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Ski First Aid kit

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I am going to put together a first aid kit for skiing. Any suggestions for supplies I should put in it?

post #2 of 15

My Grandfather always said to make sure you have enough snake bit medicine in case of snow snakes.  His preferred brand was Canadian Club. 

 

Is this a kit you are going to carry with you or is it for the car? 

 

post #3 of 15

Depends on a variety things. Is this for in-bounds or out of bounds. I don't have a lot of back country experience but for back packing and climbing, I always have band-aides of varying sizes(obviously), some kind of disinfectant, and  some long pieces of cloth that can be used to make splints or a tourniquet. There are a thousand different things you can carry but those items cover most of the stuff I have encountered( thankfully never had to make a splint or tourniquet.) Some kind of tweezers, scissors, ect are probably a good idea.

 

Also do you strictly mean first aid or do you mean emergency kit?

 

If your staying in-bounds I'm not really sure you need to carry a kit 

 

.

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brownie_bear View Post

My Grandfather always said to make sure you have enough snake bit medicine in case of snow snakes.  His preferred brand was Canadian Club. 

 

Is this a kit you are going to carry with you or is it for the car? 

 

I was going to carry it with me.


 

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

Depends on a variety things. Is this for in-bounds or out of bounds. I don't have a lot of back country experience but for back packing and climbing, I always have band-aides of varying sizes(obviously), some kind of disinfectant, and  some long pieces of cloth that can be used to make splints or a tourniquet. There are a thousand different things you can carry but those items cover most of the stuff I have encountered( thankfully never had to make a splint or tourniquet.) Some kind of tweezers, scissors, ect are probably a good idea.

 

Also do you strictly mean first aid or do you mean emergency kit?

 

If your staying in-bounds I'm not really sure you need to carry a kit 

 

.

I mean a emergency kit. I ski in-bounds but mostly in unmarked glades.
 

post #6 of 15

A whistle.

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by spknmike View Post

A whistle.



... and a roll of toilet paper tongue.gif

post #8 of 15

I carry the following at the resort: sun screen, cash, some emergen-C, an energy bar, a spare basket, a bit of cord, a diamond stone and a multi-tool. Duct tape on my poles. Imagine your pole is the take up reel in a cassette tape and reel the tape from the duct tape roll to your pole. Put on a meter or two of tape. You can use this to fix a torn jacket, pants, or skin. This will keep you held together until a proper (if you don't consider duct tape proper) fix is available at the base of the ski area. It will hold a basket on your pole in a pinch in the event your spare basket isn't specific to your pole, too. I have a basket that has been held on by duct tape for about a month. A whistle is a great idea for any time off-piste. The whistle needs to be accessible easily in the event you are stuck upside down in a tree well or caught on a tree.

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by VladL View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by spknmike View Post

A whistle.

... and a roll of toilet paper tongue.gif


or a trail map. (ouch)

post #10 of 15

I suspect the TGR response to this would include a windproof lighter, a different kind of paper, and possibly some other toolsrolleyes.gif..

 

In all seriousness, a small roll of duct tape would serve many purposes.

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregory99mar View Post

I am going to put together a first aid kit for skiing. Any suggestions for supplies I should put in it?


for corn or ice, the same as bicycling, the large dressings for road (ice) rash.

post #12 of 15

Airway, breathing, circulation are the things that need immediate attention.  

 

Take CPR, carry a CPR mask, have something to stanch heavy bleeding. Maybe carry some aspirin (for an MI), some shears (to expose), Snickers(tm) for diabetic emergency.  And be able to call patrol or 911.  

post #13 of 15

what he said ^^^

 

Knowledge is your best friend and the buddy system is your other best friend in that kind of situation. 

post #14 of 15

Take a CPR class and carry a small key change  size CPR mask. 

 

As am EMT-B,  I carry a large plastic zip lock bag with only a few items that do not take a lot of space in my coat pocket.

 

6 band aids, 6 butterfly band aids, 1 6x6 gauze, three 4x4 gauze pads, small roll of tape

 

3 cravats for splinting (triangle cotton cloth) that look like this, which are a lot larger when unrolled.

cravat.jpg

 

nasopharyngeal airway (NPA) that looks like this (used for unconscious patient with difficulty breathing)

Its small and its an important  tool that I have used a number of times to save a life.  It goes in the right nostril.

You need to be trained on how far to insert it. Use lubricant before insertion. 

Note some contradictions on using NPA. 

 

ZZ_0034.jpg

 

The inside of the plastic bag and inside of the gauze wrappers can be used as an occlusive dressing.

 

The duct tape idea on the ski pole is a great idea. 

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

Take a CPR class and carry a small key change  size CPR mask. 

 

As am EMT-B,  I carry a large plastic zip lock bag with only a few items that do not take a lot of space in my coat pocket.

 

6 band aids, 6 butterfly band aids, 1 6x6 gauze, three 4x4 gauze pads, small roll of tape

 

3 cravats for splinting (triangle cotton cloth) that look like this, which are a lot larger when unrolled.

cravat.jpg

 

nasopharyngeal airway (NPA) that looks like this (used for unconscious patient with difficulty breathing)

Its small and its an important  tool that I have used a number of times to save a life.  It goes in the right nostril.

You need to be trained on how far to insert it. Use lubricant before insertion. 

Note some contradictions on using NPA. 

 

ZZ_0034.jpg

 

The inside of the plastic bag and inside of the gauze wrappers can be used as an occlusive dressing.

 

The duct tape idea on the ski pole is a great idea. 

 

A nasal airway can go in either nare.  They can also be used effectively as an oral airway, if necessary.  The main contraindication to nasal insertion would be evidence or suspicion of a basal skull fracture.  

 

O/W, I agree.  I think that a compromised airway due to head trauma, possibly from a collision with a tree, lift tower, or another skier would be a situation that you could respond to with your oropharyngeal airway or nasopharyngeal airway and mask.  A laceration, severe enough that massive blood is possible, is another.  You seem to be equipped for that.  Fractures, ligament tears, etc are urgent, not emergent, and can wait for the ski patrol to arrive.

 

Oh, I like the whistle idea.  These days I assume everyone has a cellphone too.


Edited by ldrjax - 1/29/11 at 4:00pm
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