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A "carving" injury (iliopsoas)?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have developed some pain in the upper thigh that is a bit of a mystery to me. Was wondering if anyone else has experienced it.

The discomfort is located at the very top of the thigh. If you put your hand in your pocket, the symptoms are a few inches down. Sitting down, it is just below the bony prominence of the pelvic bone. It is the muscle or ligament that fires when, from a seated postion, you lift your leg off the floor. And when assuming skiing stance, I get the pain when I rotate from an angulated postion.

I skied the last two days and had a real hard time skiing any real distance without stopping and resting because this seems to support the leg in a natural ski stance, especially when carving.

I went on line and think that what is invloved is the tensor faciae latae or perhaps the iliopsoas muscle. I have found some exercises that seem to hit the spot.

I am anxious to figure this out because I have a two week trip to Vail in two weeks. It will not be much fun with this leg pain.

Appreciate any help.

David

post #2 of 12

Man, you and I may have to ski the bunny slope together all week!

 

 

just kidding.  good luck with that.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Man, you and I may have to ski the bunny slope together all week!

 

 

just kidding.  good luck with that.


Ya, with your shoulder and my leg....


 

post #4 of 12

been using the pulley thing you gave me by the way d1 and it is really great.  good weekend of skiing and two really successful 2 hour private requested lessons this weekend.  bad news is my shoulder is worse now, I don't really know why since I didn't jam it or anything.

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

been using the pulley thing you gave me by the way d1 and it is really great.  good weekend of skiing and two really successful 2 hour private requested lessons this weekend.  bad news is my shoulder is worse now, I don't really know why since I didn't jam it or anything.


Dude, stop hijacking my misery. wink.gif
 

post #6 of 12

Is your pain symetrical? Do both legs hurt or just one? I presume you had no falls recently that might have caused the injury as you don't mention any. Any swelling? Bruising? Tender to touch or just to move?

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

MR, pain is limited to the right side. I have had no falls or other injuries. No obvious swelling or bruising. Left and right sides symmetrical.

The more I read the more I think the issue is with the iliopsoas muscle. It apparently gets aggrivated with strenouous physical activities. Squats, and that kind of activity, are one trigger. While I do not do squats, I do heavy seated rows (180-190 lbs). I do these with knees bent. There is a significant amount of pressure right in the top of the thigh when you extend and contract at the waist, especially with the first and last rep which require a forward movement at the waist.

I have tried some exercises that I found on line. The one that really seems to hit it is essentially a lunge. Definitely engages that muscle and feels better after doing it. I also designed one of my own - put hands on hips and rotate hips in a circular motion as if using a hula hoop. This opens up the entire range of motion, while the lunge is one plane.

MR, any experience with this?

Thanks,

David

 

Archives:http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/13254/iliopsoas-pain-lisamarie-and-pt-s-help-please 

post #8 of 12

I feel sore in the area you describe after a day of touring. The motion and continuous lifting just makes me ache there.

 

If you work out at a gym, you may want to see if there is someone you can ask or hire to give you advise on your routine. Certainly isolate your activities and try to identify what might be the source of the problem. I am not inclined to think carving is the issue unless you hooked up or forced something while you had your edges engaged.

 

Have you been for a long drive lately? I often get pains in the hip and legs after I've driven a long distance. I use cruise control to try to allow my lower body to relax while travelling.

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

MR, I suspect we are experiencing the same phenomenon.

I did not mean to suggest that carving caused it. But I really feel it when I angulate, counter and load that leg.

I skied one day two weeks ago and did not have the problem. Then skied yesterday and day before. Saturday it was troublesome, but manageable. Yesterday, I was powder skiing (yes, in Maine) in about 14" of cut up and very heavy crud (Maine version of Sierra Cement - lets call it Down East Granite). I am not much of a mogul skier, and rarely get the chance to ski soft ones. It was a perfect learning day. So I spent most of the day on the steeps where moguls were just forming. It was a lot of work. Have to says that my moguls skills got a real boost. But as the day went on, the symptoms intensified. Not really pain, just a feeling that muscle that was firing was exhausted. By 2:30, I could not ski more than 500' (even on the flats) without having to stop and rest it.

I really think I planted the seed at the gym sometime over the past two weeks and skiing two consecutive hard days aggrivated it.

Will take your advise and ask one of the trainers for some suggestions. Will ice it, take NSAIDS, be good at the gym and just hope that it clears up in the next two weeks.

Its always something....

Thanks MR.

D

post #10 of 12

 I used to have lots of issues with a tight psoas. It will help to go see a pt who can release it, or sometimes I would lie on my back and just push down in there (beneath the bony part of your hip) where you can feel the knot. That's what the therapist will do. You can also DIY  by lying down on a ball, like a tennis or softball, face down on the floor, arch your back a little until you hit it. It will most likely hurt. It hurts when the pt does it, too. It can get very tender.

 

That lunge stretch is a good one. Good luck!

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

 I used to have lots of issues with a tight psoas. It will help to go see a pt who can release it, or sometimes I would lie on my back and just push down in there (beneath the bony part of your hip) where you can feel the knot. That's what the therapist will do. You can also DIY  by lying down on a ball, like a tennis or softball, face down on the floor, arch your back a little until you hit it. It will most likely hurt. It hurts when the pt does it, too. It can get very tender.

 

That lunge stretch is a good one. Good luck!


working it yourself is probably best done once a PT has shown him how - its an area that is easily aggravated, and depending where you poke around, the femoral nerve runs through there, so you want to be careful.

 

I agree with the suggestion of seeing a physio or athletic therapist. Assuming you find a good one, it should serious expedite the recovery process. Sounds like you are right on it being the psoas or iliacus (iliopsoas doesn't technically exist - it's iliacus and psoas). They are the only two hip flexors that work above 90 degrees. I wonder if you have developed what is sometimes called  anterior femoral glide syndrome. Google it for more, but basically it occurs when hip flexors are too tight and glutes are too weak, which causes the femoral head (top of the thigh bone) to be pulled unaturally into the acetabulum (the socket bone in the hip's ball and socket joint). This can then result in pinching of the labrum (soft tissue that surrounds the acetabulum). The weak glute can force the TFL (tensor fascia latae) to have to do too much, which makes it fatigue and thus get painful. 

 

"lower crossed syndrome" is another term for the postural condition that causes anterior femoral glide syndrome.

 

desk sitting and lots of time at a desk also contribute. And for some people the bony structure of their hip can exacerbate the problem. 

 

So basically work your a$$ off, stretch your hip flexors (but not to a point of pain - be gentle if they are inflamed), and stay away from weight lifting exercises that put you in a position where your torso to leg angle is < 80. So - for now - avoid the seated row, and bilateral squats or deadlifts. 

 

And I'll just get on my "machines suck" soap box to suggest you should avoid seated rows anyhow. :)

 

Good luck!

 

Elsbeth

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Friends, thanks for the information and advice. I will behave in the gym, do the stretches, eat Aleve and right now I am chillin' with an ice pack on the affected area. When I got home this evening and described my symptoms to my wife she told me that she recently treated for the same condition attributed to running. We share everything.

David

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