my 2 litre under my coat, hasn't frozen once. You have to get over the quasimodo look though.


I carry mine inside my coat. No freeze ups.

 

Some camelbacks are winter specific and have the shoulder strap with the hose inside it. They also have a small pocket in the strap where the bite valve would sit that takes a chemical hand warmer. I haven't resorted to that, but do carry a pair of handwarmers for my hands and hose, if necessary.

 

Blowback can work but you have to be pretty diligent and if you sit back on your pack, you may force water back into the hose. Inside the coat is fool proof. You can also get smaller reservoirs that you can put in an inside front pocket that will help reduce the Quasimodo effect.

 

My buddy had his externally worn CB hose freeze the other day and we discussed ways to wear the pack outside but get the hose inside. We came up with passing the hose through a pit zip to get the bite valve and majority of the hose inside but keep the reservoir outside. This is untested but seems like a reasonable solution.
 

post #22 of 24

First off piss in the woods that is what they are there for. Nature pisses are one of gods gifts. Second stop drinking water earlier in the day so you dont have to piss on the way home. Third be a a man and hold it. Disregard all of this if you are a lovely lady.

post #23 of 24

Evaino is right--if you're well hydrated to start with it's a lot easier to stay healthy on the hill.  And good for you, too.  My problem is that my office and apartment are cool so I don't tend to feel thirsty until it's too late.  It helps if I add either a little lemon or hydration mix to my office bottle to keep it interesting.

 

Platypus makes a neoprene cover for $20 (http://tinyurl.com/4zkg275); Camelback's is $18 (http://tinyurl.com/4dh8fa5).  The Platypus version has a bite valve cover but I can't tell if the Camelback version has one.  I think MSR makes the same kind of thing, and mine is some other brand I picked up at Kirkhams or REI.

 

You also want insulation for the bag.  My small pack carries a 70 oz bag and has foam on both sides of the bag pocket.  Using the insluator, sipping frequently and blowing water back into the tube after drinking all help. 

 

I like the inside-the-coat idea, though.  Being smaller, I have smaller goggle pockets, so I'd have to refill a little bag pretty regularly at one of the noisy mid-mountain canteens that totally break my mood.

 

post #24 of 24

I find that taking small sips all day from my hydration pack helps my body deal with higher altitudes when I'm skiing out west. If I'm huffing halfway through a long run a sip of water usually gets my breathing back to normal. But this may just be for flatlanders like me.

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