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2011 Stockli Laser SX 170cm w/VIST Speedlock Pro plate Review

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

 

Title:  Review: 2011 Stockli Laser SX 170cm, with VIST Speedlock Pro 11/15mm step-down plate. 

Length/size Tested:  170cm

 

Environment of Conditions:

I skied this over the course of 2 days.  Conditions were unusual for PNW: we have had inches and inches of rain the past month, and no snow in the past 2 weeks.  Temps have been in the 50's on the mountain, huge heat wave here in the Northwest.  As the sun is low in the sky this time of year, the snow is not softening up.  Conditions are ice/boilerplate with about an inch of sugar in top (from power-tilling).  Off-piste conditions, in any shady area, are almost unskiable; it is blue ice on any north facing slope.  Sticking to the groomers for the most part.  Tested primarily at Bachelor. 

 

Comparison skis were the Blizzard Supersonic IQ in 174cm, and the Blizzard Magnum 8.1 in 179cm.

 

 

Review: This is great testing conditions for this ski. Normally, I don't spend too much time on this narrow of a ski, as the snow conditions just don't call for it.  However, the past few weeks are much like the conditions one would experience East of the Mississippi than in the PNW, where we typically get a pretty constant stream of moisture (in the form of snow).  Not the case recently, obviously, and I was happy to get on this ski and see how it rips the hill.  I had time on it last spring and felt it was superb on manmade frontside snow at Winter Park.

 

First off, this ski is ridiculously stable for a 170cm.  It accelerates out of the turn, is incredibly smooth, and pliable. That big-turn, small turn, whatever radius turn I want to make feel is present on this ski.  Tail has moderate energy, tip is fairly soft for what it is, but the SX bites, and hard, on really firm snow.  Load up the tail and prepare to get launched, or just keep it low energy Super-G arcs and ski fast.  It will come around, and I loved how soft the tip was, really allowing me to work the ski. I am far from the world's best hard snow skier, but this one made me feel like a hero.  In feel, it was a very high-end feel: smooth, damp, powerful, muscular, light, maneuverable, yet insanely stable for a 170cm.  It was every bit as stable as my Blizzard 8.1 (in 179cm), which is a stable ski in itself, which tells you something.  This ski feels a touch more refined, more snow-hugging. It enters and exits the turn very predictably, but you can over-cook it.  I felt it skied best when the ski is worked with some patience. Allow the ski to go flat, then direct your energy into the next turn; be patient and allow the turn to set up, and you will be rewarded with a trilling kick in the seat of the pant across the fall line when it does bite.   

 

This is a fall-line rocket, or a big-turn arcer. It will do anything you ask of it.  It felt like a cross between a GS and SL, but forgiving and easy to stay on top of.  The energy on this ski was insane for what it was. 

 

Edge hold was nearly as good as it gets.  I didn't have a true race-stock ski to test against, but against consumer level skis, I am not sure any ski could beat the SX.  Neither the Supersonic nor the 8.1 did.

 

The tune was a touch aggressive.  Probably a bit railed at the tip, not bad though, and perhaps I would have preferred a 1 degree base bevel to the .5/.75 that was on there.  It didn't want to power-slide at the top of the turn and re-direct like some race skis: it always wanted to search for the edge, and then, zoom, through the turn you go.  A total powerhouse, but with a mellow character that no full-on race ski touches. 

 

VIST Speedlock Pro is a great setup.  I can't recommend it highly enough.  It really adds to the bite of this ski, most likely (I haven't verified that, but imagine that it is a big part of the difference between the Supersonic and this ski).  A fairly stout race plate gives the tail more kick, more power, and better edgehold.  This is a highly recommended setup. 

 

Forgiveness is again off the charts.  They don't get any more forgiving for such a high-end feel.  Sure, you could get into trouble on this ski, but you really have to be back-seat or way out of balance.  An ex-racer or otherwise skilled skier is going to feel like this ski is a Laz-y-boy with a Ferrari engine hooked up to it. 

 

Comparisons: Blizzard Supersonic: a bit more aggressive feel, slightly less damp, more muscular, not quite the edge hold, very powerful, shorter turning ski.  Blizzard Magnum 8.1: lacking a touch of edgehold, similar stability though, more suited to scarving the top of the turn to adjust direction, otherwise fairly similar in performance (stability, power) to the Stockli SX.

 

Conclusion:  one of the best skis on the market, for hard snow use.  They just don't get any better.   These are a couple of shots of me on the Stockli.  I was probably skiing a bit defensively, not used to the hard snow. Still, at least I am bending the ski up well, something I can't do that well at my weight on many big-iron skis.

 

2nd shot is trying to see how I quick I can get it across the fall line and back-lots of energy in that tail!

 

20110202-IMG_1864.jpg20110202-IMG_1816.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Tester Info:

Age: 33

Height/Weight: 5 foot 9/155lbs

Average days on snow: 30-40 days/year

Years Skiing: years skiing 23

 

Aggressiveness: Aggressive, ski fast all day.  You can log 14k+ vertical per hour on the Laser SX, ripping the Summit lift.  4.5 minutes up, 2.5 minutes down!  

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 23

Scott:

 

Can you compare/contrast the Laser SX to the Kastle RX/RX12 which I have as my hard snow ski now?

 

SX sounds like a great hard snow ski.

 

Mike

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post

Scott:

 

Can you compare/contrast the Laser SX to the Kastle RX/RX12 which I have as my hard snow ski now?

 

SX sounds like a great hard snow ski.

 

Mike


I can next week, when I have the RX12 here in the shop.

post #4 of 23


That would be great.  I've never been on a Stockli so I'll be interested in your comments.  Love the RX, big sweet spot, fast and great on hardpack and ice.

 

Mike

Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post

Scott:

 

Can you compare/contrast the Laser SX to the Kastle RX/RX12 which I have as my hard snow ski now?

 

SX sounds like a great hard snow ski.

 

Mike


I can next week, when I have the RX12 here in the shop.

post #5 of 23

One of the top 3 skis I have demo'd. Phenom edge hold. Super stable. Inspires confidence in slippery conditions.

post #6 of 23

Great review, thanks!

 

I skied the Laser SC for the first time last week and had similar results. I'm the polar opposite of you size wise too - 6'2" 260 lbs. This was the first carver I bought in over 10 years. I skied the 177 with a stated radius of about 17m but these skies can vary the turns well, as you said. I have a similar set-up too. Vist WC Race plate with Look PX racing bindings. (quick note about Vist Plates - they say for ALL bindings to 335mm bsl but they don't work with the tyrolia/fischer/head freeflex at that bsl. WTF? Oh Well, went with the look.)

 

What truly amazed me was that I could straight line these skies without a lot of chatter. They turn when you ask them too but don't scream for you to do it. I never skied the factory tune. I tuned mine with a 1&2 before taking them out. You are right about stability, the SC is a 63mm ski and you feel incredibly stable.

 

I've never been on a bad pair of Stockli's. They are amazing skis. I bought the SC's and Schmidt Pro (101mm) this year and they both rock. I don't typically ski on narrow skis but here in the North East we have some steep icy runs where they are the best choice. So far I've skied the XL, XXL, Schmidt (89mm), SC, and Schmidt (101mm) and, like I said, never had a bad ride!

post #7 of 23

Stockli still uses titinal (aluminum), which is one good reason why the edge hold is so good.  Wood (most Lasers) or foam (SC) core, they have edge hold.  The tail shape (I believe) helps for the ease in changing the turn radius.  Stockli manufactures quality skis.  How many non-WC skis come off the rack with flat bases any more?  Stocklis do.

post #8 of 23

I've liked them all but did not get enough time on the XXL to decide how much I like the iso core. All the others were wood core. The both schmidt models make you feel incredibly solid. The 101mm is actually easier to ski.

 

 

Johnny

post #9 of 23

Currently have the Laser SC (170), Laser SX 178 and Stormrider XXL in the quiver (and a few others).  The Laser SX just rocks; it makes you appreciate and really enjoy hard snow.  Not quite sure if I'll keep the SC, though I did run some slalom gates at Squaw the other week with the Masters programme, so it might hang around a bit longer.

 

Back to the SX (to avoid thread hijack). My stats 195 lbs / 6' /level 7-8 (8 on a good day) and being the wrong side of 50 a lot more cautious than I used to be.  All of my Stockli on piste skis are mounted with Speedlock TT plates.  I use the Vist 614 Free binding.  My ski tech (who happens to be the Australian Stockli importer) normally sets my skis up at +1 cm.  I got the SX back in August and the first time I tried the SX I thought this ski was going to kick my butt.  So I stopped, moved the bindings formward one notch on the Speedlock plate and went skiing again.  Second run was wow!  Fast, stable, then find a point to turn around and these things just hang on like a scolded cat.  Dawgcatching is most likely a far better skiier and reviewer than I'll ever be, so I won't be able add too much to his review; suffice to say, when the snow is on the hard side, the Stormrider XXLs will now be staying inside.

post #10 of 23

I want to try the SX now!

 

I was considering it when I bought the SC but I wanted the SC for a few years now so I decided to stick with my first choice.

 

Dawg, could you give a comparison between the SX and the SC.

 

Johnny

post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnysdg View Post

I want to try the SX now!

 

I was considering it when I bought the SC but I wanted the SC for a few years now so I decided to stick with my first choice.

 

Dawg, could you give a comparison between the SX and the SC.

 

Johnny

Hey Johnny,

 

I wrote a review of a bunch of sub 80mm skis that I tested last spring (all 2011 models):  http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/99620/2011-sub-80mm-skis-from-fischer-dynastar-kastle-blizzard-head-nordica-stockli-elan
 

post #12 of 23

Great review Dawg, as usual.  I have a similar set-up, but my skis have the Speedlock TT plate (not the Pro).  I absolutely love, love, love these skis.

 

Without hijacking your thread, here are a few comments of my own on the Laser SX's:

 

  • During my first few runs on the Laser SX's, I had a tendency to over-turn the skis, to "make" it turn.  It felt awkward.  The next run, I made a conscious decision to just lean them on edge, let the skis give me feedback, and see what happens.  Boy, what a difference.  The skis responded instantly, and the next few runs I was laughing my way down the mountain.  The edges just hold...and hold...and hold.  These skis, in my opinion, are the most fun you can have on hardpack. 
  • The ski is comfortable with turns of varying radius, and has a huuuuuge sweet spot.  Even if you decide to change the radius mid-turn, no problem, smooth as silk. 

 

For a frontside carver or hardpack ski, this is the best ski out there (in my opinion). 

post #13 of 23

Clax, it's funny you should say that about your first few runs as I did the same thing.   After my first run, my wife asked me how I liked them and I was noncommittal.  On my third run, I didn't try to make them turn, just got my weight forward and turned them on edge and POW!  It felt like they said, "Okay dummy, now you're ready to go," and took off.  Everyone that tries them seems to take three runs before the big smile comes out.  They encourage you to carve a turn properly and get a little more aggressive.  As you become accustomed to them you gradually learn to coax them into quicker, tighter turns but they are phenomenal in larger high speed turns.

 

My wife's should arrive tomorrow or the next day.  Yes, she had to have a pair once she tried them.  I'm sure we will play hooky for a day and spend some time on snow testing her new skis.  One pair has the Powerrail and the other has the VIST Speedlock Pro and 614 binding.

post #14 of 23

Hello.

Very good reviews.

 

I am 33 ,178 cm and 100 kg,advanced-expert skier (x-racer but till 95' so with old skis,I have a lot to improve in carving turns especially the angle of inside ski-I used to ski only on the outside ski).

I am skiing 99% on piste,depends on wheather the conditions. Usually snow in Greece is icy and hard-pack. After March very soft "like water". 

 

One question.

How do they (Laser SX) compare with Progressor 10+ , Elan Waveflex 14 and Waveflex 12?

I read your sub80mm review but I want your opinion specifically between them.

 

I own SL:Elan SLX 165,Nordica Dobermann SL Pro165,

GS:Elan GSX 176,

Cruiser:Progressor 8+ 165

and I am looking for a cross (both sl and gs turns)-cruiser-comfortable (not stiff as my race skis) for all day ski with 70-75 mm width for versatility.Progressor 8+ is perfect for the beggining of season but some soft for me after 6 six days of skiing and when my legs are strong enough.Also I want a ski that will help me to improve my tecnique especially in carving turns as I mention earlier.

 

ps:sorry for my bad english.

 

Thank you very much

post #15 of 23

Hi Anemar,

 

I can only compare the Laser SX to the Progressor 9+.  The Progressor is easier to initiate turns with and great for everday skiing.  The edge hold is good and it is stable in both short and somewhat long turns.  The Laser SX is one step up from the Progressor in stability and edge hold.  My wife and I feel much more confident on the SX in a race course as compared to the Progressor.  However, unlike a dedicated race ski, the SX is very forgiving and won't punish minor mistakes.   It is fun to use outside of the race course.  It is hard to describe the feel of the SX on the snow but it seems to flow across it with little vibration transmitted to the skier.  It really does help with technique as it responds best if you don't try to force or shove your turns, my worst habit.  Getting your skis out from under you and keeping your fore-aft position right will reward you with incredibly smooth turns.  You are more likely to get tired on the SX as I can almost guarantee that you will be pushing the envelope of your abilities with higher speed turns.  You don't have to but...who can resist?

post #16 of 23

can you compare it fith fischer progressor 10+ or 1000 if you tried that skis

 

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tkhachatryan View Post

can you compare it fith fischer progressor 10+ or 1000 if you tried that skis

 



Hi,

 

10+ is not quite as damp. It seem to have a little more energy, not quite as much grip, still a VERY good ski. The Stockli has an insane amount of stability for such a short ski; the 10+ gets kicked around at GS race speeds a bit more.  This really only comes into play at the very top end.  I would say the Fischer is probably 90% of the ski that the Stockli is.  

 

 

post #18 of 23

Don't mean to get off topic here, but have you tried out the Stockli XXL?  If so, would you mind doing a review on it/or general impressions (even a message to the inbox would be appreciated!).  I've been looking into this ski and wanted to know a bit more about it.  I currently am using the Stockli Stormrider from about 5 years ago that I picked up at a swap last year.

post #19 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dennyn23 View Post

Don't mean to get off topic here, but have you tried out the Stockli XXL?  If so, would you mind doing a review on it/or general impressions (even a message to the inbox would be appreciated!).  I've been looking into this ski and wanted to know a bit more about it.  I currently am using the Stockli Stormrider from about 5 years ago that I picked up at a swap last year.



I haven't skied the XXL in 2 years.  Owned a VXL and XXXL though. the XXL was softer (just a touch) though than the XXXL, very good in bumps, fun carver, damp, smooth, stable.  Really solid feel, although in the narrow 80mm width, I would probably rather have more of a carver and save that "all-mountain" ski for something with more width, like the VXL or the 95.  if i am going to go narrow, might as well get a true carver like the SX or CX.

 

Scott

post #20 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post


I can next week, when I have the RX12 here in the shop.

 

Id be most interested in that, have not found your test in a tread (at least not quoted here).

 

@ 40 6ft, 12stone 8ib. Have Volkl RaceCarver 198 (oldie but nice), Dynastar Powertrack LTD (racing atelier), Stormrider XL184, Laser GS 174. and looking for RX /RX12 ...

And i swear by my Strolz :-D (Have 2 pairs of Tecnica TNT & IconCarbon for raceday)

Oh and it all started around @17 with K2 712's Kastle RXnational team and then a graded pair of P9's

post #21 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
...

VIST Speedlock Pro is a great setup.  I can't recommend it highly enough.  It really adds to the bite of this ski, most likely (I haven't verified that, but imagine that it is a big part of the difference between the Supersonic and this ski).  A fairly stout race plate gives the tail more kick, more power, and better edgehold.  This is a highly recommended setup. ...

 

 

Pardon my ignorance... what are these?  The VIST website shows pictures but didn't give an explanation.  I assume this is between the ski and the binding, right?  What is it used for?

post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post

 

 

 

Pardon my ignorance... what are these?  The VIST website shows pictures but didn't give an explanation.  I assume this is between the ski and the binding, right?  What is it used for?


Yes, it is a riser plate that doesn't require drilling, and allows use of different sized bindings.

 

Scott

post #23 of 23

Thank you Scott for spending some of your time to give us this interesting insight. I am especially relieved from your thoughts on the Stockli Lasser SX (2011). In addition I'd like to share my thoughts on this topic.

 

I am 186cm / 85kg, somewhere between advanced to expert skier who decided to go for the Stockli, Lasser SX 2011 @ 170cm, recalled on the experience after owning another Stockli skis before. I find this skis fantastic. I've tested them for one day and honestly, it took me time on the slopes to get along with them. At first they seemed a bit demanding, but remembering all the critics and reviews red claiming "lay it on the edge and this skis will delight you" appeared totally useful! I had some slight weight transmission issues at the beginning of the day, but considering the fact that it was my first time on the slopes for the season it was a reasonable issue (although I've had intensive off-season preparations).

 

At the end of the day after trying and trying my conclusion is that this ski is absolutely lovable. I like going fast with middle turns, but this ski layed on both edges with equal weight transmission on the curve, gives you such an acceleration that freaks you out (positively speaking). Considering my personal skiing abilities and requirements I find this skis absolutely enjoyable. If I have to explain it character in one sentence it would be: perfect skis for mid length turns at a high speed. On longer turns, with proper edge canting the acceleration is enormous, and stability increases, that gives you extra feeling of safeness and confidence on higher speeds. On shorter turns they didn't appear best to me, since an extra effort should be put, which really does not match the purpose of this ski.

 

I personally don't reccomend this skis for beginner or intermediate (even new coming advanced) skiers since even though it's said that they are quite forgiving, you may still not enjoy them at their best. After all, recreational skiing shouldn't be considered competitively and vice versa, so choosing a right ski should match your needs with your abilities in order to get the top of yourself on the slopes.

 

Cheers,

Igor

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