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Do any of you use protective body armor gear? - Page 2

post #31 of 39

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post #32 of 39

Hey Jacques,

You gotta admit you were more atheletically capable 30 years ago.  What a drag it is getting old.   I may not be as strong as I was 30 years ago, but I'm still strong enough.  It's the reflexes that have slowed down the most.  On the other hand I can usually predict what's going to happen next (as long as I look where I'm going), so I can compensate with anticipation.

 

I wouldn't wear armour if it restricted my movements, but if not, then why not?  Back in the good old days when men were men and the women liked it that way we competed in full-contact karate contests wearing kendo body protectors.  The body shield restricted movement, but I was certainly glad to wear it, just the same.

 

As to trying to improve, well, your going to do that anyway.  Wearing protective equipment and improving your skills are not mutually exclusive. Just because your car has a seat belt or an air bag, doesn't mean you can't spend a day at the track.

post #33 of 39
Thread Starter 

Oh now I see what I need!   

 

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post #34 of 39
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Hey Jacques,

You gotta admit you were more atheletically capable 30 years ago.  What a drag it is getting old.   I may not be as strong as I was 30 years ago, but I'm still strong enough.  It's the reflexes that have slowed down the most.  On the other hand I can usually predict what's going to happen next (as long as I look where I'm going), so I can compensate with anticipation.

 

I wouldn't wear armour if it restricted my movements, but if not, then why not?  Back in the good old days when men were men and the women liked it that way we competed in full-contact karate contests wearing kendo body protectors.  The body shield restricted movement, but I was certainly glad to wear it, just the same.

 

As to trying to improve, well, your going to do that anyway.  Wearing protective equipment and improving your skills are not mutually exclusive. Just because your car has a seat belt or an air bag, doesn't mean you can't spend a day at the track.



 Yes!  I've used the jacket twice now.  I'm still really stiff, but it feels fine, and I can move no problem.  Look at me....don't I look like a little kid?   I come in at about 127 lbs.  I'm in good shape for someone who has partied his ass off since 10 yrs old!  That's 40 yrs. of abuse!

 

As for the car....well I Autocross too.  I was born, and raised on a family farm,  I was getting sideways with 400 hp. when I was 8 yrs old!

That's why ice, and snow came to me easy.  All those times on slick mud!   Be good!

 

Oh yea, my wife holds black belts in seven different martial arts.  I have held boards for more than 800 children to break.  It's harder than holding for an adult!

post #35 of 39

I stumbled onto this thread a little late but since my "armor" solution seems to be a bit different from others I figured I would chime in.  A few years back, when some buddies pushed me to leave my skis behind and try snowboarding, was when I first considered armoring up.  In response to the "First time boarding?  Dude you gonna fall on you butt a lot!!" comments I decide to wear my ice hockey padded girdle under my snow pants and it was the best decision of my life.  Plenty of falls, no pain later.  Now I recommend that any of my hockey buddies bring along their padded pants or girdle when trying snowboarding for the first time.

 

I have since migrated back to skiing but have taken some of my ice hockey gear with me.  I wear a ShockDoctor ShockSkin Vest and Impact Shorts.  It is basically padded underwear. While it isn't true armor it will help lessen the occasional knock to the ribs or fall on the butt/tailbone.  It isn't hot, restrictive, or noticeable just a soft layer of padding tucked between you and your jacket/pants. I find it to be a good compromise between wearing nothing and hitting the mountain in a restrictive hard plastic "tank suit".

 

On last note about training, technique, etc..  I'll agree with the posters that comment that improved technique and balance is the first step in not busting your body up at whatever level you ski/board but conditions are unpredictable and everybody falls (especially if you are pushing yourself to the next level).  A little padding, as long as it's not restrictive, is a good idea and cheap insurance.  

post #36 of 39

Or just straight up wrist protectors your gloves will fit over. http://www.allsportprotection.com/How_to_Choose_Mountain_Bike_Wrist_Braces_s/692.htm

post #37 of 39

Body armor has its place, for sure.  I don't wear any now, but mostly because I haven't found something that fits me well and doesn't interfere with movement that keeps me from falling in the first place.  I am considering some of the d3o stuff, but my primary concern is penetrating injuries (i.e. a tree branch), so that doesn't really work.

 

All the lessons, balance and core strengthening work in the world won't protect you from the out-of-control football player on vacation who barrels into you from behind.  My mom took a hit from behind by a 275lb guy out of control.  Ended up with cables in her back.  A few years ago, the same thing happened to her (SLIGHTLY smaller guy), different trail, different resort, but this time she was wearing a back protector.  She was sore for a while, but no major damage. Sure sure, you can make all the arguments you want about the pros and cons, but the reality is that bad things sometimes happen, armor can help prevent injuries, and each of us will make our own decision about risks and trade-offs.

 

So yes, Jacques, people wear it rec skiing.  But whether or not they do shouldn't affect any one person's decision.  If you want the protection, wear it.  If not, don't.  My dad wears two different upper body protectors together (a d3o under layer and a hard plate shoulder/chest/back protector) as well as hip pads.  He had to size up his outer layers, and gets some sideways looks, but he skis better because he is less tense and uptight about getting hurt.  That doesn't mean he takes more chances, he just skis more relaxed, which is one of the best ways to keep from getting hurt.  If wearing armor helps you relax about getting hurt, then it has already served an important protective purpose.

 

My $0.02

post #38 of 39

Many of the younger kids that go big wear it on significant days. The biggest danger is landing on a rock, and it could offer some protection there.

post #39 of 39

Jacques,

 

With you on the gear. I took an intensive season-long advanced lessons, and at a certain point, someone can improve "form", but good form alone is not going to keep anyone safe, PSIA or not. Stuff just happens and all of the best skiing style points in the world with the best form is not going to keep the unanticipated from happening resulting in - a) Greater injury with body armor or b) Less to no injury without body armor. To your agreement in response to other posts, "training" and "lessons" only go so far, and are no replacement for protective gear. Driver's Ed programs do not replace air bags and seat belts. 

 

Those folks need to understand that PSIA-anything is not going to get you down Corbett's. But body armor will protect anyone, at any ski level. Training only works up to the advanced level. Once anyone skis beyond advanced and takes on extreme conditions, slope, angles, then form points are meaningless. Protection is everything.

 

I understand why some of those folks made the comments, but they fail to understand that the best plan for aggressive skiing is to have BOTH - it does not have to be either-or. Assuming that you have training covered already, then the next logical step is protective gear. No one needs to beat a dead-horse with training. 

 

To back you up, I did the whole lessons thing, and the knee-jerk reaction from some here is the idealistic idea that more lessons result in less chance of bad crashes. That 'can' be true, but only to a point - and is sounds like both you and I are beyond that point. Beyond level 8 and level 9 skiing, style points and skiing "properly" do not get anyone anything on a 60 degree angle slope - in these situations, it is about just getting down the mountain, regardless of whether you ski orthodox in proper form, or like a wildman.

 

Let me know what you find out. I want to get suited up too, without spending a fortunate, but to have my bases covered.  

 

Sincerely,

Mark

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