EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › What's your view on hiking?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What's your view on hiking?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Just curious what everyone's view is on hiking for some good uncut turns?  I'm sure there are some real hardcores here who will hike several times a day, or hike up the backcountry.  As for me, I really HATE sidestep hikes, but taking the skis off and doing a boot hike really doesn't bother me at all.  Having said that, if I'm not skiing with my hardcore ski buddy, I almost never hike that day.  I prefer high speed cruising or easily accessible crud.  Most times, I'm only on the hill for a couple hours, so I hate to take a lot of time to hike...I'd rather take extra runs.

post #2 of 23

Hiking is great.

post #3 of 23

I used to hike the Palisades over 100 times a year. since my surgery, that number is going to decrease as I hike so slowly now. Hiking for 10 minutes or so to improve the run (in the resort) is a great way to ski better snow and less crowded lines, that are more exciting and interesting and beautiful. Four or five ten minute hikes a day is a good workout, brings some cardio into the day.

post #4 of 23

Fun to hike when the hike is worth it... My favorite all time was hiking the Bowl at Aspen Highlands during an ESA a few years ago.

 

...then there are days like my cat ride up Tucker a couple weeks ago... windcrust over fluff made it... well... "interesting"...

post #5 of 23

I don't mind short hikes, but if they turn out to be longer than I expected it can be demoralizing.

My big issue is hiking with the younger generation... because I am so sloooow (especially at altitude).  I push faster than I'd like, but they still get impatient waiting for me.

 

I had a great time last month at Wolf Creek (CO) with a lot of short hikes from the top of the chairs to the adjacent ridge lines.  All were probably well under 100 feet of altitude and less than ten minutes.  That gets you access to short but steep untracked lines down a small headwall or cornice.  

 

(On a previous trip I went to the top of Alberta Peak -- a long, long slog through at-times waist deep snow.  It took me long enough that my ski buddy [half my age]) was wondering whether to alert patrol by the time I showed up.  Oh, and patrol later told us we went up the wrong side -- the approach from the other chair is longer but less steep and had a real bootpack path.)

post #6 of 23

following a boot pack is far easier than post holing up soft snow. never bushwack. very dangerous, only for expert hikers, climbers.

post #7 of 23

Unless the lift-accessed is exceptional, I'd rather hike.  But that's just me.

post #8 of 23

In Taos its an integral part of the ski experience.  With over 25 named runs that require hiking, even after 4 seasons, I'm still hitting new runs.

 

First time up Kachina my wife cried while climbing up, due to the exposure aspect. When we got to the top, a fellow instructor who has only one arm and damaged legs was up there meditating. Kind of blew her away. Took her down Main Street, which was fine, till I saw her skiing on a really nasty snow section and yelled "Stay to the right of the Avalanche Slough.'  My personall recommendation, is to never use the word avalanche with a slightly overwhelmed wife while skiing. Ended up costing me two mulled wines at the Bavarian.

 

post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

following a boot pack is far easier than post holing up soft snow. never bushwack. very dangerous, only for expert hikers, climbers.


 

Sure.  It's not like we were out in the wild.  Alberta Peak is sort of shark-fin shaped with a ridge line going up from both sides.  The whole way is visible from the patrol shack, I think.

It looked reasonable from the bottom, and it started out as a boot pack.  It got steep and deep half way up.

 

The real mistake we made was made was not asking advice ahead of time.  Kinda dumb since the path we took starts at the shack. 

post #10 of 23

Not out in the wild, understood, but becoming completely exhausted can cause trouble, even at a resort. Because there are patrol at a resort does not mean that nothing can go wrong, obviously.

post #11 of 23

Hiking is rad. Long traverses with rocks in them are rad. Slow doubles with no safety bar are rad. Anything that discourages the instant gratification crowd is rad. One time I side-stepped all the way out on the East Castle hike to Hanging Chute. Instead of skiing Hanging Chute, I turned around and skied right back over the side-step traverse. Raddest run of my life.

post #12 of 23

^^^ what he said because then it stays untracked for much longer. Vail yesterday long traverse involving a bout a 2-5 min(depending on far up your speed carried you) uphill pole push/ not quite side step hill and then a slightly less obvious traverse. Untracked lines at closing. That little bit of effort discouraged people    

post #13 of 23

youll never know how good it is unless you go.

post #14 of 23

 

Often, the best place to drop in is right at the beginning of a flat or downhill section.  Once people climb to where the traverse flattens out, most of them will keep going.

post #15 of 23

Unfortunately, it seems everyone hikes. It's been a while since I've skied 'out west' but even ten years ago it seemed as though the hike to terrain was getting skied out almost as quickly as the rest of the mountain. The guy I was with saying stuff like "I'm on vacation, I bought a lift ticket... Why would I want to work?" My thinking was "I worked hard for the money I'm spending on this trip, why not work a little more for a better experience?" We went our separate ways. He sent a lot of time on groomers, I found some untracked and lots of lightly tracked powder (crud, I guess it's called, but far from cruddy conditions by my standards). So, yeah, I'll hike...

 

After recently suffering my first serious injury I'm kinda afraid to ski solo. I think about my day at Whitegrass (no lifts, all hiking) last spring and I think that was great fun, but dangerous, I shouldn't do that alone, what if something happens? When my bone is healed and If I can find someone to join me and, I'll go back... 

post #16 of 23

What's exciting about hiking for turns is you never really know what to expect. And the conditions can change multiple times during one run depending on where you are and what the weather is.

 

It's not for the unexperienced skier or the unprepared skier either.

 

But, the rewards are almost always worth the hike. I miss it

 

Haven't been anywhere this year yet to enjoy hike to terrain unless you consider the trees between Holimont and holiday "backcountry"? lol

post #17 of 23

My best hiking experience was a hiking out experience over on the backside in Verbier. After that, I like hiking :)

post #18 of 23

I hiked for turns for tow years before ever setting my butt on a lift, only because I couldn't talk my folks in to taking me to a ski area and buying me a lift ticket.

 

Thanks to fat skis resorts are nonono2.gifadding more and more lifts where we used to hike..  I would expect that trend to continue.  At my age I'm starting to see that as a good thingredface.gif

post #19 of 23

In the old days, every turn was earned :)

 

Hiking, skinning, bootin up, it's all good. Just be smart and don't kill yourself.

 

Alta has a lot of nice in bound hikes, you're lucky to ski there as your home mountian.

post #20 of 23

The some of the best runs are usually only accessed with some hiking. biggrin.gif

post #21 of 23
I enjoy it. In fact I will hike rather than sidestep even though the CB sidestep is the norm to hit some of the stuff here. I always ski with a small pack because I prefer strapping my skis on rather than carrying them. Personal preference...
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

...

My big issue is hiking with the younger generation... because I am so sloooow (especially at altitude).  I push faster than I'd like, but they still get impatient waiting for me...


Bad karma for them, though definitely not unknown. 

 

There's something about the pace of hiking that in moderation can make for a great day.  The mellow feeling after can be the same, whether it's something really mellow like hiking a pipe, or something really spicey. 

post #23 of 23

I did my first (brief) hike for a few extra turns last year (skis off).

 

At the top I realised:

1. How unfit I was

2. Hiking is AWESOME biggrin.gif

 

Best few turns of the season.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › What's your view on hiking?