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Skiing and Hockey Skating - What are the correlations? - Page 4

post #91 of 116

Good job, you look improved after a year off.  Skating works!

 

My skiing continues to improve.  My skating on skis is a quantum leap better (big surprise!)

post #92 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlbwtgski View Post
 

Just got back from a week of ski instructor training in Vermont. My coach said she can definitely see an improvement in my skiing due to my skating. I felt very confident on the snow after missing all of last season due to a knee injury. The skating helped both my fitness and my balance.

 

Were you at ProJam?

post #93 of 116

skating on skis, and on skates is pretty close to a 100% correlation in my opinion.  the motion is very similar, both are using the edges in a like manner.

post #94 of 116

Yup, and bringing the foot back in after the stride is always coached in ski skating.

 

Two pole pole plants are a lot easier when you glide on one ski.  I used to do the pole plants on every other stride I think, as my strides were so fast.  Now with the prolonged glide after the stride there's time for the pole plant.

 

I taught skating to a 6 year old girl this morning, first on the flats, than had her try it going down hill (very gentle road/slope.)  This turned her almost magically into a parallel skier for some of her turns.

 

Pushing off is just like extending the outside leg, just more dramatic.  Same motion though.

post #95 of 116

As a hockey player growing up and picking up skiing in my early 20's, this has been a really fun thread to read.

Due to a lot of the techniques and physical/mental attribute already discussed, picking up skiing on groomed runs was pretty easy. Skiing bumps and trees took a while to get used to. But logging lots of mileage has paid off over the 10 years I've been on skis and I am now confident on all parts of the mountain.

One thing I've noticed is that I'm stronger turn left on skis. I think this comes from hockey where I play with a left handed stick. Having the stick on the inside of a left hand turn on my skates allows for more confidence and angulation since it can bear some weight if needed (technically a hockey player does not want to do this but the stick is there if needed in a pinch).

For this reason, if I'm hugging the side of a trail grabbing the last patches of powder, I tend to prefer the right side of the trail where I feel like I can correct a mistake more quickly without ending up in the trees.

post #96 of 116

Inspiration courtesy of my favorite Internet skater...

 

 

"When in doubt, chicken out!"

 

Words to skate/ski/live by!  ;) 

post #97 of 116

fun adventure, but OOOF that is some rough ice

post #98 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Inspiration courtesy of my favorite Internet skater...

 

 

"When in doubt, chicken out!"

 

Words to skate/ski/live by!  ;) 

 

......... I think I see some ankle tipping going on.

post #99 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

......... I think I see some ankle tipping going on.


More importantly, when was the last time you saw a Hespeler???  :dunno

post #100 of 116

"Never let a week go without feeling the hardcore buzz of a flow."

 

Love it!

post #101 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Inspiration courtesy of my favorite Internet skater...

 

 

"When in doubt, chicken out!"

 

Words to skate/ski/live by!  ;) 

Wow, that's impressive. I played pond hockey for the first time in decades around New Years. My elbow is still hurting from falling on ice that was only a little bit rippled. ^ That's insane. I'd feel better if he had a helmet on, notice the shin/kneepads though.

 

Interesting thread. The best initial student I ever had, last year, was a Canadian hockey player. Girl, about 13. It was literally her first afternoon on snow. The parent with her said she'd been "bored to death" this morning in the level 1 class. The snow was spring like, and I ended up taking her from the top of the bottom right to the top of the top, green to steep blue, to the steepest black (flat), to flattish woods, to the half pipe. Don't think I've ever covered so much ground in a 2hr lesson.

 

I knew things would be different when on the chair I looked at her boots and the buckles were near maxed. I asked if her feet hurt and why she had her boots so tight. She answered "I like my skates tight" and no need to loosen them on the lift.

 

I think the biggest thing she could do was control her body actually. It was very impressive. We're on the steep trail and she's actually making turns up the hill. Hunched forward, but she's on 120's, it's the first day, and...she's forward. Most impressive was commitment downhill into the new turn trusting the skis would hold. Probably that's what hockey gave her. We talked about it some. I think in hockey, one gets used to anticipating where the body needs to go to make a turn. Body enters inside the turn well in front of the feet. That is not natural on skis on a pitch, and the single greatest limiter to most people's skiing.

Most beginners overdo the body into the turn - forcing it, with no relation to what the feet are doing.

 

Actually, she had the most problem with hockey stops! Couldn't really do it. But the snow was too soft to practice side slips, and rather then waste time on it, we went making turns since she could stop turning uphill. She was really into skiing, liked to go.  I maybe said one sentence about hand position, and the whole time she had basically perfect hand/arm pole position. Impressive. Oh, yes, all these turns were parallel.

 

Almost gave me a heart attack when I took her to the half pipe (19.5ft walls) We're standing on the edge about 2/3 up, I'm explaining what we're going to do. I just wanted to go across or slightly up, slowly, and do a turn back going almost straight across. I was going to lead.

I haven't even finished speaking when she just drops in. Not just in, but downhill! She rockets down and up the far wall. There, she makes a large gs shaped turn at the top of the wall - picking up enormous speed as she comes down. The center of the pipe was 2-3in mashed potatoes. "Oh god...please fall.." I'm thinking. How will I explain a level 2 blowing up in the half pipe?? "No, really, she was good, she should've been in there..."

She doesn't fall, holds on and hits the icy side of the pipe still headed on her down track. Makes another huge gs turn near the top! At this point she must be doing 30mph. On 120's! The potatoes in the middle are flying out. Thankfully, on the soft side, last turn, she somehow slows down somewhat, then blasts out and makes a long turn to stop.

 

I ski down there when she stops because all I could do the whole time was watch mesmerized and pray she survived, Her eyes are wide with a "holy crap I can't believe I just did that!" look, but also "wow, that was fun".

We're out of time, but to celebrate her accomplishment, I take her to get a waffle. I come back with the waffle, she asks, "Are we going to sit down?". "No", I tell her, "give me your poles, you're going to eat the waffle while we ski". (At this point we had to push the envelope). No problem for her, the beginning was pretty flat and by the time we hit the pitch she was well used to eating and skiing. 

Truly amazing. If Mikaela had not skied a day in her life and showed up at 13, it would be this girl.

post #102 of 116

Pretty sure this was posted earlier in this thread but calls for it again...

 

Chinese Downhill on skates anybody??

 

post #103 of 116

I can sort of skate and I can sort of ski. All my girls figure skated and they picked up skiing in about a half hour. Now they all play hockey... 

 

Figure skating requires an edge transition similar to more traditional skiing. Inside edge >> both edges >> outside edge, and vice versa. Skip the transition and it ain't pretty! Hockey skates are much more forgiving of edge transition, as well as fore-aft transition (they are much more, yes, rockered, and the blades are thinner).

 

Take ice dance lessons if you are a skater and you want to improve your skiing! Forward momentum, balance, angulation, it's all there. 

post #104 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

 

Interesting thread. The best initial student I ever had, last year, was a Canadian hockey player. Girl, about 13. It was literally her first afternoon on snow.

...

I knew things would be different when on the chair I looked at her boots and the buckles were near maxed. I asked if her feet hurt and why she had her boots so tight. She answered "I like my skates tight" and no need to loosen them on the lift.

 

Wow, great story! Must be pretty cool to get a student like that!  Thumbs Up

 

I don't really ice skate, but Iove to inline skate, and whenever I do I start out with the skates loosely buckled. Skate easy for a bit to get some feel - sit down and tighten things up a notch. Repeat that 2 or 3 times over 10 or 15 minutes. When I'm warmed up and I do that final cinch to where the skates are very snug, but not uncomfortable, it's like they become a part of me. The responsiveness is so amazing - such a delicious feeling!

 

I do the same thing when I ski - start loose on the boots and progressively snug things up - and get a similar wonderful feeling. Enhanced when I'm on skinny skis.

 

There is nothing like a tight fit!  ;)

post #105 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

 

I don't really ice skate, but Iove to inline skate, and whenever I do I start out with the skates loosely buckled. Skate easy for a bit to get some feel - sit down and tighten things up a notch. Repeat that 2 or 3 times over 10 or 15 minutes. When I'm warmed up and I do that final cinch to where the skates are very snug, but not uncomfortable, it's like they become a part of me. The responsiveness is so amazing - such a delicious feeling!

 

 

http://www.inlineiceblades.com/
 

post #106 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

 

http://www.inlineiceblades.com/
 


I'd rather put wheels on my hockey skates...

 

post #107 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

http://www.inlineiceblades.com/

 

Love practical stuff like that, and if I ever really got into ice skating would seriously consider it, but even though technically it's "ski season" here in California it's sunny and 70 degrees today, so I'll be rolling outside.  ;-)

post #108 of 116

@jc-ski you ever use non inline roller skates? The ones with wheels like a car.

 

I tried them a few times. First time, went with a bunch of people after work. Wed night at the dance club was roller skate night. Dj and lights and everything. I figured since I ice skated, inlined, and skied, "this will be cake". Maybe take me 10 minutes to get it, 30 to get dialed in.

 

Hah! Totally not. I was shocked, I could not balance right away. I couldn't understand why I was so bad at just standing and barely moving. I had to admit I was a total dork, clinging to the side area.

 

People were just zinging along and I can hardly stand up. It took me a good hour to get comfortable and another to get decent enough. It was fun after that, especially going into the corners and doing a flat slide turn - something you'd die on in rollerblades that aren't trick skates with hard wheels.

 

It was a real eye opener though. How different it is then hockey or inline skates. It took way longer to adapt then I would have thought. It was like starting at square 1 also in the beginning.

post #109 of 116

"quads"

Really?   It was that different for you?

post #110 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

@jc-ski you ever use non inline roller skates? The ones with wheels like a car.

 

Nope. Never roller skated as a kid, and have never been on normal "quads". I did buy a pair of these a while back...

 

But I only got on them once very briefly in a parking lot before I decided to focus on inlines. Sold them on eBay - wish I'd held onto them. Think they'd be fun, and would like to give em another go sometime. They're a little bulky, but still something you could slip into a pack and pop on over regular running/etc shoes.

 

 

post #111 of 116

Clearly fat skates are not required for powder...

 

 

"One person's Shit-Show is another person's Shangri-La."

 

Indeed!   ;) 

post #112 of 116

Very cool.  never saw powder skating before.

post #113 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

@jc-ski you ever use non inline roller skates? The ones with wheels like a car.

 

I tried them a few times. First time, went with a bunch of people after work. Wed night at the dance club was roller skate night. Dj and lights and everything. I figured since I ice skated, inlined, and skied, "this will be cake". Maybe take me 10 minutes to get it, 30 to get dialed in.

 

Hah! Totally not. I was shocked, I could not balance right away. I couldn't understand why I was so bad at just standing and barely moving. I had to admit I was a total dork, clinging to the side area.

 

It was a real eye opener though. How different it is then hockey or inline skates. It took way longer to adapt then I would have thought. It was like starting at square 1 also in the beginning.

(I realize I am coming to this conversation late.) I have been skiing for 40 years, inline skating for about 10 years and figure skating for 1 year. Several years ago we had a work outing to a roller skating rink and I too felt totally out of control on quad skates. I kept wanting to pitch forward, too much forward pressure and weight I guess. The rink also had inline skates and after about 1 hour of struggling with quad skates I switched to inline and was cruising around the rink in no time. I had no problems at all picking up figure skating (at least going forward-backwards was a different story at first).

post #114 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlbwtgski View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

@jc-ski you ever use non inline roller skates? The ones with wheels like a car.

 

I tried them a few times. First time, went with a bunch of people after work. Wed night at the dance club was roller skate night. Dj and lights and everything. I figured since I ice skated, inlined, and skied, "this will be cake". Maybe take me 10 minutes to get it, 30 to get dialed in.

 

Hah! Totally not. I was shocked, I could not balance right away. I couldn't understand why I was so bad at just standing and barely moving. I had to admit I was a total dork, clinging to the side area.

 

It was a real eye opener though. How different it is then hockey or inline skates. It took way longer to adapt then I would have thought. It was like starting at square 1 also in the beginning.

(I realize I am coming to this conversation late.) I have been skiing for 40 years, inline skating for about 10 years and figure skating for 1 year. Several years ago we had a work outing to a roller skating rink and I too felt totally out of control on quad skates. I kept wanting to pitch forward, too much forward pressure and weight I guess. The rink also had inline skates and after about 1 hour of struggling with quad skates I switched to inline and was cruising around the rink in no time. I had no problems at all picking up figure skating (at least going forward-backwards was a different story at first).

 

Check the ramp angle difference between your inlines and the next pair of quads you try. 

post #115 of 116
This can be overcome with some dry land training to develop the proper muscle memory. Do lateral jumps while focusing on a center point, keep your hands out front and elbows close to your body, and be sure to push off and land with equal pressure on each foot/leg.
post #116 of 116
I had a similar experience with a 17 year old young man that played both ice and roller hockey. I explained the similarities and differences, basically that he needed to have a little more forward pressure on skis instead of being perfactly centered as on skates. We were on the learner hill for about 5 minutes, the beginner hill about 10, then spent the rest of the lesson skiing the entire area. He already knew how to ski, he just did not know it.
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