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How about this ma (short turns)?

post #1 of 160
Thread Starter 

 

This is my new ma in 2011.

 

How about this ma in my short turns on black run?

 

Thank.

 

post #2 of 160

 Overall nice skiing. I see some opening and closing of the legs as you stand tall at the top and the pressure gets light and then you twist and drift into the bottom with heavy pressure hitting all at once. I would like to see the extension and leg lenghing be more directed down the fall line. (from the hill instead of just up). Keeping the pressure a little smoother from from arc to arc will allow a rounder line. Directing more tip activity and less tail moving out will help control shape and speed control by direction vs. braking with skidding. I would play with flexing the inside leg more at transition to allow the leg to climb the hill and accomidate the terrain as you shape it more around the corner. The stable upper body and overall good seperation of the upper and lower body is going to allow you to continue to improve these already strong turns. I would play with skate to shape turns. Aim for the sensaton of feeling the legs move under and thru the upper body to the other side to start new turn.

 

Good luck,

todo

post #3 of 160

Hi norman, very good skiing. I like your steady rhythm and how you are able to controll your speed even if its as steep as black. But I dont really qualify these as short turns though. Not quite. You need to be quicker. Now you are not quite able to use the rebound and the momentum to carry over into the next turn. And you deflect too far away from the fall line.

 

Your primary technique for turning here is a traditional up-unweighting movement pattern. You squatt a bit in the belly of the turn and then you extend into the transition. Then you initiate a new skidding angle and start squatting again. For short turns this is really not necessary. What you should do is to flex your legs through the transition and extend them into apex and try to make the high C last long and shape your turn round. In order to do this you need to be a bit quicker because if you are too slow gravity will kill your momentum. And when you are quicker your body trawels more straight down the fall line. If you flex through the transition your CoM will be lower and you get much better edging capabilities. A good drill is to grab your ski poles half way down and squat low for turning. This will prevent you from up-unweighting. It will force you to link turns and use the momentum to carry you into the next turn.

 

I like your right hand turn better. To the left your outside ski drifts away more. The reason is your hips. They drift out more in your left turns. From what I remember of your skiing earlier you show much improvement. Good work.

 

TDK

post #4 of 160
Thread Starter 

Thank a lot of you both very much.

 

How about this video?

 

This is taken second day.

 

ps. last video is taken fourth day.

post #5 of 160

norman, good skiing. Here your rhythm is ramped up. Good. However, be more forward oriented. A lot more. Try to over do it. Do the squatting drill I mentioned. Try to ski in a very low stance and brake forward at the waist. It will feel stupid but it will not look stupid. And it will be more functional. If you look at the turn where you are avoiding the other skier you have virtually no ski tip pressure. Annother thing to consider is that you have a tendency of going from a ) shape turning left through an upright I extention to a ( shape turning right. I would like to see more leg action. You are now up-unweighting when you should be using the momentum from previous turn and down-unweight. Keep the movement in your legs. If you manage to do that your skiing will be much more functional and you will be able to ski bumps as well. The reason you would have problems in bumps skiing the way you do now is that you would be passing over a bump at the same time you extend to up-unweight. Dont do that. Keep the movement in your legs. Work more from your waist down. Keep your upper body calm and facing down hill. Your head should not be bopping up and down. Check out the QCT threads for visuals. If you still have skiing time left this season try to work on your short turns. BTW, what skis are you on? I see little edge hold and turn shaping actions from them.

post #6 of 160

You do a lot of things right Norman, I'd spend as much time as you can on that steep black.  I agree with the comments above.  I think I would concentrate on making quicker turns, this will refine all your movements and maybe try to tip your skis more, generate more edge angle.

post #7 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

norman, good skiing. Here your rhythm is ramped up. Good. However, be more forward oriented. A lot more. Try to over do it. Do the squatting drill I mentioned. Try to ski in a very low stance and brake forward at the waist. It will feel stupid but it will not look stupid. And it will be more functional. If you look at the turn where you are avoiding the other skier you have virtually no ski tip pressure. Annother thing to consider is that you have a tendency of going from a ) shape turning left through an upright I extention to a ( shape turning right. I would like to see more leg action. You are now up-unweighting when you should be using the momentum from previous turn and down-unweight. Keep the movement in your legs. If you manage to do that your skiing will be much more functional and you will be able to ski bumps as well. The reason you would have problems in bumps skiing the way you do now is that you would be passing over a bump at the same time you extend to up-unweight. Dont do that. Keep the movement in your legs. Work more from your waist down. Keep your upper body calm and facing down hill. Your head should not be bopping up and down. Check out the QCT threads for visuals. If you still have skiing time left this season try to work on your short turns. BTW, what skis are you on? I see little edge hold and turn shaping actions from them.


 

Dear TDK:

 

Many thanks to your opinion and I like that way.

 

Next time, I will particularly notice my legs of action.

 

Sorry. This season I only have three ski days, next time or season I will try.

 

Besides, I am not sure you mention finally of question.

 

So I try answer.

 

My method is the strength that uses the up body to turn to move waist, then turn to move feet.

 

Norman

post #8 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post

You do a lot of things right Norman, I'd spend as much time as you can on that steep black.  I agree with the comments above.  I think I would concentrate on making quicker turns, this will refine all your movements and maybe try to tip your skis more, generate more edge angle.



Dear nailbender:

 

Thank your opinion. I thing this way will good for bumps or mogul as TDK say same way.

 

I like this opinion.

 

Norman

post #9 of 160
Thread Starter 

Real thanks all.

 

I post I ski bumps video.

 

How about this way? this is taken on third day.

 

 

And I post my all video for anyone.

 

I hope have fun enjoy it.

 

post #10 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post

Real thanks all.

 

I post I ski bumps video.

 

How about this way? this is taken on third day.

 

 

 

backseat too seriously, for this posture mogul skiing is impossible.

 

post #11 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post

Real thanks all.

 

I post I ski bumps video.

 

How about this way? this is taken on third day.

 

 


Back seat for sure but thats the way it is when you are making your first turns in bumps. And IMO its not the back seat that is the bandit here, its the up-extention. I like the video because it gives a pritty good visual of the different approach needed for stand alone turns vs linded turns. When you make a stand alone parallel turn guys like Norman needs to up-unweight. When you links the turns you dont but Norman still does it. Except that in bumps you dont need to up-unweight by extending into transition at all. For that you use the bumps to create the "up" movement. Look here, Norman extends to unweight at the top of a bump. Look what happens. He gets launched up in the air.

 

Norman001.jpg

 

Insted he should flex and keep the up-movement in his legs with just enough of momentum bleeding to his upper body to push it up just a little bit.

post #12 of 160
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post

Real thanks all.

 

I post I ski bumps video.

 

How about this way? this is taken on third day.

 

 


Back seat for sure but thats the way it is when you are making your first turns in bumps. And IMO its not the back seat that is the bandit here, its the up-extention. I like the video because it gives a pritty good visual of the different approach needed for stand alone turns vs linded turns. When you make a stand alone parallel turn guys like Norman needs to up-unweight. When you links the turns you dont but Norman still does it. Except that in bumps you dont need to up-unweight by extending into transition at all. For that you use the bumps to create the "up" movement. Look here, Norman extends to unweight at the top of a bump. Look what happens. He gets launched up in the air.

 

Norman001.jpg

 

Insted he should flex and keep the up-movement in his legs with just enough of momentum bleeding to his upper body to push it up just a little bit.

 

Dear TDK:

 

Many thanks to your suggestion.

 

This is one of my try practice action,

 

I will try to revise this problem next time.

 

Normansmile.gif

 

post #13 of 160

Hey Norman,

 

Have you noticed the stem in the bottom part of the turn?  This is caused by a late extension and inactivity of the inside foot.  The up motion in the initiation of the turn makes everything happen from the apex of the turn and after (which is too late).  Work on a more diagional movement into the new turn.  This will allow the skis to start working earlier in the turn and not overloading the end of the turn.  Keeping the upper body more stable and having the legs turn below will be helpfull.

 

Overall nice rythum and flow, but a little too much outside ski dominate.  A fun drill is balancing more over just one ski and turning it both inward and then outward on easier terrain.  Do this with both sides and then alternate 5 on one side and 5 on the other as you balance mostly over the one that is turning both in and out.  You will start moving diagionally as you change your edge from right to left.   Then take this movement into your short turns.

 

Good luck,

 

Ron

post #14 of 160

You probably don't know. Norman is one of the most well-known instructors in his country. He publishes ski instruction videos.

post #15 of 160



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

norman, good skiing. Here your rhythm is ramped up. Good. However, be more forward oriented. A lot more. Try to over do it. Do the squatting drill I mentioned. Try to ski in a very low stance and brake forward at the waist. It will feel stupid but it will not look stupid. And it will be more functional. If you look at the turn where you are avoiding the other skier you have virtually no ski tip pressure. Annother thing to consider is that you have a tendency of going from a ) shape turning left through an upright I extention to a ( shape turning right. I would like to see more leg action. You are now up-unweighting when you should be using the momentum from previous turn and down-unweight. Keep the movement in your legs. If you manage to do that your skiing will be much more functional and you will be able to ski bumps as well. The reason you would have problems in bumps skiing the way you do now is that you would be passing over a bump at the same time you extend to up-unweight. Dont do that. Keep the movement in your legs. Work more from your waist down. Keep your upper body calm and facing down hill. Your head should not be bopping up and down. Check out the QCT threads for visuals. If you still have skiing time left this season try to work on your short turns. BTW, what skis are you on? I see little edge hold and turn shaping actions from them.


 

Dear TDK:

 

Many thanks to your opinion and I like that way.

 

Next time, I will particularly notice my legs of action.

 

Sorry. This season I only have three ski days, next time or season I will try.

 

Besides, I am not sure you mention finally of question.

 

So I try answer.

 

My method is the strength that uses the up body to turn to move waist, then turn to move feet.

 

Norman



 Here he describes one of the important concepts of his method. Skiing starts from upper body. This explains why he is skiing the way he did in the videos. Some of your suggestions do not fit his method.

post #16 of 160



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

norman, good skiing. Here your rhythm is ramped up. Good. However, be more forward oriented. A lot more. Try to over do it. Do the squatting drill I mentioned. Try to ski in a very low stance and brake forward at the waist. It will feel stupid but it will not look stupid. And it will be more functional. If you look at the turn where you are avoiding the other skier you have virtually no ski tip pressure. Annother thing to consider is that you have a tendency of going from a ) shape turning left through an upright I extention to a ( shape turning right. I would like to see more leg action. You are now up-unweighting when you should be using the momentum from previous turn and down-unweight. Keep the movement in your legs. If you manage to do that your skiing will be much more functional and you will be able to ski bumps as well. The reason you would have problems in bumps skiing the way you do now is that you would be passing over a bump at the same time you extend to up-unweight. Dont do that. Keep the movement in your legs. Work more from your waist down. Keep your upper body calm and facing down hill. Your head should not be bopping up and down. Check out the QCT threads for visuals. If you still have skiing time left this season try to work on your short turns. BTW, what skis are you on? I see little edge hold and turn shaping actions from them.


 

Dear TDK:

 

Many thanks to your opinion and I like that way.

 

Next time, I will particularly notice my legs of action.

 

Sorry. This season I only have three ski days, next time or season I will try.

 

Besides, I am not sure you mention finally of question.

 

So I try answer.

 

My method is the strength that uses the up body to turn to move waist, then turn to move feet.

 

Norman


Here he describes the most important concept of his method. His skiing starts from upper body. This is why he skied the way he did in the videos.
 

post #17 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post

 A fun drill is balancing more over just one ski and turning it both inward and then outward on easier terrain.  Do this with both sides and then alternate 5 on one side and 5 on the other as you balance mostly over the one that is turning both in and out.  You will start moving diagionally as you change your edge from right to left.   Then take this movement into your short turns.

 

Good luck,

 

Ron



Norman thinks one ski turn has no value. This has been debated to death betwen him and others. He believes in 50/50 on both feet whatever that means.

post #18 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

 

 BTW, what skis are you on? I see little edge hold and turn shaping actions from them.


I have been reviewing Norman's writting so I know the answer. Due to the superiority of his method, equipment does not matter to him that much. He is on rental and he is very happy with it. It only takes a little time for him to get used to it. 

post #19 of 160

He says in 3 days he made "vast improvement" on his skiiing. He describes his skiing in the videos as relax, elegant, and dynamic. These are his own words. I post here because I am so jealous of him and improve so slow like a turtle. He also calls me "shameless".  He has announced long before the trip that he will be level 9 or appraoching level 9 after 3 skiinfg days. Now he has skiied more than 3 days and made "vast improvement". We will have to assume he is level 9 now. He also declare he can ski like the following video within 100 skiing days. Does this mean he can become one of the best skiers in the world in 100 days?

 

BTW, he is banned from disccusing skiing with his followers by his wife as a price to ski this time. He is speaking thru lelo now. Lelo is welcome to correct me.

 

post #20 of 160

Hi Norman,

I'm not a ski instructor like most of the others posting in this thread, but I thought I would share some insights I had when first learning how to ski.

 

During my first year I noticed that I could turn quite easily at high speeds, but at lower speeds things were different; I seemed to have two ways to turn.  As my high speed turns seemed to be working (actually at that time in my high speed turns I was just leaning into the turn,  and just like riding a bicycle, the more I leaned the more I turned not a very safe way to turn - no room for error), I thought about how I turned at slow and moderate speeds.  It seemed that I had understood that if my skis were pointed across my current direction I would turn, and I had to do something to get them to point across my path.  I was, at the time twisting my skis across my path  I was also smart enough to unweight them so they would turn easier and then let my weight come to them so they would dig into the snow and turn me.

 

My first big improvement in slow and moderate speed turns came when I realized that if instead of twisting the unweighted ski to make them turn, I could just put more weight on the tips once I had just a little bit of direction direction change in the skis.  The extra drag on the tips turned the skis for me.

 

My second big improvement came when I realized the key was what the ski was doing on the snow.  If you tip a ski that is bent into a curve it will carve a turn along it's edge.  All I had to do was tip the ski at high speeds and the slight curve in the ski was sufficient.  In deep snow the ski is already curved due to support of the snow all along it and load at the middle, so all I had to do was tip it.  At low speeds on hard snow I had to weight the front of the ski to bend it a little bit more and tip it.   Although I was actually skiing this way for a long time time before I realized it,  once I knew what was happening,  my skiing improved a lot.  With a modern ski just tipping it while keeping your weight on it will cause it to bend; it is now bent and tipped and will turn you.  You don't have to turn it. Let the snow do the work.

 

post #21 of 160

In 100 days.  That depend on the power of his mind to shape his reality.  He has the right attitude, but this still comes to mind.

post #22 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post

Hey Norman,

 

Have you noticed the stem in the bottom part of the turn? 

 

Norman says many people care about skiing parallel but he never cares what the 2 skis are doing. What he cares about is the consistentcy of whole body. His skiing will become prittier when his body move correctly. He will worry about skis after his is skiing pritty. This is his own words translated into English.

post #23 of 160

The reason I post here because I thought this norman is fake. He is so kind and humble here. Not like the one we know but now I know this is true norman based on his response from other side.

 

norman is talking down to the skier (beg2) in the video after coming back from the skiing trip. norman says beg2 has practiced so many years but only sking like so so. Norman says his own skiing is much more elagan and relax than beg2. He tells beg2 that he is already on a different level (level 9?). He is really already better than what the videos have shown.

 

post #24 of 160

Norman says he can ski better than this person in 9 more days. They all want each other to post the videos here but no one did for some reason. I post it here for them.

 

 

post #25 of 160

If they don't want their videos posted here, you shouldn't post them.

post #26 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

If they don't want their videos posted here, you shouldn't post them.



 

 They want their videos posted here but just not by themself. The skier in the video in the previous has clearly asked norman to post vhis video here but norman did not for some reason

post #27 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by goatrider View Post
BTW, he is banned from disccusing skiing with his followers by his wife as a price to ski this time. He is speaking thru lelo now. Lelo is welcome to correct me.

 

 


Sorry! My english is difficult to speak such a complicated thing.But if norman have given me a post, I wiil post it for him.

post #28 of 160

I see.  Carry on.popcorn.gif

 

What are Norman's other sports/arts?

post #29 of 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I see.  Carry on.popcorn.gif

 

What are Norman's other sports/arts?


Norman hates sports. The only time he works out is for the strength required to carry his skis. He freely laughed at poeple who work hard to improve. He does not understand why people don't just study his method which is easy, relax and can make "vast improvement" in a very short time.

 

I do not make it up. These are translation fromthe actual text written by Norman
 

post #30 of 160



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post

Real thanks all.

 

I post I ski bumps video.

 

How about this way? this is taken on third day.

 

 


Back seat for sure but thats the way it is when you are making your first turns in bumps. And IMO its not the back seat that is the bandit here, its the up-extention. I like the video because it gives a pritty good visual of the different approach needed for stand alone turns vs linded turns. When you make a stand alone parallel turn guys like Norman needs to up-unweight. When you links the turns you dont but Norman still does it. Except that in bumps you dont need to up-unweight by extending into transition at all. For that you use the bumps to create the "up" movement. Look here, Norman extends to unweight at the top of a bump. Look what happens. He gets launched up in the air.

 

Norman001.jpg

 

Insted he should flex and keep the up-movement in his legs with just enough of momentum bleeding to his upper body to push it up just a little bit.



lelo asked a question about typo as the following:

 

1. stand alone turns

2. linded turns (linked ?)

 

After the typo is clarified, Norman (thru lelo) offers his explaination.

 

1. stand alone turns ( the technique over serveral bumps and using rut to turn)

2. linded turns (linked ?) (the technique used by racer that goes straight down the fall line)

 

You don't really understand what tdk is saying. On this slope, it is ok to use 1 on the first half, but 1 is not suitable on the second half ......

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