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front side skis in warmweather; does temperature affect the choice?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Folks, I'm limited to warmer weather skiing now, mostly post February, and wonder if, as a front side skier only, the softer conditions should influence my new ski choice? Specifically, even though I ski groomed trails they are usually far from hard pack come spring, and should I thus look for something a little more all-mountainish or stick with on piste only stuff? Surely big mountain west coast skiers see all kinds of temps on one run so carving skis would be designed to cover hard pack and slush pack?

 

Using Volkl as an example (they sure seem to be talked about a lot here) would a Tigershark 8 be more appropriate than an AC20, or does the 20 gain favour in the warmer stuff?      

 

FWIW, I'm 48, 6'2",  185 lbs, 48, single, extraordinarily handsome. Charming to boot. I have been skiing for 44 years (never a lot though), ski 1 or 2 times for a week each year in NH, maybe 5 days otherwise on small hills here, front side only, ski at a 6 to 7 level. Most of the preceding is correct.

 

Thinking about a 170 or so.

Any thoughts?

 

Thanks,

Blair

post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 

Anyone?

post #3 of 8

personally... 

 

i use FIS GS skis on the piste most of the time...

 

when it gets warmer i will changed to my kung fujas as the gs skies will catch an edge a lot easier in the softer slushier snow...

 

87 degrees compared to 90 degrees... i feel the added width at 100mm help push away the heavier snow...

 

i am off to france in 4 weeks and taking both pairs with me...

post #4 of 8

I don't really care much, but there isn't a heck of a lot of snow where I ski.  If I were skiing in a foot of slush, I would probably decide in favour of my Volant Machete (longer ski and longer turn radius) or P50 F1 over my WC SCs (shorter ski and shorter turn radius).

 

post #5 of 8

Not really for front side skiing that I can think of. Scotty has a good opinion on it. If you were doing more off piste in say, heavy snow, then ya. But front side?

 

Wax.... well that's a 'nother thang.

 

On second thought: I think some of the warmest conditions I have ever skied was in Zermatt a couple of years ago. But one of the things that I recall thinking was that due to the vert I would go from boilerplate up top to transluscent slush at the bottom and everything in between. I remember being thankful that I had a stiffer ski that could handle the wide variety of conditions.

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

So medium stiff, not too quick to turn and longer side cut to prevent edge grabs, 80 mil or more below the boot, and not too short. Sounds like an all mtn ski more than the front side carver I was heading towards. 

 

  Thanks for the thoughts, that's very helpful.

 

Yeah, Ghost, not much snow there. Not much vertical either, as I recall. I spent 7 years in Dundas and Brantford and had to drive south to find some decent hills. Not any better here, I'm afraid. But the seafood's fresher.

post #7 of 8

skiers here use a 95mm ish ski for spring (warm) conditions; ideal for pushing corn around and dealing with the rapidly changing conditions all over the mountain, where deep and sticky  is possible later in the day.  A frontside carver  (65mm to75mm) will hook up, catch, and grab in heavy deep corn and piles of slush. when the corn is still only an inch or so deep, go after it with anything you have. 

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

skiers here use a 95mm ish ski for spring (warm) conditions; ideal for pushing corn around and dealing with the rapidly changing conditions all over the mountain, where deep and sticky  is possible later in the day.  A frontside carver  (65mm to75mm) will hook up, catch, and grab in heavy deep corn and piles of slush. when the corn is still only an inch or so deep, go after it with anything you have. 


+1 for the mid 90 for spring conditions. Tahoe areas have some of the best spring conditions available in NA.

Doesn't matter where I'm in April, (Killington or out west), biggest smiles are always found on a mid 90 ski for the last 5 years. Tried other width but the smiles are just not as big.
 

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