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at what temps or conditions do you say "No F'ing Way" - Page 2

post #31 of 89

To look outside and see this it's hard not to get excited about getting on that hill, no matter how f'n cold it is! Colorado is truly God's country!

 

02-02-11 View From Breck Living Room2.JPG

 

Today will be a good one to see whether Hertel's Cold Snap makes a difference mixed in with the Hot Sauce. Regardless, poling and skating generate warmth!  ;-)

post #32 of 89

Today is definitely too cold for me to leave the warm confines of the desk... just watching people skiing down out my window is making me cold.   I was out on New Years Eve in -25, (not counting windchill which we think brought it down to -40ish) and it was agony... snow was too cold to glide even in the fresh stuff and all you could concentrate on was how effing cold you were... I prefer having all 10 toes and 10 fingers firmly attached to my body so yes, today is waaaay too cold for me.

post #33 of 89

Oh and Finn and any others in Steamboat... lifts still on weather hold as of 10:15 are Storm, Sundown, Sunshine, Pony, and Thunderhead.  Bar UE, Southpeak, and Elkhead are running, but that means slow laps up top.

post #34 of 89

When I was in college I went skiing with my uncle and his family at Crested Butte.  The temp in Gunnison was something like -50 and it was in the -30's on the mountain.  My uncle said by God he paid for lift tickets and we were going to ski. I remember it wasn't so much that you were cold, it was way beyond that to where you just hurt from the cold.  Really stupid to be out in those conditions (he was a doctor and should have known better) with a real risk of frostbite or worse.

post #35 of 89

-30 yesterday at the ski area where I work, got frostbite on the nose from riding up the lift to swap out the liftie at top shack, had my hand covering my face the whole ride. No glide even with the best cold wax I could find in town. TOO DARN COLD!, -10 is fine anything below that is pushing it.

post #36 of 89

Not to hijack, but why does the snow lose its glide at certain low temps.  I fancy myself as having a scientific mind, but can't figure that one out.  Its probably obvious, but does anyone know the technical answer?

post #37 of 89
post #38 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post

Ha!  My wife just opened up the door of our Steamboat hotel room.  The cold fog rolled into our room like a the monster from Lost.

 

She's definitely more core than I am.  Her comment:

 

Damn, I guess I'll put my shoes on before I go out there.

Better there especially today.  Can you imagine if you were trying to drive home today?
 

post #39 of 89

Jackson Hole airport was reporting -24 and 10mph wind for a wind chill of -49.

 

Here's what my car thermometer said near the Snake River this morning on the way to the ski area:

 

IMG_4742.JPG

 

I *did* ski.

 

(But I didn't ski for very long)

post #40 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

earlier this morning we did the 'throw the water into the air" thing. it was so cool!  Instantly freezes



Man I have to remember to try that next time I'm in the bitter cold. icon14.gif

post #41 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtwhoosh View Post

Not to hijack, but why does the snow lose its glide at certain low temps.  I fancy myself as having a scientific mind, but can't figure that one out.  Its probably obvious, but does anyone know the technical answer?


 

 Cold snow is drier...

 

post #42 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by mtwhoosh View Post

Not to hijack, but why does the snow lose its glide at certain low temps.  I fancy myself as having a scientific mind, but can't figure that one out.  Its probably obvious, but does anyone know the technical answer?


 

 Cold snow is drier...

 

And it's not "certain" low temperatures, it's ALL low temperatures.

 

 

 

post #43 of 89

It's never too cold to go skiing.

post #44 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

It's never too cold to go skiing.


 

 That's how I feel. ^^^



Now, if it is raining at the resort, I say no thanks. I can safely say that the coldest I ever felt was when I was skiing and it was raining.

post #45 of 89

Know a old guy in CB that will only ski in 15" or more but that being said he would be out in any weather for 15 or more. I just need soft skiing, frostbite is bad but with the right layers and something to cover my face I am normally reasonably comfy, frozen toes are bad though. 

 

As for what would I say no to, weather that is so bad that it is dangerous.

post #46 of 89
33 degrees below zero at 8:00 this morning in Silverthorne, Colorado--don't know how low the mercury went in the depths of darkness overnight. I'm wearing a thermal undershirt, wool turtleneck, fleece turtleneck, heavy wool sweater, fleece vest, and softshell fleece jacket--beneath my insulated parka, feeling like the 7-Layer Burrito I surely resemble. But it's bright and sunny, and so far at least, the air is still with columns of frozen smoke and steam hanging vertical above every chimney.

Not a single person showed up for ski lessons this morning, so I went out for a few runs with Rachel from the rental shop, who had hoped to jump into a lesson. We may have been the only ones on the mountain, and it was incredible! She wanted to work on "carving," and there couldn't have been a better choice on the firm groomed cold corduroy that was all but abandoned for a change.

You've got to love weather if you really love skiing. If you dress right and prepare mentally for it, you will enjoy experiences that very, very few people on the planet will ever see. The crisp, bright cold today reminded me, ironically, of the pouring rain we had on the last afternoon of the EpicSki Academy in Stowe last December. Again, we were about the only people left on the mountain, and it took on a surreal tone. The snow was awesome, and as long as you didn't mind wringing out your gloves now and then, it was an incredible experience that most people missed.

Of course, I'd once forgotten how tough those New Englanders are. Seven or eight years ago, I led a clinic for Stowe instructors on a morning when it was something like 20 degrees below zero. At the top of the Mansfield Quad, the flag on the Octagon Lodge stood straight out and rigid in the wind. Being from Colorado, I was expecting half of the instructors there to suggest that we go inside for a hot chocolate, but no one said a word. The only inkling I had that anyone else even noticed that it was "chilly" was that when a particularly large gust of wind nearly blew the flag right off its mast, one of the instructors turned his back to it and zipped up his pit zips. Hard to believe, I thought, that I grew up in northern Maine and was once used to skiing and playing hockey outdoors in minus-40 degree temperatures, at night!

Dress warm. Cover exposed skin. Wear boot gloves. Duck inside by a fire when you need to. Enjoy!

As Weems says, "only two kinds of people get cold: poor people, and stupid people." (And my father points out that not all poor people get cold.)

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #47 of 89

 Staying warm hasn't been my problem so much as being able to breathe has. Double digits below zero, maybe -15 and lower, I start coughing and can't stop. Breathing more through the nose sort of helps, but even a couple of breaths through the mouth will do me in. It's not a huge problem, those temps are so rare around here... I can skip a day. :-)

post #48 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

 Staying warm hasn't been my problem so much as being able to breathe has. Double digits below zero, maybe -15 and lower, I start coughing and can't stop. Breathing more through the nose sort of helps, but even a couple of breaths through the mouth will do me in. It's not a huge problem, those temps are so rare around here... I can skip a day. :-)


Sounds like you need one of these.. http://www.redferret.net/?p=23863  (Never used one myself).

post #49 of 89

Yeah, I threw in the towel today when I saw it was supposed to be a HIGH of -2 with windchill somewhere in the -20s to -30s. But that's only because tomorrow's supposed to get up to 20, so I made the easy decision that if I'm going to play hooky this week, I may as well wait the extra day. Can't imagine there will be much of a crowd tearing into the powder, so tom should be just as good as today, just a little warmer.

post #50 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

 Staying warm hasn't been my problem so much as being able to breathe has. Double digits below zero, maybe -15 and lower, I start coughing and can't stop. Breathing more through the nose sort of helps, but even a couple of breaths through the mouth will do me in. It's not a huge problem, those temps are so rare around here... I can skip a day. :-)



Ever try the Talus Cold Avenger? I have one, but it rarely gets cold enough for me to use it. It's got a medical-grade-plastic ventilator that's supposed to prevent breathing problems in cold weather. It might be worth a look.

post #51 of 89

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

33 degrees below zero at 8:00 this morning in Silverthorne, Colorado--don't know how low the mercury went in the depths of darkness overnight. I'm wearing a thermal undershirt, wool turtleneck, fleece turtleneck, heavy wool sweater, fleece vest, and softshell fleece jacket--beneath my insulated parka, feeling like the 7-Layer Burrito I surely resemble. But it's bright and sunny, and so far at least, the air is still with columns of frozen smoke and steam hanging vertical above every chimney.

Not a single person showed up for ski lessons this morning, so I went out for a few runs with Rachel from the rental shop, who had hoped to jump into a lesson. We may have been the only ones on the mountain, and it was incredible! She wanted to work on "carving," and there couldn't have been a better choice on the firm groomed cold corduroy that was all but abandoned for a change.

You've got to love weather if you really love skiing. If you dress right and prepare mentally for it, you will enjoy experiences that very, very few people on the planet will ever see. The crisp, bright cold today reminded me, ironically, of the pouring rain we had on the last afternoon of the EpicSki Academy in Stowe last December. Again, we were about the only people left on the mountain, and it took on a surreal tone. The snow was awesome, and as long as you didn't mind wringing out your gloves now and then, it was an incredible experience that most people missed.

Of course, I'd once forgotten how tough those New Englanders are. Seven or eight years ago, I led a clinic for Stowe instructors on a morning when it was something like 20 degrees below zero. At the top of the Mansfield Quad, the flag on the Octagon Lodge stood straight out and rigid in the wind. Being from Colorado, I was expecting half of the instructors there to suggest that we go inside for a hot chocolate, but no one said a word. The only inkling I had that anyone else even noticed that it was "chilly" was that when a particularly large gust of wind nearly blew the flag right off its mast, one of the instructors turned his back to it and zipped up his pit zips. Hard to believe, I thought, that I grew up in northern Maine and was once used to skiing and playing hockey outdoors in minus-40 degree temperatures, at night!

Dress warm. Cover exposed skin. Wear boot gloves. Duck inside by a fire when you need to. Enjoy!

As Weems says, "only two kinds of people get cold: poor people, and stupid people." (And my father points out that not all poor people get cold.)

Best regards,
Bob Barnes

Bummer that I missed you today, Bob!

 

I was assigned to the Incline group for the OHG this morning, but when only 4 (total!) OHG guests showed up and none were skiing Incline, I elected to head home. I led a group of upper Decline members yesterday, and we skied through until 1:30 or so when they were all showing signs of temperature-induced fatigue. I admit that I had some trepidation about taking a group out today, but would have if they had been there...

 

I remember in the mid-80s skiing at Stowe one clear, bright winter's day when it was -20F or so. Back in those days I skied with goggles and no hat. Did it that day, too. The wooly mop that I call hair kept me plenty warm as I recall... but the rest of the ski club thought I was insane. I rather like it that way... roflmao.gif

post #52 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

 Staying warm hasn't been my problem so much as being able to breathe has. Double digits below zero, maybe -15 and lower, I start coughing and can't stop. Breathing more through the nose sort of helps, but even a couple of breaths through the mouth will do me in. It's not a huge problem, those temps are so rare around here... I can skip a day. :-)



Ever try the Talus Cold Avenger? I have one, but it rarely gets cold enough for me to use it. It's got a medical-grade-plastic ventilator that's supposed to prevent breathing problems in cold weather. It might be worth a look.



Maybe if I lived in New England or north into Canada, or my job was on the mountain, but it really isn't a problem here. Like I said, I can skip a day.

post #53 of 89

You know when its cold when you cant open the car doors and your car is frozen to the ground and when you put it in drive it wont move no matter how much gas you give it.   Take a breath and your nose hairs freeze, and your eye lashes freeze together every time you blink.   That was my experience at Killington several years ago.   They say it was -50 with the windchill.   That same day the rubber frame of my Uvex goggles shattered like glass on my face.   But in spite of all that I skied; even after blood was trickling down my face from the shattered goggles.  That was probably the most cold I have ever felt in my life.

post #54 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

To look outside and see this it's hard not to get excited about getting on that hill, no matter how f'n cold it is! Colorado is truly God's country!

 

02-02-11 View From Breck Living Room2.JPG

 

Today will be a good one to see whether Hertel's Cold Snap makes a difference mixed in with the Hot Sauce. Regardless, poling and skating generate warmth!  ;-)



Maybe I'm jaded.......  but nothing about that pic makes want to go outside skiing if the temp is below 0F.....

 

 

Now if I looked out and saw this I would probably head out regardless of temp...

Car_shroom.jpeg

post #55 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

 Staying warm hasn't been my problem so much as being able to breathe has. Double digits below zero, maybe -15 and lower, I start coughing and can't stop. Breathing more through the nose sort of helps, but even a couple of breaths through the mouth will do me in. It's not a huge problem, those temps are so rare around here... I can skip a day. :-)



Ever try the Talus Cold Avenger? I have one, but it rarely gets cold enough for me to use it. It's got a medical-grade-plastic ventilator that's supposed to prevent breathing problems in cold weather. It might be worth a look.



Maybe if I lived in New England or north into Canada, or my job was on the mountain, but it really isn't a problem here. Like I said, I can skip a day.


Amen Sister!!!

post #56 of 89


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

To look outside and see this it's hard not to get excited about getting on that hill, no matter how f'n cold it is! Colorado is truly God's country!

 

02-02-11 View From Breck Living Room2.JPG

 

Today will be a good one to see whether Hertel's Cold Snap makes a difference mixed in with the Hot Sauce. Regardless, poling and skating generate warmth!  ;-)


How did it go?    I totally forgot to leave you some LF4.   redface.gif    

 

Any talcum-powder use-your-edges-only snow or was it crust city?

post #57 of 89

When I get frostbite, I quit for the day.  So far, I've never gotten frostbite. 

 

This past Xmas break it was extremely cold up at Stowe.  They had posted a frostbite warning at the Sensation Quad the morning of 12/27.  I rode up doubled over, with my face in my lap to protect myself.  When we got to the top, my two kids said they'd refuse to ski with me unless I went into the base lodge when we got to the bottom and buy myself a ski mask.  It was like a revolt of the Proletariat.  So I did.

post #58 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post
Maybe I'm jaded.......  but nothing about that pic makes want to go outside skiing if the temp is below 0F.....

 

Yes, you are jaded/spoiled. And if I live(d) close to these Colorado mountains long enough I might be too, but for now it's like a starving man at an all-you-can-eat buffet - I just can't get enough, but thanks to the Epic Pass I can try!

 

Now if I looked out and saw this I would probably head out regardless of temp...

 

Was that Kid, or Play?  ;-)

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by comprex View Post

 

Today will be a good one to see whether Hertel's Cold Snap makes a difference mixed in with the Hot Sauce. Regardless, poling and skating generate warmth!  ;-)


How did it go?    I totally forgot to leave you some LF4.   redface.gif    

 

Any talcum-powder use-your-edges-only snow or was it crust city?

 

I was only able to go 5 runs on Peak 9 before the cold got me. Another day of groomed-to-Hell, squeaky, dry snow; a little crusty in some places. I knew I wouldn't last that long so for a grin/change I took the old Axis X's out and they felt remarkably good! The hot sauce/cold snap combo did seem to help, but things were definitely still on the slow side.

post #59 of 89

-25 C with a windchill is usually enough to make me think twice. When it gets to about -30 C resorts start to shut down or restrict the number of lifts operating.

 

I think it's a combination of factors, though. There were a bunch of us down at Solitude yesterday and I noticed the locals went in pretty early when the wind picked up around 2:45 even though the temp was probably only about -15 C. (To be fair, so did we, but it was the fourth day in a row for most of the club (16th for me) and most of them were thinking of getting back to Calgary to rest up.  I think it's a combination of air temp, wind, and snow conditions that determine when you reach your breaking point. Having said that, I have only pulled the plug once due to cold (-28 C at Lake Louise--but I drove to Kicking Horse which was 10 degrees warmer and skied the day there). I've pulled the plug three times due to rain.

post #60 of 89

Last Monday I taught 5 hours of private lessons at -30. No wind and the sun was out, it wasn't that bad.

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