New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Please MA this - Page 2

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

 

 

Flexion/extension turns (flex down/forwards gradually to the apex into a crouch, then flex up through the middle of the transition.  You should be standing up completely at transition.  Try to flex in the direction of the new turn, rather than straight up/down)

Great drills Matthias, but could you explain the purpose of this drill?


It's a really easy task to focus on getting some movement in the joints in the lower body.  Ideally you can try to get some directional movement as well, by flexing and extending in the direction of the new turn.

 

Quote:
The word "flex" is being used for both flexing and extending. A bit confusing IMO.

 

Picky, picky... rolleyes.gif

post #32 of 38

Nice video which shows your turns well and what you are doing well and what needs work on.

I disagree with other posters who want to see your skiing in real time. Slower motion shows truths.

 

Big improvement from your first video to the most recent.

I am not an instructor. And have learnt and improved most in recent years from the PMTS

progression. I found the terminology and lack of systematic progression from other types of instruction

kept me from having a clear focus and from improving. Just to be open and transparent.

 

1. Good initial tipping.

2. Good separation of upper/lower body utilizing both counter balancing and counter acting.

3. You stand UP at transition. This is slowing your ability to transition effectively and I am guessing you feel "rushed" in the transition stage to get to the new edges. This leads to an A frame or stemming.

 

Work on:

Pulling back the inside everted (tipping to little toe edge) THROUGHOUT the turn . You cannot have too much pull back. THis will minimize the inside ski from being IN FRONT of the longer outside leg.

 

Lighten the outside ski, (yes, the long one which has extended naturally) by flexing, lifting lightly or removing weight from it, BEFORE you try to change your direction!!! Then, and only then, tip that lightened, flexed leg to it's little toe edge. 

 

Continue to practice on easier slopes each day.

You clearly want to make the transition from intermediate to advanced skier with speed control on a variety of terrains.

Good luck.

 

LCS

post #33 of 38

I really like the idea of maintaining discipline with the inside half but must strongly disagree with the advice to pull back the inside foot as much as you can. The result of that is a telemark like turn and the hips and torso rotoring into the turn. In it's lesser form it still produces a square to the skis stance since most skiers also pull back the inside hip to make room under the body for the inside leg. That additional angular momentum then needs to be dealt with before the next turn can begin. Would you counter rotate at the sacro-lumbar region of the back to produce the countered stance. Why not just keep the inside hip up and ahead while not letting the foot move so far ahead in the first place. Why treat the symptom (excessive foot lead) when the root cause is up in the hips?

post #34 of 38
Thread Starter 

The more I think more I'm going into the idea for some private lessons rolleyes.gif

post #35 of 38

As far as the up and over transition, Well Pete can do that quite well. What he doesn't do is extend his legs and reach out laterally with the feet during the middle of the turn. Nor does he flex as the feet turn and come back under his body during the last half of the turn. That's why his body vaults over to the new turn. Adding the hip opening up only exacerbates this vaulting and makes it difficult to work the ski until the skis reconnect in the control phase. I've already covered the effects of breaking at the waist and how that excessively tips the upper body forward and how the hip drop mitigates this forward toppling. The key to the next level is more upper body discipline and more lower body activity.

 

The only other issue here is that the slope and speed don't require the larger than necessary movements of the hips and torso. Even TDK who is a very strong advocate of those moves suggests less angulation and more lower body activity.

 

Pete, the best "drill" I can think of is to go work with a race coach, or high level instructor who can help you learn more about reaching slalom turns. We here at Epic can certainly help you understand why that vaulting, the relative lack of movement in the legs, and the excessive angulation inhibit your further development but that alone won't help you change those habits. That's going to take some mileage playing with new movement patterns and accurate feedback from a good coach during that process is the fastest way to change your skiing. That's my best advice Pete, even if it sounds like a commercial.

post #36 of 38


PeteW,

 

My comments below are on other posts, not on your skiing.  I practice a heavily race-influenced technique, so I'm not sure my MA would be helpful to you.  If you do go the private lesson route, try to find an instructor whose skiing you admire and wish to emulate and then request him or her.  That's a win-win situation:  you get the lesson you really want and the instructor gets paid a much larger portion of your lesson price for "request" private lessons than for regular private lessons. (At least that's how they get paid in the USA.  Bulgaria may be different.)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

I really like the idea of maintaining discipline with the inside half but must strongly disagree with the advice to pull back the inside foot as much as you can. The result of that is a telemark like turn and the hips and torso rotoring into the turn ... Why treat the symptom (excessive foot lead) when the root cause is up in the hips?


I'm not sure that inside foot lead is a mere symptom.  Inside foot lead usually prevents both tight turning on any slope and speed control on steeper slopes and ice.  And foot pullback via the hamstrings  in no way causes the hips and torso to rotate into the turn.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Reach out laterally more with your feet and skis by opening the knees and plantar flexing the ankles.

 

I haven't heard before that plantar flexing is a good thing in skiing.  In barnes-speak, I've always thought of it as a defensive, non-go-there move -- the body's mistaken way of trying to put on the brakes that backfires by putting one in the backseat.  Whoops!

 

Do any other instructors out there advocate plantar flexing as a regular part of skiing?  How does it help your students?   (i.e. what am I missing?)

post #37 of 38

 

Quote:
I'm not sure that inside foot lead is a mere symptom.  Inside foot lead usually prevents both tight turning on any slope and speed control on steeper slopes and ice.  

 

Hard to tell without seeing more video or an in-person view, definitely.  I suspect that the foot leading is more of an effect here, from trying to advance his inside half while sitting back.

 

Quote:
And foot pullback via the hamstrings  in no way causes the hips and torso to rotate into the turn.

 

That's the kicker.  If he tries to pull his foot back without flexing his ankle, it's not going to fix anything -- he'll just move his whole inside half back and go further in the backseat.

 

But some people respond better to thinking 'pull/hold the foot back' rather than 'push the hip forward' or 'flex the ankle'.  The key here is you have to change the relationship between the foot and the hip.

 

Quote:
I haven't heard before that plantar flexing is a good thing in skiing.

 

There are definitely times when you want to open your ankle -- like going over the top of a mogul, to help keep the ski tips in contact with the snow.  Any time you want to extend instead of flex, you really want all your joints working together.

 

I like letting the skis run out more to the side to start the turn, but you don't want to let them get way in front of you.  In a more retraction-based turn, your legs are getting longer through the first half of the turn -- so your ankle would also open up somewhat.  But you have to be careful not to push your feet way out in front of your hips, which trying to open up your ankle could do.

post #38 of 38

Hi SE,

The advice to not pull back the inside foot as much as possible needs to be seen in the context of overdoing it and creating a telemark like stance which creates outside ski lead and drives the inside hip aft along with the entire inside half of the body. Same hold true for skiers who instead of raising the inside hip up and forward (to create room for the leg and foot to remain under the hip as much as possible), mistakenly drop the inside hip aft and down. Allowing the hip to drop aft means the foot would need to chase it further aft just to get beneath it. The net result of that error is again an internally rotating pelvis. I'm sure you would agree that both of these examples include the inside hip moving defensively away from the new turn, instead of offensively toward it. That's why IMO it's so important to mention the hip needs to remain remain over the foot as much as the foot needing to remain under the hip. Need more clearance? Raise the hip, abduct the knee and pull the heel to the glute. Can we do that with the hamstrings alone? Nope the entire leg is articulating to make that movement occur.

 

As far as plantar flexion, extend the knee and hip while locking the ankle in a static position. Do you recognize this move? It's the classic heel thrust we associate with tail washing turns from an aft stance. We can mitigate some of this by opening the ankles but the boots severely restrict the RoM of the ankles. So at best we can apply a little more pressure to the fore body of the skis before the tibia runs into the spine of the boot. So to be clear here, All I'm suggesting is maintaining tip contact with the snow as the feet move laterally away from the body but I am not suggesting the body is motionless, it's still moving towards the apex of the new turn, so no aft levered stance occurs. BTW, Barnes has been playing with this move for several years now and as one of his staff trainers I spent more than a little time developing teaching progressions that included plantar flexion in this way. I think you're mistaking it for the much larger levering aft moves that feature a combination of a huge amount of ankle flexion and opening the hips so the upper torso moves aft. That is totally defensive and certainly not what I was suggesting. Or said another way ankle movements have a very profound influence on fore aft balance and like you, I don't subscribe to opening the ankles to the point that the body levers aft and moves away from the new turn.

 

In Pete's case his body is already moving forward and the excessive bending at the waist accelerates the shoulders even more. It's being used as an absorption move as much as a movement to facilitate the excessive hip angulation but it's being done in excess so it's disrupting his overall balance. So as he breaks at the waist he drops the hips aft to maintain balance and prevent falling forward. As an absorbing movement it also suggests the rest of the joints of the leg are not doing enough flexing to maintain more upper body discipline. It's also worth noting that the inside knee adducting is quite common from the hips aft stance. Which is why the a frame occurs IMO. Get him into a more balanced stance and it's much easier to abduct the inside knee and keep the hips and feet in reasonably contemporaneous alignment.


Edited by justanotherskipro - 2/2/11 at 4:00pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching