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How to proceed

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

My skiing consist of 4 days each year over spring break in summit county with my family.  I have done this over the past 7 years.  I feel comfortable navigating most any blue run.  i really have no desire to takle any difficult double blacks or anything like due to knee and back issues.  What i would really like to do is become more technically correct in my skiing.  I "think" i am making parallel turns but i do not ski with any experts therefore i really have no idea.  Will intermediate group lessons teach me to be more technically correct or is hiring a private instructor better?  OR, are there other options that would help me to move from just navigating the mountain to truly skiing in a proper form...

post #2 of 11

Take whatever lesson types you can afford this year whenever you can. Enjoy your skiing. Come to ESA next year... 

post #3 of 11

Villagenut,

Are you heading out to Summit County again this year? If so, P.M. me with some dates and I'll hook you up with a couple of great coaches who should be able to help you.

JASP

Keystone Ski and Ride School

Alpine Staff Trainer

post #4 of 11

villagenut, there are a number of exceptional instructors on this site who teach out of a number of the Summit County resorts. A private lesson will undoubtedly get you the greatest opportunity for improvement, but it's also true that many upper-level group lessons are often effectively privates, since very few non-beginners opt for lessons. So, you could give that a try and see how it works for you.

 

Which Summit County resort will you be skiing?

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

We will be at Breck this year skiing March 21-24.  What is the cost for some of these coaches? 

post #6 of 11

PM sent...

post #7 of 11

Nut,

 

In many ways skiing is a lot like golf. Jim Furyk does not have a technically correct swing, yet he still wins money. His swing is complicated and hard to perform, but he gets the job done. If you are getting the job done (having fun), then like Jim Furyk, there's no need to fix anything with lessons.

 

Unless you want more fun. Or more speed. Or steeper slopes. Or more versatility (e.g. moguls, ice, deep powder). Or something else. The trick is figuring out what you want. Taken literally, I'd interpret what you are asking for is an understanding of the fundamentals of the skiing movements. Tiger Woods did not rebuild his swing in one lesson. It's even trickier when you are trying to change versus start from the beginning. Normally in a lesson we will focus on one fundamental and try to make incremental improvements. Whether it's a group or a private, you're going to learn the same things. In a group you're going to get less individual attention. For some people, this is perfect because they need time to process information and get valuable information from watching other people trying to do the same thing. For other people, a private lesson may be better because they can get the lesson tailored to exactly what they need and can learn more and faster when they have the full focus of the instructor and they can choose their instructor. Whether the increased efficiency of a private lesson is worth the difference in time and cost will be a decision unique to everyone. A few people can learn the same stuff from the Internet, books or videos. You may find that a mix of lesson types serves you best or you may find the variety of advice confusing and prefer a single coach.

 

The real secret here is that there is no "technically correct" way to play golf or to ski. But I suspect that there are a few nuggets of wisdom that are about to unlock a whole new level of performance in your skiing. Good luck and enjoy the ride!

 

 

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

Rusty

Thanks for your insight. And i do truly have FUN when i ski.  Living in Arkansas, wife and 2 boys, we are only able to get there once a year but sking is one of my true releases from our norm. We all love it.  with bad knees and back, i just figured that maybe a more technically correct posture and movement would possible be a little less painful.  I guess i was not quite truthful in my original post because my ego would love to be able to say that was able to navigate some blacks and maybe some bowls but im sure my knees and general "out of shape" condition would not allow it.  Maybe the time and money will match up some time.

Thanks again

post #9 of 11

During last week, I got to ski with several Breck Instructors at a PSIA Level II exam. Was impressed with their Teaching and Skiing. When teaching folks who have had knee and back issues, who don't want to step up the terrain, I like to focus on efficiency, and smoothness. A lot can be learned to make skiing more effortless. A close friend in Taos who started skiing over 50 years ago, once complained to me about instructors. "They don't know what to do with me. I used to ski all the double black runs, but now I just want to ski moderate terrain better." Told him he need to be more vocal about his goals and state them before the split. Ran into his group at a ski week a couple weeks ago, and they had built a whole group around him and his wife. They were thrilled with their instructor, and working on carving some really smooth nice turns.

 

Think about your goals and make sure you tell them to whoever splits up folks into classes, or recommends/assigns a private instructor. If cost is an issue, groups are great, especially if you can arrange for the same instructor for multiple days where you can take a lesson in the morning, and ski with the family and practice in the afternoon. If you work with an instructor and its a bad fit. Ask to be moved to another. Often this can be accomodated. Have a great vacation.

 

 

 

post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by villagenut View Post

Rusty

Thanks for your insight. And i do truly have FUN when i ski.  Living in Arkansas, wife and 2 boys, we are only able to get there once a year but sking is one of my true releases from our norm. We all love it.  with bad knees and back, i just figured that maybe a more technically correct posture and movement would possible be a little less painful.  I guess i was not quite truthful in my original post because my ego would love to be able to say that was able to navigate some blacks and maybe some bowls but im sure my knees and general "out of shape" condition would not allow it.  Maybe the time and money will match up some time.

Thanks again

Nut,

 

No worries. "a little less painful" is a lot easier lesson plan than "technically correct". A group lesson is likely to do wonders for you.

post #11 of 11

But, as canoekayak says, be verbally specific when describing your lesson wishes at the lineup.  You may become the center around which a different group is assembled!!

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