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Review: SkiLogik Rave in Colorado conditions

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Posting on behalf of a friend, but from my own examination of these skis, they seem like perfect boards for the conditions seen on western mountains.  Read on....

 

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I found SkiLogik from a trusted source, Peter Keelty.

As for me: I'm 51. First started skiing when I was kid. My Dad brought me to Vail once a year, starting in 1969. We were poor, Dad had to fight with Mom to take me skiing. I had rental skis, jeans, and a bad attitude. Because of anger, resentment, and the 70s, I dropped out of skiing until 1998, when I met the Dumont Skunk. Since then, and with his help, I rediscovered my inner ski bum. In '03 we packed up our bags, sold the tree house, moved me and my familia to the mountains, to a little town once called Hole in the Sky. Since then I ski 4 days a week, all at either Vail or Aspen. I ski with young guys. I'm ultra competitive and I don't like it when anyone, beats me to the lift. I ski on the expensive part of the ski, not the cheap part. Bumps and the back are where it's at for me. But if it's covered and inbounds, I wanna make good turns on it.

I hadn't bought into the fat ski thang up until the great night when I found SkiLogik. Not because I didn't believe in the concept, I do. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to understand that more platform = more stability. My East of Vail, young ski buddies are all on big fat skis like the Hell Bents. It's work to keep up with them on powder days -- but I'd never tell them that. And the skinny skis had become part of my shtick -- "Yeah, but look at me. I'm way older than you, you're not waiting for me -- who needs 'em? All they do is take up space!" The real story was that I just hadn't seen a fat ski that appealed to me. The big fat skis were just that - just big, fat skis. Blah. Boring.

Then I found SkiLogik.

When I first looked at the skis what stuck out to me was not how pretty they are, and they're gorgeous. It was the turn radius. They had a ski (The Rave) that was 92 under foot with a freaking 15m turn radius. Hmm. Tell me more. So I started clicking around.

Then I dropped some cat named Mazz, he's the owner, an email. The dude replied to my email in the middle of the night -- my kinda guy. Then I sent him more email and he replied back in the middle of the night. Holy, Moly, Batman. I was really liking, this cat Mazz. His emails were thorough, he actually answered my questions. And, I could tell he was a skier. Then I called Peter and he vouched for them. So I bought some. Bought a pair of the Raves in a 175. I figured the worst that'd happen is that I'll sell them to my East of Vail, young friends. Bought a pair of Marker Jesters for 'em.

The skis came to my door a week later. Pretty skis. Lotsa camber. They came well packed in a box with stickers, a note from Mazz, and an owners manual. I felt like someone had sent me flowers. Took 'em down to my local ski shop to get mounted. The kid in the back was like, "Cool skis, dude." I felt younger.

 

SkiLogik Rave

My first day out on them was 16" of new, and I was first in line. I got off of Chair 8 and did my standard Javelin turn warm up down to Chair 2. They felt great. I started to smile. Then from the top of 2, I dropped into Ouzo Glade, where it was all me. The first few turns had never felt so good. Half way down Ouzo I turned up the gas. Better. Did my old guy air off of the ledge into the next section of Ouzo. "Foomp." Oh man, I was feeling great. Got to the bottom of Chair 7, smiling. Up 7 to Ricky's Ridge, one of my favorite lines at the Big Show. Feeling like a hooker with new shoes, I blow past a couple of guys on the track out to Ricky's with fat skis and stickers on their helmets. As I went by I hollered, "On your left." I could see the, "Who the $$%^ is that guy and how dare he pass us on the track?" look on their faces. Knowing I had stirred them up, I rubbed it in some more and gave them back a look of, "Come get some." I could hear 'em behind me.

I dropped into Ricky's and stomped on it. The Rave's have twin tips, so I'm throwing up a big tail of snow. Faster. Oh man. I'm feeling it, but not working hard. Hoo Rah! I get down to the Aspen's and look back. The young guys chasing me were still half way up the Ridge. Now, my smile is getting big. I take it easy the rest of the way. Saw the young guys in line at Chair 5. Now the look on their faces was, "Huh"? One of them was looking down. They were checking out my skis.

The rest of the day just got better, with each turn. I was having more fun than ever on a milk day and I wasn't working hard. My energy level was off the charts -- skating out to my lines, skiing faster than ever down them but feeling like I'm not even pushing it, skating back to the chair. I'm feeling great about my skis. If nothing else, I had definitely found a new powder ski. These skis are mine now, they're not going anywhere.

 

Rave sidewall detail

Then it was powder chop time. The Rave's made it feel like the chop wasn't even there. Now I was starting to feel how quick the skis are -- they're quick. In the afternoon I go to my favorite bump lines at the Big Show; Gangee Face, Prima/Pronto/Log Chute, and Highline. Oh man. I was truly overwhelmed, how great the skis felt. I just kept looking at them, shaking my head with wonder. I'm skiing solo all day, my chair riders were like, "pretty skis," or "cool skis - who makes 'em?"

By the end of the first day I decided to get rid of two skis in my quiver; my SuperShapes and my Monster 88s. I was down to just two pair of skis now -- my Raves and my Monster 78s.

I could barely sleep that night. Jonezing for more soft snow and worried that first day on my Raves was either a flash back, a dream, or wishful thinking, I got up and went out the next day. Same routine. The next day it was all chop, I just was so amazed how easy things were. I was blasting through the chop like it wasn't there. Man. Wherever I went, the skis just took me there. It was like they were telling me, "Master, your wish is my command." I could do no wrong. All my moves felt even better on the Raves. All my lines felt better -- by far. Then I started to lay 'em over. I was getting some deep tracks, but then again it was soft snow. But still. I know my skis and I was able to get better tracks on my Raves then I could on my Heads.

That week it came in another 11". I skied the next 3 days. Each turn, I just kept pumping up the volume.

By the end of I think the 3rd day on my Raves, my Monster 78s were for sale. I was down to one pair of skis now and couldn't be happier about it.

Last week at the Big Show it was warm on Friday and Saturday, almost springlike conditions. The snow got thick in places. My Raves were just fabulous in the thick snow. I could just rip down through it, not get bounced around at all. These skis were some kind of gift from above.

But for me, the nirvana day was Saturday morning: after a warm Friday, the back was frozen stiff in the morning. When that happens at Vail, everyone stays on the front side waiting for the back to warm up. Not me. I go right to the Back. For me, I look for lousy snow. The weirder the snow, the better. I believe, funky snow builds character. So I head to the back first thing Saturday morning and I got the whole place to myself. The skis were getting through the frozen coral like they had shocks built in. I won't say they made it easy -- no ski makes coral snow easy. They were holding the edge and I wasn't getting bounced around. I was cruising down through the coral and having fun. Laps on coral!

After that morning in the coral, I decided to order another pair of SkiLogiks. But this time, with my own graphics (SkiLogik let's you put your own design on their skis). God bless my Heads, but it was time to turn the page.

 

skilogic1.jpg

I've skied on them every day since. They're quick, they go fast, they're stable, they ski anything great. I don't go home tired. The other day after a full day I walked just as fast back to the car at the end of the day, as I did to the lift first thing in the morning. I've also noticed my legs don't ache like they used to. I've been skiing on metal skis for so long, I wonder if all the vibration was making my legs ache at times. But after two weeks on my Raves, my legs don't ache. Maybe it's the wood core? The skis have have a layer of carbon and rubber in them, maybe that has something to do with sucking up the vibration? I also haven't fell in since I've been on them. I've slipped twice, but not a fall. The skis seem like they have Quattro traction.

If you're like me, SkiLogik will rock your world. If so, then please support this great little ski company and go buy some SkiLogiks. I believe it's companies like SkiLogik that are the future of skiing.

BTW, I ski in jeans now. The 70s? One day at a time, man.

 

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Adding my own note here: they are beautiful skis, with top-notch construction.  The wood sidewalls are especially appealing, a marked change from the composite sidewalls that are common on most non-cap skis.  While I don't think they'd necessarily be the bee's knees for an eastern skier's one-ski-quiver, they certainly look like a great new offering for a western skier who wants a Swiss Army Knife that's different from standard fare.

post #2 of 20

I've always been interested in their skis.  And I believe the owner moved him and his family to China, despite being Breck based, to build their factory, hence the reason you/he rec'd an e-mail in the middle of the night, but I could be wrong. 

post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by thaar View Post

I've always been interested in their skis.  And I believe the owner moved him and his family to China, despite being Breck based, to build their factory, hence the reason you/he rec'd an e-mail in the middle of the night, but I could be wrong. 



 


Edited by quant2325 - 9/17/11 at 10:32pm
post #4 of 20
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I love them too- and I ski the east I first tried them in Vail in 175 and loved them. Then I got them in 165 for the east and they are very fun- it's like you are cheating in the bumps. Even on icy bumps.
I think the factory tune is better than the demo skis I was on in Vail (where they did NOThold the hard pack well)- with factory fresh skis on east coast ice they are holding really well.
I got a pair of the Front Burners for the east (84 underfoot and a 14m arc) and I might like them even better than the Raves for the east. They are definitely my every day ski (I was also a Head Monster junkie- still have four pair in various configurations!).
No shops carry them here however- got to do some work to get them.
post #5 of 20

I just remembered that I'd demo'd the Ski Logik Rave last season and hadn't reported on it yet.  I guess reviving this thread is better than starting a new one.  Anyway, my review is brief.

 

I tried the Raves at Squaw in spring conditions.  Ignoring the appearance, my first impressions were that they were solid (heavy) and had a lot of camber.  I felt the camber in the skiing.  It wasn't distracting, more like energizing.  I didn't really notice the weight while skiing.

 

My overall impression was that these were "tweener" skis.  The feel kind of split the difference between my 80mm and 98mm underfoot skis.  I had no trouble skiing the Raves, but no special joy, either.  They skied like what they were, 92mm skis, essentially wide carvers.  I couldn't test the carving, however, due to soft conditions.

 

Personally, I don't have a place in my quiver for a 92mm ski.  If it's powder, I want to go wider.  If it's firm, I want something quicker and lighter.

 

Me: 5'9" 150lb advanced/expert male western skier.

post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

Personally, I don't have a place in my quiver for a 92mm ski.  If it's powder, I want to go wider.  If it's firm, I want something quicker and lighter.

Significant point. I like a 88-98 for eastern soft snow and trees. But out west, cannot see the point, unless I am limited to one ski, and then my BMX98's are my current sweet spot, have also liked the FX94 and The One for that. If I lived in the west, I'd want a mid 70's to low 80's carver and a 110+ for the good days. 

post #7 of 20

I too loved the skis, until the season ended.  The wood tops were a mess.  After 18 days, the lamination was peeling back in numerous places, at some points the wood had deteriorated to the metal sheet.

 

 

1000

 

1000

 

1000

 

Additionally, the wood was beginning to separate down the sidewall.  The shop tech felt that this was due to shoddy construction.

 

1000

 

1000

 

For reference, I am on the National Ski Patrol and take excellent care of my boards.  My last pair of K2s lasted 10 years.  Ski Logik said that I was out of warranty and could buy a new pair for 25% off.  If you ask me, $750+ is too much to spend on skis that last 18 days.  I'd recommend going with a different brand.

post #8 of 20

Sounds like Ski Logik could have saved themselves some bad press by replacing your skis.  This is going to cost them more than $750.

post #9 of 20

That really says a lot if the maker declared them out of warranty after 18 days.

 

I'd expect them to treat a professional like yourself a wee bit better than 25% off, unless that is 25% off the pro deal you guys get, but what do I know?  I still have not successfully lobbied my local shop to hook me up.  I ski 120 days/year I just don't get paid for skiing.hopmad.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidMonkey View Post

I too loved the skis, until the season ended.  The wood tops were a mess.  After 18 days, the lamination was peeling back in numerous places, at some points the wood had deteriorated to the metal sheet.

 

 

1000

 

1000

 

1000

 

Additionally, the wood was beginning to separate down the sidewall.  The shop tech felt that this was due to shoddy construction.

 

1000

 

1000

 

For reference, I am on the National Ski Patrol and take excellent care of my boards.  My last pair of K2s lasted 10 years.  Ski Logik said that I was out of warranty and could buy a new pair for 25% off.  If you ask me, $750+ is too much to spend on skis that last 18 days.  I'd recommend going with a different brand.

post #10 of 20

I have never been taken with the idea of placing emphasis, of any sort, on the ski's top sheet. So I've always been skeptical of this company.

 

A friend is with them (many very nice folks associated with the company for sure), but he could ski anything.  The OP is really comparing skinny to fat, not one fat to another. He lacks the experience of comparative analysis.

 

So I go with my long held view: it takes decades to learn how to make a truly superior ski.

I'm certain that wooden side walls were tried and rejected long ago, for example. We have companies re-inventing the wheel and regressing about 50 years to do so. seriously!

 

One hint for top sheet preservation. Take your brand new skis (absent metal top sheet edge protector), and get some files and sandpaper, and ease the top edge, smooth rounded or beveled about 1/8th inch.  This will reduce the amount of grip and leverage your skis base edge can exert on the top sheet. I do this to all skis without a metal edge.

 

Any top sheet can be cut at the edge, but it is not acceptable for it to begin to peel up, IMO.

post #11 of 20

I should clarify, I only skied on them 18 days, however, they were a little over a year old (long story about why it took that long to get 18 days in.  Regardless, I did buy them directly from the company and they were made aware of my situation.  you would think that a company that stood behind their product would see the problem and replace them.

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidMonkey View Post

I should clarify, I only skied on them 18 days, however, they were a little over a year old (long story about why it took that long to get 18 days in.  Regardless, I did buy them directly from the company and they were made aware of my situation.  you would think that a company that stood behind their product would see the problem and replace them.


Do you own another pair of skis that you could photo side by side to compare top sheet durability? It would be instructive, as you used the same stance while skiing both pairs of skis, more or less.

post #13 of 20

I really wanted to love the Ski Logic's.  When I demoed them, I found them heavy and dead feeling.  They were OK, but not as good as most production skis I used that day.  I know people who love theirs.  Most of those people are skiers who I think are not very good.  I don't know anyone who is "good" who uses Ski Logic or who has demoed Ski Logic and loved them.  I was in the Tuning/Repair room at my shop a few days ago admiring the fancy new tuning machine we just got.  There was a pair of Ski Logic's in the bin that were hammered.  They had similar delamination and other damage to Liquidmonkeys pictures.  I was told most of the damage I was looking at came from one demo day and that the skier in question "thought" he was being careful with the skis.  The repair manager said that they have had other problems with Ski Logic and durability.  He echoed my sentiment that most boutique ski brands don't have quality control or durability figured out. 

post #14 of 20
Well.....I might disagree with you. As a level II PSIA alpine instructor (and doing level III this year) I think I am an OK skier. Pick your line or run and I can ski it. And I LOVE the Rave. Maybe better than Head Monster 88s which I found one of the best all around skis for the west ever. (and Head Monster 78s for the east). I have skied a pile of skis and can do so either at cost or free and I still pick the Rave 175 over anything else I have been on.
The nice thing about it is that there is no right or wrong- we can all like different skis and ski them well. There are lots of good options out there.
On a side note- I agree that Ski Logik should have done more for a ski patroller. I skied my SkiLogiks for the entire season with a couple of minor scratches on the edges but I kind of expect that with teaching on them every day and having students ski over them every day. You ought to see my Head Monsters after a few seasons!! (but I ski on the bases!)
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrbirddog View Post

Well.....I might disagree with you. As a level II PSIA alpine instructor (and doing level III this year) I think I am an OK skier. Pick your line or run and I can ski it. And I LOVE the Rave. Maybe better than Head Monster 88s which I found one of the best all around skis for the west ever. (and Head Monster 78s for the east). I have skied a pile of skis and can do so either at cost or free and I still pick the Rave 175 over anything else I have been on.
The nice thing about it is that there is no right or wrong- we can all like different skis and ski them well. There are lots of good options out there.
On a side note- I agree that Ski Logik should have done more for a ski patroller. I skied my SkiLogiks for the entire season with a couple of minor scratches on the edges but I kind of expect that with teaching on them every day and having students ski over them every day. You ought to see my Head Monsters after a few seasons!! (but I ski on the bases!)

 

Fair enough....   You don't have to like what I like and that doesn't mean you are "not very good"redface.gif  I also have access to a lot of skis for free or cost and while I don't demo as much as I feel like I should, I get on more than most.  I like almost every ski I have ever been on, some more than others of course.  I am hard pressed to think of many skis that I liked less than the 3 models of Ski Logic that I was on.

 

I really wanted to love the skis as much as I love the topsheets.  I am a sucker for wood and if I built skis or had skis built for me, I would want something that looked a lot like a ski logic.  There are problems with wood as a top or side material in skis and for bottoms on drift boats.  It's hard to effectively encapsulate the wood and it will eventually absorb water and swell destroying the laminate.  I think this is what happened to Liquid Monkeys skis.

post #16 of 20
I agree with the concerns about the durability of the wood top. I was concerned when I first got them. However, I just haven't had a problem with them.
I got two versions of the Rave- the stock model and then a much beefier cambered one that has a LOT of pop to it. You might want to consider the different flex pattern available with the custom models. Or if I'm in your neck of the woods, you can hop on my skis and try them out!
post #17 of 20

UPDATE!

 

Ski Logik has reconsidered and has agreed to replace my boards at no cost.  Apparently, the new ski design includes some sort of top coat that is supposed to prevent/reduce chipping.  As for the side wall crack, they are in agreement the it was product failure but, that can happen once in a while to ANY product.  I'm just happy I can keep skiing on the Charits.

 

teton - I too disagree that only skiers who are not good ski on these.  I have been a patroller for 13 years and have skied waist high bumps, icy bowls and rocky chutes - all with 250+ pounds of tobaggan, equipment and injured skier behind me.  I think I could be consideded a "good" skier by any measure.  For the short time I used my Ski Logiks, I enjoyed every turn I made in them.  If the new ones really do last, I will become their biggest fan.  That said, there ore dozens of skis out there and any one of them can be great depending on what you want from a ski and how it feels to the respective skier.

post #18 of 20

Good for you.  Good for them.  Public relations in the internet era can be tricky.  Next time, they'll know from the start how the dance goes.

post #19 of 20
I'm glad that SkiLogik stepped up. That is the company I have come to know- they have been very reputable and responsive.
Hope everything continues to work well.
post #20 of 20

The company has been more than fair to me.  Anyhow, I love my UC's and now have a pair of Rock Stars to try out in the deep powder.  I noticed that the tops are now a little different in that there seems to be a touch of radius (I don't know the correct terminology) around the tops of the ski, similar to the rounding produced by a router (but very slight).  This may be to prevent  chipping.  After a couple of years my UCs chipped a little, but no worse than other skis. Note: I was on Stockli Laser SCs for much of last year due to the surface of what I skied  being mostly man-made snow.  I don't exactly abuse skis, so perhaps I am not the best judge of what I think is normal wear.  The other thing I noticed is that the bottoms of the new Rock Stars are perfectly flat (I am anal and have a tru-bar).  The UCs were slightly concave (certainly better than most anything off the rack at any ski shop) when received, but the Rock Stars are perfectly flat.  This demonstrates that the skis are spending the proper time curing and are being finished with care.


Edited by quant2325 - 11/2/12 at 1:06pm
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