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at what temps or conditions do you say "No F'ing Way" - Page 3

post #61 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

When I get frostbite, I quit for the day.  So far, I've never gotten frostbite. 

 

This past Xmas break it was extremely cold up at Stowe.  They had posted a frostbite warning at the Sensation Quad the morning of 12/27.  I rode up doubled over, with my face in my lap to protect myself.  When we got to the top, my two kids said they'd refuse to ski with me unless I went into the base lodge when we got to the bottom and buy myself a ski mask.  It was like a revolt of the Proletariat.  So I did.

 

30 years ago when I skied in cotton jeans and two-sizes-too-small race boots, I used to have to come in because I was worried that my toes might turn black and fall off. Now that I have better fitting boots and warmer pants, I can stay out until  last chair.

post #62 of 89


Off topic, but it was funny to click that link and recognize the skier. Thats PowTron from the TGR forums ripping it up on some ON3P Caylor's.

post #63 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtwhoosh View Post

Not to hijack, but why does the snow lose its glide at certain low temps.  I fancy myself as having a scientific mind, but can't figure that one out.  Its probably obvious, but does anyone know the technical answer?



Don't know if you got your answer, but here is one.  The colder the snow, the sharper the crystals, and harder the crystals.  The hardness of the wax must be just a little harder than the snow so that the crystals don't bite into the base.  Super cold snow requires super hard wax.   Another factor is static electricity.  Graphite is the best here.  Another factor is if you have a Fluoro wax on your skis in cold dry snow, it's going to slow you down.  Base structure.  For super cold powder a smooth base is best, so one with a wet grind will not go as fast in cold pow.  When you have on a hard Hydrocarbon wax, you will find dry pow glide to be very good.  Good luck!

post #64 of 89

Wind is what makes or breaks it for me. -20 doesnt feel too bad until there is a 20mph wind attached to it. Adaptable clothing really lets me ski in any temp I want, personally I wear a  runners shell from north face when I ski. Its provides next to no warmth but is completely windproof and almost completely waterproof, under that I wear the stuff that keeps me warm. Usually an underarmour compression layer, a loose base layer, and then either a light or heavy fleece. If its nostril hair freezing cold out I will grab my heavy jacket instead of the shell, and throw on an extra layer of fleece and possibly another base layer, I will be slighly less comfortable (I hate being in heavy constricting clothing) but I will still be warm. The only thing I dont like about my system at the moment is the hoods. The runners shell hood wont stay on my helmet at anything over low speed, and the vokl jacket I use for very cold days has no hood what so ever. 

 

post #65 of 89


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Dress warm. Cover exposed skin. Wear boot gloves. Duck inside by a fire when you need to. Enjoy!
 



Don't forget to carry a hair dryer so that you have a prayer of getting your boots off at the end of the day....

post #66 of 89

Ok calling all Epic meteorologists.  One thing I've always noticed is that Colorado "cold" doesn't feel that cold.  i.e., I was walking around Silverthorne the other week when it was -6F in a light sweater and thin fleece glove liners and felt perfectly comfortable.  If it's -6F here in New England, I dread getting out of the car as it hurts to breathe.  Why is that -- i.e., why does Western cold air feel so much warmer than Eastern cold air?  I've heard it's the amount of moisture in the air, but really -- how much moisture is there in the air when it's below zero Fahrenheit?

post #67 of 89

...because there is also simply less air?   

 

Imagine holding a cold steel plate in your hand and a cold steel plate with 25% of its surface area drilled out in your other hand.   

 

 

 

 

Quote:
I've heard it's the amount of moisture in the air, but really -- how much moisture is there in the air when it's below zero Fahrenheit?

 

In Boston?   Quite likely close to 1 gram per cubic meter:

 

http://www.tis-gdv.de/tis_e/misc/klima.htm

 

Edit: that's like taking a cubic meter of perfectly dry air and adding 3000+ snowflakes, given one snowflake ~10^19 molecules.

post #68 of 89


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

Ok calling all Epic meteorologists.  One thing I've always noticed is that Colorado "cold" doesn't feel that cold.  i.e., I was walking around Silverthorne the other week when it was -6F in a light sweater and thin fleece glove liners and felt perfectly comfortable.  If it's -6F here in New England, I dread getting out of the car as it hurts to breathe.  Why is that -- i.e., why does Western cold air feel so much warmer than Eastern cold air?  I've heard it's the amount of moisture in the air, but really -- how much moisture is there in the air when it's below zero Fahrenheit?


humidity, moisture content of the atmosphere, a primary element of climate. Humidity measurements include absolute humidity, the mass of water vapor per unit volume of natural air; relative humidity (usually meant when the term humidity alone is used), the ratio of the actual water-vapor content of the air to its total capacity at the given temperature; specific humidity, the mass of water vapor per unit mass of natural air; and the mixing ratio, the mass of water vapor per unit mass of dry air. Absolute humidity finds greatest application in ventilation and air-conditioning problems. Humidity is measured by means of a hygrometer. The rate of evaporation decreases as the moisture content of the air increases and approaches saturation. In addition, the saturation point (moisture-holding capacity of the air) increases rapidly as the temperture of the air rises (see dew). Thus cold air, while its moisture content is necessarily quite low (low absolute humidity), may be almost saturated with respect to the maximum amount of water vapor it is capable of holding (high relative humidity). Cold air with high relative humidity “feels” colder than dry air of the same temperature because high humidity in cold weather increases the conduction of heat from the body. Conversely, hot air attended by high relative humidity “feels” warmer than it actually is because of an increased conduction of heat to the body combined with a lessening of the cooling effect afforded by evaporation. On the other hand, a low relative humidity “modifies” the effect of temperature extremes on the human body. Humidity decreases with altitude

 

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2007, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.


 
post #69 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bielz View Post

Wind is what makes or breaks it for me. -20 doesnt feel too bad until there is a 20mph wind attached to it. Adaptable clothing really lets me ski in any temp I want, personally I wear a  runners shell from north face when I ski. Its provides next to no warmth but is completely windproof and almost completely waterproof, under that I wear the stuff that keeps me warm. Usually an underarmour compression layer, a loose base layer, and then either a light or heavy fleece. If its nostril hair freezing cold out I will grab my heavy jacket instead of the shell, and throw on an extra layer of fleece and possibly another base layer, I will be slighly less comfortable (I hate being in heavy constricting clothing) but I will still be warm. The only thing I dont like about my system at the moment is the hoods. The runners shell hood wont stay on my helmet at anything over low speed, and the vokl jacket I use for very cold days has no hood what so ever. 

 

When I'm skiing, unless I'm working on SL turns, there is usually a 40 mph + wind even if there is now wind due to weather; there is wind due to me skiing down the hill.

 

So, this got me thinking... if it's -40 and I'm doing 60 mph, what's the wind chill?eek.gif
 

post #70 of 89


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post


When I'm skiing, unless I'm working on SL turns, there is usually a 40 mph + wind even if there is now wind due to weather; there is wind due to me skiing down the hill.

 

So, this got me thinking... if it's -40 and I'm doing 60 mph, what's the wind chill?eek.gif
 

 

Snowmobile clubs post tables like this all the time:

 

windchill.gif
 

post #71 of 89

Cold weather sometimes psychs me out - both skiing and early/late season windsurfing. But once I get out there and start moving around it's always fine. The only problem I have is with my hands which I got frostbite on decades ago in Yellerstone NP. I have a pair of BD mitts which are like a blast furnace as well as a pair of 5mm neoprene Dakine mitts for windsurfing.

post #72 of 89

-20 degrees without windchill. i have really cheap gloves, think ten dollars. my feet are usually ok, as i have ski socks and boots on, same goes for my chest

underarmour<longsleeve shirt<sweatshirt<jacket

 

its usually the hands that get me.

post #73 of 89

I'm stupid, If your heading out the door I'll follow.

post #74 of 89

What is "cold"?

 

I don't get it. I think it's all in your head. At least, I think I do...or do I think?

 

Whatever. Just use a lighter oil.

 

--PSIMAN!

post #75 of 89


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSIMAN! View Post

What is "cold"?

 

I don't get it. I think it's all in your head. At least, I think I do...or do I think?

 

Whatever. Just use a lighter oil.

 

--PSIMAN!


What is "cold" was the way your girlfriend Ms Plaitnum dumped you for those EpicSki Bears at Breckenridge last weekend!

 

470_843378.jpg

 

Is she a real blond?

 

post #76 of 89

It's not the heat, it's the humidity. 

post #77 of 89
I'm late to the game...

For me, it was -32. This picture was taken at the base of Breckenridge Wednesday morning. I didn't ski. I lived in Duluth, MN for 2 years, and am familiar with the pain of frost bite. I have no desire to re-visit it.

500

 

 

post #78 of 89

You guys are so core!  I've never been in weather that was too cold for me to ski, but the coldest has only been -5 F.  However, I'll say "no f%#*ing way" if it's raining hard like today.  Yuk.

post #79 of 89

No pain, no gain.  I've gotten pretty close to frost bite, but don't think I've technically gotten it ever.  Never said no to skiing, for any reason (weather, mono, walking pneumonia, the list goes on)

post #80 of 89

The worst frostbite/frozen feet I ever experienced was from outdoor pee wee hockey in 2nd grade.  Ever since that I know when it is starting to happen, but it diesn't really hurt until my feet  and fingers start to thaw out again.

 

3652095_std.jpg

post #81 of 89


FIFY

Quote:
Originally Posted by RaceDude View Post

No pain, no LOSS.


The trouble is the pain can come after it's too late, like Crgildart says.  There are plenty of people who have lost much.  Frostbite is just not something to fool around with. 

My solution is a warmer core for warmer fingers and toes.  Too warm and goggles fog up too much though.  Still fine tuning that one.

post #82 of 89

This past Wednesday heading up to SnowMass for a Level II Exam. Any other day, I would have waited a few hours. My only thought was, "This is going to hurt!" Passed nonetheless.

 

 

neg22.jpg

post #83 of 89
Thread Starter 

Congrats!

post #84 of 89
Quote:
Passed nonetheless.

Well done, CanoeKayak!

Nothing can be colder than an exam at 22 below zero! Or, any temperature, really! Way to go.

Best regards,
Bob
post #85 of 89

at what temps or conditions do you say "No F'ing Way" 

 

Easy.  When it is warm enough to golf in a short sleeve shirt, it is time to say "No F'ing Way" and put storage wax on the skis.

post #86 of 89

I try to ski at every possible opportunity.  It seems like there can always be an excuse for avoiding the slopes, whether its temperature, wind, fog, visibility, crowding, etc,etc...I think it's best just to deal with it.  Plus, there are advantages to these different adverse conditions.  When its really windy and cold, for instance, you have less people on the runs, so more room to yourself!

post #87 of 89
Bravo, Alta skier 110! I agree--it's a mental game, in some ways--once you choose to "like" weather of all sorts, it opens up a whole new fascination in skiing, and brings a bunch of great opportunities with it.

Warmest welcome to EpicSki!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #88 of 89

Well Saturday I had quite the opposite.  Temps were supposed to be snowy and 22* instead it was torrentially raining and 40 all day.   Had to ski, but far less than ideal conditions.  Worse than severe cold IMHO.

post #89 of 89

I've skied -54 to 93.

 

My "no f'ing way" conditions:

 

Water Ice.

Zero vis in significant consequences situations.

Any pucker factor of 11.

 

I'm sure there are some I'm forgetting. Of course, there are also "rather not" conditions.

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