or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New DPS Spoon 150 Ski: Radical 4-cleat Design
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New DPS Spoon 150 Ski: Radical 4-cleat Design - Page 8

post #211 of 226
I'm on the "buy" list, yet have yet to hear a thing......
post #212 of 226

1000x1000px-LL-0e9f2f7a_dps4.jpg

 

Just take a pair of metal sandwich SL skis in to some rock hard, refrozen, trenched out bumps.  You can quickly have a pair of skis that look very similar to thoseroflmao.gif

post #213 of 226

I didn't read the whole thread but I did watch the video. The part where he slides sideways reminded me of intermediate snowboarders who side slip on steep slopes, but the "spoon skier" side slipping at high speed looks like it could be fun. Except I don't like to ski powder at high speed unless I've got 5 or 6k vertical to burn and I usually don't, so I like to slow down and crank'em in the pow.

 

Kudos to DPS for pushing the envelope and hey, a detuned version could show up soon at a heli ski operation near you.

post #214 of 226
"Rationalization is the Best Defense Mechanism"

Poor bastard needs to rationalize why he was got going to own a pair.
Never was going to own a pair of course probably because he doesn't have or wants to part with it.
So now, when he is sitting there on the quadlooking down at his Kneissel White Star 215 and guy down the bench has a pair hanging of his feet and everyone wants a report....he need only question: HOW DO YOU STONE GRIND THEM?

By the way...don't forget to roll up your windows.
post #215 of 226

I'm confused. Is it the Indian or the Arrow?

post #216 of 226

It's the cowboy and the gun.

post #217 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steelheader View Post

"Rationalization is the Best Defense Mechanism"
Poor bastard needs to rationalize why he was got going to own a pair.
Never was going to own a pair of course probably because he doesn't have or wants to part with it.
So now, when he is sitting there on the quadlooking down at his Kneissel White Star 215 and guy down the bench has a pair hanging of his feet and everyone wants a report....he need only question: HOW DO YOU STONE GRIND THEM?
By the way...don't forget to roll up your windows.


what?

post #218 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


what?

dont' worry.....  he's not their target customer.....

post #219 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 


 

Just take a pair of metal sandwich SL skis in to some rock hard, refrozen, trenched out bumps.  You can quickly have a pair of skis that look very similar to thoseroflmao.gif

 

 

This comment has gotten me thinking about why we don't already, naturally get "cleat" type bends in metal sandwich skis.

 

Which made me think that the one thing lacking in ^that^ pic  is an obvious anti-twist (anti-torsion) structure, beyond the first cleat that is.

 

Which made me think that cleats can be the obvious tie-in point for Anton Glider-type longitudinal flex controls as well as double-deck type structures.  

post #220 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

 

This comment has gotten me thinking about why we don't already, naturally get "cleat" type bends in metal sandwich skis.

 

Which made me think that the one thing lacking in ^that^ pic  is an obvious anti-twist (anti-torsion) structure, beyond the first cleat that is.

 

Which made me think that cleats can be the obvious tie-in point for Anton Glider-type longitudinal flex controls as well as double-deck type structures.  


It's not meant to be skied in situations where there should be a a ton of torsional strain on the ski, in any case carbon fiber provides plenty of rigidity.

post #221 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


It's not meant to be skied in situations where there should be a a ton of torsional strain on the ski, in any case carbon fiber provides plenty of rigidity.

 

We're past talking about the current design.     The issue at hand is cleats on other designs.

 

The material is irrelevant if the shape isn't correct.

post #222 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

We're past talking about the current design.     The issue at hand is cleats on other designs.

 

The material is irrelevant if the shape isn't correct.


Well the only kind of ski you would want a cleat design on is a ski like the spoon, so the discussion is irrelevant.

post #223 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


Well the only kind of ski you would want a cleat design on is a ski like the spoon, so the discussion is irrelevant.

 

Just like you'd only ever want rocker on powder skis?  While I don't necessarily disagree with you, sometimes some pretty interesting things come out of seemingly pointless discussions and ideas.

post #224 of 226

Hey all, I have received countless pm’s, emails, etc over the last two weeks regarding where the Spoon project sits, and I want to fill in those curious. Long story short, the prototype Spoon v.3 was tested extensively this past spring, and now Spoon v.4 is exiting the prototyping stage and entering production.

 

I have attached a few photos of the Spoon v.3 from last spring, to show where the ski design is headed. It features a few departures from the original v.1 and v.2 designs. These changes tune the soft snow performance and make for a more capable firm snow ski.  

 

Stephan spent an entire 3-week AK trip skiing Spoon v.3 in March. During that time he experienced a wide range of conditions, from wind-board to epic all time powder. I also spent some quality time on Spoon v.3, and skied everything from soft steep pow, to 2” of mank, and even got the pleasure to test it on top of rain crust.   

 

The changes illustrated in v.3 were done based on our learning from the v.1 and v.2 prototype skis. These initial prototypes illuminated what traits we were after, and WHERE these traits should be present in the turn shape.

 

The idea we’ve been chasing from the start was a ski that found the perfect balance between 'slide' and 'rail'. In other words, the skier should be able to feather the ski into long, planing fall line slides; then, at will, stand on the tail, accelerate across the fall line, and experience a tight driving turn. This opens a new level of creativity and intuitive interaction with terrain that was previously closed to a skier.  

 

Throughout these three prototype stages, the convexity of the spooned shovel became increasingly deeper and more pronounced to promote the slippery feeling at the beginning of the turn that lets the skier easily dictate the eventual turn shape. At the same time, the cleats underfoot became progressively smaller to introduce a small amount of rail into the mid-section of the turn, this allows the rail to dominate the turn finish.

 

In the rapidly approaching Spoon v.4 production ski, the mid-body cleats disappear in favor of a single radius rocker profile borrowed from 5 years of development on the Lotus 138. This single radius rocker is complemented by a deep bevel to the metal edge through the mid-body. 

 

We made the move for both practical and design-based reasons. The single radius underfoot rocker combined with the increased edge bevel has the same net performance as a mild underfoot cleat, and is an easier solution to manage, from both a manufacturing and maintenance standpoint. With this new design, you can now easily stone grind and apply the correct wax to the Spoon. This enhanced finishing accentuates the ability to plane in powder, engage smooth and clean drifts, and power across the fall line at high edge angle.  

 

The cleat concept allowed us to explore the outer reaches of powder ski feel and tune back accordingly to the exact formula of slide and rail. The goal of the ski was to create a 100 percent dedicated powder surfing tool. This ski is not intended for use inbounds. It is a 150mm waist, rockered, spooned powder ski. There is no claim of versatility. That said, I have been able to make turns on the Spoon v.3 in both good and bad snow. I felt totally in control and confident on horrible rain crust, and the design is certainly safe and effective to turn, control speed, and stop in bad snow conditions.

 

100010001000

post #225 of 226

i just wanted to post an update to this thread, as there have been several questions about the spoon in other threads. 

 

The Spoon ski production model, as described above, is final and came to the market about 2 weeks ago.  

 

the final version of the concept itself proved to be so beneficial to the skis performance, in our estimation, that the entire PURE construction version of the lotus family (lotus 120, lotus 138, spoon, as pictured below from left to right) receives the "spoonage" treatment for fall 2013.  

 

 

 

please feel free to fire away with questions here or via PM.  

post #226 of 226
Thanks for the follow up. It looks like the cleats are gone? Is the spoon-osity of these models less than the early spoon prototypes?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New DPS Spoon 150 Ski: Radical 4-cleat Design