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Working on the First Half of a 2 Ski Quiver for Northeast Skiing

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

I'm looking for some advice on a two ski quiver for Northeast skiing.  After reading and researching the posts here, I've decided to shy away from an all mountain one ski quiver in search of a solid pure on piste Northeast ski and a mid fat (88 or so) for the occasional NE powder day and for trips out West.  I'll rent out West for heavy deep powder days.

 

I'm 48 5'8" 160 pounds and a solid athletic 7+ skier, tend to ski bigger faster mid to large radius turns, but aspire to perfect shorter quicker turns and explore more difficult terrain.  

 

Love what I've been reading here about the Kastle line.  Any suggestions on which Kastle or suitable alternative (74 or narrower ?) for the first half of this quiver would be appreciated.  Thanks for all the help.  I've found a ton of helpful information on this site.  I'd also like to buy whichever skis I settle on from one of the site sponsor/supporters.

post #2 of 20

In my opinion, your best bet will be a pure race SL skis like Atomic Fischer, Head, Rossi..

 

If not some cheater GS skis with 15-16m radius.. I had Fischer RC4 WC RC  

in 170 - 15M loved them... It's not a SL ski sidecut, neither GS ski sidecut, but right in between...

post #3 of 20

Kastle RX12 is a cheater GS type ski and by most accounts is a great ski. I'd look at an SL type ski if you want to work on your short turns or ski at smaller places normally.

 

You could check out the Fischer Progressor 8 or 10, Head Icon TT 80.0 or Supershape, Dynastar Contact Groove.

 

There are always the detuned race skis like the Kastle RX SL, Fischer WC SC, Elan SLX non-FIS, Atomic D2 SL non-FIS, Stockli Lasers, etc. as well.

post #4 of 20

Just to be sure;

 you are looking for the on -piste part of an Eastern quiver?

 If so, 88 seems a bit on the wide side

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.7 would be worth a look at that waist size

post #5 of 20

My "go to" ski in the East is a 170cm Blizzard Magnum 7.6.  I'm level 8ish, 6 '2", 175, so they're a bit short.  Works well in bumps, ice, some fresh snow, etc.  I was up in Stowe this weekend when ~10" of pretty heavy snow fell, and the Blizzard's worked OK (i.e., they weren't exactly relaxing, but it was doable).

 

I do have narrower skis (72 under foot), but I really don't use them that much.  i.e., unless there's been a thaw / refreeze, or I know I'm not leaving the groomers, they stay inside.  There's usually enough "soft-ish" snow on the trail sides that I find that a slightly wider ski really helps smooth things out.

 

My "wide" skis are Kastle MX88's.  I've used them in New England on hard snow, soft snow, out West in everything from "scratchy" to 15" of powder, and they handled everything with ease...  The only reason I don't use them every day is because I'm afraid of smacking them on a rock (i.e., Kastle's = not cheap).

post #6 of 20

My go-to ski for eastern skiing is a Head i.Supershape Magnum in a 177.  It has great grip on boilerplate, works a ton of turn shapes, also works well in soft stuff, bumps, etc.  It's a great ski.  71mm underfoot, so a little wider than a full-on race ski or cheater race ski.  I've yet to try the i.Supershape Titan, which sounds like a better go-to if you want a bit more off-piste versatility (though the Magnum works fine in western soft snow - even deeper stuff - though it requires more work than a wider ski).

 

The Magnum has been a great ski, with race construction in a more forgiving setup.  The Fischer Progressor 10+ is another option that would likely work well in the same guise.

 

(Note that my other go-to skis are all SL and GS racing skis, or a pair of i.Supershapes in a 175.)

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by avamb View Post

I'm looking for some advice on a two ski quiver for Northeast skiing.  After reading and researching the posts here, I've decided to shy away from an all mountain one ski quiver in search of a solid pure on piste Northeast ski and a mid fat (88 or so) for the occasional NE powder day and for trips out West.  I'll rent out West for heavy deep powder days.

 

I'm 48 5'8" 160 pounds and a solid athletic 7+ skier, tend to ski bigger faster mid to large radius turns, but aspire to perfect shorter quicker turns and explore more difficult terrain.  

 

Love what I've been reading here about the Kastle line.  Any suggestions on which Kastle or suitable alternative (74 or narrower ?) for the first half of this quiver would be appreciated.  Thanks for all the help.  I've found a ton of helpful information on this site.  I'd also like to buy whichever skis I settle on from one of the site sponsor/supporters.

All of these like mid-radius turns. I would look at something with a 14-16m radius.

 

Kastle RX12 in 168cm would absolutely rip.  They are hard to find; I think I have a pair, but they were hard to track down.

Stockli Laser SX in 170cm, or Laser CX.  See my review over in the "Member Gear Review" forum.  Equal to the Kastle, a bit different in feel; we have sold several SX's and everyone has been beyond pleased.

Blizzard Supersonic: powerful frontside carver, good in bumps, thrilling high energy ski.

Fischer Progressor 10+; lighter on the snow than the others, plenty of energy, great in bumps too

Elan Waveflex 14: a powerhouse on hard snow, a little stiff for off-piste skiing

Dynastar 4x4: another fun carver that is somewhat versatile, quite damp.

Head Supershape Magnum: great all-mountain ride, fun carver, great edge hold.

Nordica Spitfire: a pure carver, a turning machine, maybe doesn't want to run quite as much as the others.

 

I don't know some of the other brands well enough to comment
 

post #8 of 20

note on the OP's statement: (something to make) shorter quicker turns (to) explore more difficult terrain

If by more difficult terrain he means on piste, very steep, fairly narrow (which is what would make on piste more difficult) then a ski which is difficult to release from the tail edge, that is a ski that wants to hold the edge for the entire turn before rebounding to the other edge of the next turn, is going to be a nightmare on terrain which is at the upper end of the OP's ability. One slalom turn at the top of a harrowing line is going to cause acceleration, not speed control. The recreational carvers mentioned above are far more suitable than suggestions of pure race slalom skis, IMO, due to the versatility of possible turn styles and techniques, some with edge release to smear off speed. Some Skier Cross models are also very good.

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 

Based on all the responses, I guess its fair to say that everyone has differing opinions on the many skis that are available in this category.  So I'm going to narrow it down to the following.  I'm leaning toward the Kastle line, a Progressor 10+, and maybe the Blizzard magnum 7.6.  Docbrad66, the 88's would actually be the off piste/powder half of the Eastern 2 ski quiver.  Possibly an MX 88 if they aren't too stiff for a lighter 7+ level skier like myself.  Any opinion's here would be appreciated.  Not sure about the difference between the Kastle RX 12 and the RX SL. I'll have to do some research, but again any opinions here would be appreciated as well.  Dawcatching, could you pm me with some info on the RX 12's if you have them and they're available for sale?  Thanks to all for the replies.  

post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 

I decided to go with an MX 78 in a 168.  I didn't get to demo this ski but based on what I've read, I think this might be the best of all worlds for what I"m looking for.  I've skied the LX 82 and thought this might be similar but a little more aggressive.  Thanks for all the responses.  

post #11 of 20

88 mm skis make no sense off trail here they are simply to skinny. Off piste skiing is the east is in trees and the snow in the trees is variable and generally soft. 

 

post #12 of 20

^^^^ Well, OK, but he also said he wanted his wider to take west, and would rent a fatty out there for deep days. So an 88 would be more than enough for most trips unless you can schedule the snow to fall as you touch down. Agree that for back here 98-105 makes more sense for off trail/woods, but that's pretty wide for the "narrow," all-mountain ski he needs out west. 

 

OP: Do you want your "wide" ski more for powder in the east or all-around in the west? May produce diff recs...

 

Edit: Just read that you went with the MX78. Fine ski. But now makes getting an 88 just silly. Go with something in the 90's that has some grip. 

post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 

BushwakerinPa you might be right.  I went with the MX 78 as my on piste NE ski which I'm pretty sure will serve me well from NE hard pack through the occasional NE powder day.  I haven"t decided what to do about a wider powder ski at present.  Just want to enjoy the decision I've made and see where it leads me.  From what I've been skiing on, even the 78 is a huge jump up in width.  

post #14 of 20

good choice!

post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks Eastskier.  Beyond/Bushwakerin completely agree.  I originally thought I'd go with something narrower than the MX 78's but after a ton of research felt they were a pretty good fit for what I'm looking to do.  I'm going to take my time and demo some 90+ out West before taking another plunge.  And for what its worth, I dealt with Skiershop in VT and they were super helpful.

post #16 of 20

^^^^ Whiteroom here on Epic is Skiershop. Yeah, if I were you now, I'd think about a second ski 98-110. Many to choose from. Check out reviews by Dawgcatching, SierraJim.

post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 

Repeatedly reading Dawg's reviews is what made me pull the trigger on the MX 78s in the first place.  For the sake of my marriage, I'm going to stop reading reviews for a while, enjoy the 78s and replenish my bank account.  Its amazing how you can ski for over thirty years and still get so pumped over a new set of skis.

post #18 of 20

Kastle's have made a lot of eastern skiers (and others) smile. Welcome to the team. A friend, who is your size, gave up narrower carvers after demoing the MX 78 in your length and continues to love their performance in the east. At the shorter length, my friend states the smaller turning radius enables it to approach a narrower waist ski performance in tight turning situations. He also makes some great GS turns on them.

post #19 of 20

I have the Blizzard Magnum 7.6s at my small (250 vert) hill in Michigan.  But i have skied them out West as well.  I'm quite happy with them.  They go as fast as I ever want to go, very stable and good grip.  Nitpicks: good in bumps but not so forgiving, Not a super short radius turner.

 

Given my experience with them, as well as lots of comments on the 8.1s and 8.7s, I would think this could be nice East Coast part of your quiver.

post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply Doc.  The Blizzards and a few others where on my short list, but I ended up pulling the trigger on the Kastle MX 78s.  A slightly different direction from where I started, but I'm pretty sure I'll get what I was looking for plus a bit more versatility in an everyday NE ski I can grow into.   

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