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Best college for skiing - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 Like I said, all other things equal good school degree > degree from online university


Very true, but things are rarely equal, and once you've proven yourself on your first job there's even less of a chance that your fancy-pants degree will have any meaning.  You need to balance the wish to go to a big shot school with what it costs and where it is.  Very soon after entering the work force it won't make any difference.

Only when that first job is relevant to the field you want to be in.  If you're working retail to pay the bills and student loans then having a degree from a good school/program is still pretty important while you search for your dream job.  The degree is really just needed to open the first door to a real job. 

And by good school, I don't mean Ivy League or necessarily really expensive, I mean one with a well respected program in the relevant field of study.  The grad school I attended was just average, but it had a good and highly ranked business school with world famous professors.  The moral of the story and directly related to the thread topic is don't pick skiing over an opportunity to attend a school with a much better reputation in your chosen field of study.  You've got your whole life to ski, but that job of a lifetime opportunity only comes once, if ever for most.
 

post #32 of 42

I'd say find a school that has the program that you want/like and keeps your factors in mind. How far will you be willing to drive for great skiing? That could open up your option.  Definitely don't go to a school just because of its proximity to slopes. Although, if that is most important to you right now and you still want a good education then definitely do what JoeUT says:
 

Quote:

 


 

You'd be better off getting a degree at a second/third-tier school and focusing a lot of attention on interning and networking than walking around with a fancy degree from a great school and thinking that's enough to get hired. Unless, of course, you're going into something really specialized, in which case you probably wouldn't be on a ski forum asking vague questions about Ski U.

 

post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 Like I said, all other things equal good school degree > degree from online university


Very true, but things are rarely equal, and once you've proven yourself on your first job there's even less of a chance that your fancy-pants degree will have any meaning.  You need to balance the wish to go to a big shot school with what it costs and where it is.  Very soon after entering the work force it won't make any difference.

Only when that first job is relevant to the field you want to be in.  If you're working retail to pay the bills and student loans then having a degree from a good school/program is still pretty important while you search for your dream job.  The degree is really just needed to open the first door to a real job. 

And by good school, I don't mean Ivy League or necessarily really expensive, I mean one with a well respected program in the relevant field of study.  The grad school I attended was just average, but it had a good and highly ranked business school with world famous professors.  The moral of the story and directly related to the thread topic is don't pick skiing over an opportunity to attend a school with a much better reputation in your chosen field of study.  You've got your whole life to ski, but that job of a lifetime opportunity only comes once, if ever for most.
 


Mention of working of retail made me think of this article

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2010/0830/best-colleges-10-new-york-university-liberal-arts-higher-ed.html

post #34 of 42

I'm in the attorney general's office in SLC.  My division's law clerk transferred to the U of Utah this year from UNM law school specifically for the snow and got a student pass from Brighton for $600.  Last semester she boarded or skied  2 half weekdays and a full weekend day every week except for finals.  She also worked here 3 afternoons a week.  And aced all her classes.

 

Obviously, she's disciplined, studied hard and late during the week and on her one weekend day off from skiing.  This semester she cut her hours here because she got volunteered to run the pro bono law clinic at school, but still gets weekly time at Brighton. 

 

But that's law school.  Depending on your major and how disciplined you are, you should be able to spend a lot of time skiing.  I don't recommend living with other ski bums, though, because you'd be a cumulatively bad influence on each other.

post #35 of 42

I also found this eye-opening.  Unemployment appears to be quite a bit higher for non college graduates than it is for college graduates.  So what is very clear is any degree is probably a lot better than none. 

Stay in school kidsbiggrin.gif

 

 

Quote:
[Numbers in thousands]
HOUSEHOLD DATA
Table A-4. Employment status of the civilian population 25 years and over by educational attainment
Educational attainment Not seasonally adjusted Seasonally adjusted
Jan.
2010
Dec.
2010
Jan.
2011
Jan.
2010
Sept.
2010
Oct.
2010
Nov.
2010
Dec.
2010
Jan.
2011

Less than a high school diploma

 

Civilian labor force

12,014 11,773 11,437 11,858 11,828 11,800 11,803 11,758 11,383

Participation rate

46.1 46.1 45.3 45.5 46.7 47.0 46.6 46.0 45.1

Employed

9,898 9,924 9,545 10,068 10,003 9,995 9,955 9,963 9,770

Employment-population ratio

38.0 38.9 37.8 38.7 39.5 39.8 39.3 39.0 38.7

Unemployed

2,116 1,850 1,892 1,790 1,824 1,805 1,848 1,795 1,613

Unemployment rate

17.6 15.7 16.5 15.1 15.4 15.3 15.7 15.3 14.2
 

High school graduates, no college(1)

 

Civilian labor force

38,285 38,231 37,747 37,818 38,151 38,051 37,824 38,203 37,513

Participation rate

62.0 60.9 60.7 61.2 61.9 61.6 61.1 60.9 60.3

Employed

33,879 34,470 33,724 34,001 34,331 34,225 34,035 34,465 33,972

Employment-population ratio

54.8 54.9 54.2 55.0 55.7 55.4 55.0 54.9 54.6

Unemployed

4,406 3,761 4,023 3,817 3,820 3,826 3,789 3,738 3,541

Unemployment rate

11.5 9.8 10.7 10.1 10.0 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.4
 

Some college or associate degree

 

Civilian labor force

36,584 36,763 36,701 36,751 37,115 37,120 37,037 36,809 36,841

Participation rate

71.1 70.1 70.0 71.4 70.5 70.0 69.8 70.2 70.2

Employed

33,292 33,869 33,591 33,630 33,746 33,972 33,832 33,821 33,878

Employment-population ratio

64.7 64.6 64.0 65.4 64.1 64.0 63.8 64.5 64.6

Unemployed

3,292 2,894 3,109 3,121 3,369 3,148 3,205 2,988 2,963

Unemployment rate

9.0 7.9 8.5 8.5 9.1 8.5 8.7 8.1 8.0
 

Bachelor's degree and higher(2)

 

Civilian labor force

45,925 46,310 46,288 45,908 46,488 46,132 46,322 46,312 46,263

Participation rate

77.0 76.9 76.4 77.0 76.5 76.1 76.6 76.9 76.4

Employed

43,574 44,170 44,226 43,705 44,405 43,971 43,952 44,095 44,322

Employment-population ratio

73.1 73.4 73.0 73.3 73.0 72.6 72.7 73.2 73.2

Unemployed

2,351 2,140 2,062 2,203 2,083 2,161 2,370 2,217 1,941

Unemployment rate

5.1 4.6 4.5 4.8 4.5 4.7 5.1 4.8 4.2

Footnotes
(1) Includes persons with a high school diploma or equivalent.
(2) Includes persons with bachelor's, master's, professional, and doctoral degrees.

NOTE: Updated population controls are introduced annually with the release of January data.

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t04.htm

post #36 of 42

I would eb interested to see the rates for just a bachelors degree because that includes people with masters and P.H.Ds. The rate for people with two year degrees is not significantly lower than the regular unemployment rate.

 

edit: my initial comment was made obsolete by looking at the link for the table

post #37 of 42

 

 

Quote:
The rate for people with two year degrees is not significantly lower than the regular unemployment rate.

 

I agree, technical and associates degrees don't seem to make as big a difference as 4 year degrees do according to this data.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

I would eb interested to see the rates for just a bachelors degree because that includes people with masters and P.H.Ds.


 

I have the same curiosity.  But, I suspect removing the masters and PhDs wouldn't change much since there are so very many more people with 4 year degrees than there are with graduate degrees.  However, the unemployment rate of people with graduate degrees is probably significantly lower than that of just 4 year degrees.  Even so, there are so few graduate + folks adding them back to the massive population of 4 year degree folks probably doesn't bump it down that much. 

post #38 of 42

So, my kids two year degree from CMC was worth every penny. Plus the fact that 90% of the credits he earned transfered to the College he went to far a teaching degree.

 

College, like everything else in life, you get out of it what you put into it.

 

CMC in steamboat was good for our family. He got a degree, we got to visit and ski steamboat 5 or 6 times a year.

post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

 

Quote:
The rate for people with two year degrees is not significantly lower than the regular unemployment rate.

 

I agree, technical and associates degrees don't seem to make as big a difference as 4 year degrees do according to this data.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

I would eb interested to see the rates for just a bachelors degree because that includes people with masters and P.H.Ds.


 

I have the same curiosity.  But, I suspect removing the masters and PhDs wouldn't change much since there are so very many more people with 4 year degrees than there are with graduate degrees.  However, the unemployment rate of people with graduate degrees is probably significantly lower than that of just 4 year degrees.  Even so, there are so few graduate + folks adding them back to the massive population of 4 year degree folks probably doesn't bump it down that much. 



That's true but I wish you could also see a break down of the jobs ie blue v white collar jobs and see how many people are using there degrees. So many people have degrees now a days I wonder if the stark difference is the same people it has always been. What I mean is back in the 70's and 80's when a college degree was not so prevalent are the people with out jobs now the same ones that would not have jobs then and is the stark difference in unemployments rate simply a result of the fact that a majority of people go to college now?    

post #40 of 42



Holy sh*t.  I went there, except it was the American College of Switzerland then, and offered a far broader program.  It was the only possible first choice then.  I skied 100 days and transferred to Colby with full credits.  Thanks for the pictures!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brob2 View Post

There is only correct answer for this thread, assuming one wishes an English language school...

 

http://www.shms.com/

wiki here....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_Hotel_Management_School

 

201012201049402922.jpg

 

201012201016566853.jpg

201012201016586444.jpg

post #41 of 42

If you can't afford that (or get in) there is always the illustrious French Swiss Ski College

img002.gif

post #42 of 42


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post



Holy sh*t.  I went there, except it was the American College of Switzerland then, and offered a far broader program.  It was the only possible first choice then.  I skied 100 days and transferred to Colby with full credits.  Thanks for the pictures!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brob2 View Post

There is only correct answer for this thread, assuming one wishes an English language school...

 

http://www.shms.com/

wiki here....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_Hotel_Management_School

 

 

 

201012201016566853.jpg

 


 


Funny. After I wrote my SAT's (28 years ago) ACS sent me the package, offering some money and a job in the library.... still have a little regret at passing that one up.  

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