New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Keep your feet WARM! - Page 3

post #61 of 84

This article discusses one important aspect of skiing having to do with the feet.  I'd add that warm feet are a must for this to work ...  

**Note the title.  (credit goes to Bumpfreaq for finding this one)

 

 

http://www.mountaingazette.com/mountain-notebook/the-joy-of-sliding-why-our-feet-make-skiing-feel-so-sexy/
post #62 of 84

The one thing I found that worked well for me to keep my feet from sweating so much was the solid deodarant that I would normally put on under the arm kept the feet from sweating and staying warm.

post #63 of 84


This thread deserves a bump.  After all, its time to get out our gear, and see what we need to update, improve and eliminate from last year to assure a happy ski season ahead, eh?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Egan View Post

Keep your feet warm!

 

So you have cold feet and it keeps you in the lodge and off the lift, here are a few tips for keeping the digits toasty this winter.

 

  1. Always dry your boots at night and for me that means take the bladders out and dry the shell and the bladders separately.
  2. Keep the boots warm on the way to the mountain and make your way quickly into the base lodge with them when you unload.
  3. Never wear your ski socks to the mountain.  Especially if you have a drive longer than 10 minutes.
  4. Put on a fresh pair of socks in the base lodge
  5. If you have tight fitting ski boots where thin socks to give your toes some room and air in the boots.
  6. Tighten your power strap on the top of the boot
  7. Barely buckle the boots, keep them loose to the top of the lift
  8. First run buckle the upper cuff buckles only
  9. Ski several runs in this manner
  10. Buckle the lower buckles over the course of the morning
  11. Change socks at lunch time and repeat the above
  12.  

Most people ski with their boots over buckled and cut off the circulation to the toes.  Yes boot heaters work and the toe warmers work too but I don’t have room for them in my boots.

feet_and_fire[1].JPG

The most important thing is to start your day with a dry, warm boot and fresh socks and then let the blood get to your feet and by not over buckling your boots the blood will continue to flow to the toes.  And remember, have fun while skiing its proven that fun improves circulation to the extremities! 



 

post #64 of 84

Cold feet aren't so much the problem - I ski with Hotronics and always start with dry, warm boots and socks.  But, I also deal with Morton's neuromas and an incipient (at least) cramp in one arch at times (yes, I have custom orthotics).  Thank you, Dan, for making it "legal" to ski with buckles loose and tighten them by stages, or even leave that crucial one very loose all day!  

And what a great heads up about snow boots being dampness culprits! The boot driers are running in ours now!

post #65 of 84

I'm sitting in the employee lounge at Northstar this morning and am astonished at the conversations I'm hearing among ski pros who live in their ski and/or snowboard boots. 

 

Instructor #1: I wish my boots were dry.  They've been wet for over a week and my feet are freezing.

Instructor #2: I think I'm going to get some rental boots for the day because my boots are sooooo wet.

 

 

  Don't leave your boots in the cold locker.  Take them home and dry them out thoroughly.  If your boots have been wet for more than a day.........well......Duh!

 

 

(That's not getting into the instructors who are having issues with fit)

post #66 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

I'm sitting in the employee lounge at Northstar this morning and am astonished at the conversations I'm hearing among ski pros who live in their ski and/or snowboard boots. 

 

Instructor #1: I wish my boots were dry.  They've been wet for over a week and my feet are freezing.

Instructor #2: I think I'm going to get some rental boots for the day because my boots are sooooo wet.

 

 

  Don't leave your boots in the cold locker.  Take them home and dry them out thoroughly.  If your boots have been wet for more than a day.........well......Duh!

 

 

(That's not getting into the instructors who are having issues with fit)

 

One can only wonder what it takes for ones brain and common sense to kick in sometimes.

post #67 of 84

My boots are filling up with snow. This is not as much a problem when its warm but as soon as the temps drop it becomes a very big problem. I'm figuring it has something to do with hot and cool temps interacting and condense steam turning into snow. A boot glow over the toes helps as does taping the front part of the boot but not entirely.

post #68 of 84

One of our level 4 course conductors (Sandy Gardner) recommends that, instead of taping, skiers pry open the boot, lay down a bead of silicon along the boot where it needs to seal better, and let it dry. (of course this came about when he saw the two year old duct tape, which makes my boots look ghetto.)

post #69 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve06877 View Post
 

Great advice.  the only addition I can add is BOOT GLOVES...  they look a bit funny, but are one of the best investments ($30) I have ever made. They are easily equal to an electronic toe warmer, and they help keep snow out.  One of those simple things that just works so much better than you imagined. 

 

 

Do they really work in -20???  What about tearing and becoming unusable, is this a dealbreaker?

post #70 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpaulski View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve06877 View Post
 

Great advice.  the only addition I can add is BOOT GLOVES... 

 

Do they really work in -20???  What about tearing and becoming unusable, is this a dealbreaker?

I don't know about -20 temps, but I got a pair of these last hear and they are prone to being cut by the edges of the skis.  I found a way to mitigate this, though; put them on loosely.  I had been putting them on snugly and they got cut up, but when I loosened them, they got no more cuts.  I don't use them daily, so I haven't had lots of time to try this out, but I think it's working.

 

I ski most of the time in loose snow, so I'm not anal about having sharp edges. YMMV.

post #71 of 84

so even loosely they keep your feet warmer than without?

post #72 of 84

I am a huge boot glove fan, they work better than anything I have used (other than dry socks and good fitting boots).   BUT - everything has a downside: 1. The strap that goes under the boot can wear and tear easily if you walk in them any distance.  2. They can get filled with snow in a fall and make putting the ski back on  difficult.    Thats it.  Don't walk and don't fall and your feet will stay warm. 

PS - in -18 I used boot gloves and stick-on toe warmers together and it worked - everything else was so cold it didn't matter though. 

post #73 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpaulski View Post
 

so even loosely they keep your feet warmer than without?


Not really loose, just not stretched tight.  I make it so that there is some give, whereas before I attached them so firmly that there was no way for them to slide around instead of being sliced.

post #74 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

This article discusses one important aspect of skiing having to do with the feet.  I'd add that warm feet are a must for this to work ...  

**Note the title.  (credit goes to Bumpfreaq for finding this one)

 

 

http://www.mountaingazette.com/mountain-notebook/the-joy-of-sliding-why-our-feet-make-skiing-feel-so-sexy/

Hey, that was a great read!  Thanks for posting it =)

post #75 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

I'm sitting in the employee lounge at Northstar this morning and am astonished at the conversations I'm hearing among ski pros who live in their ski and/or snowboard boots. 

Instructor #1: I wish my boots were dry.  They've been wet for over a week and my feet are freezing.
Instructor #2: I think I'm going to get some rental boots for the day because my boots are sooooo wet.


  Don't leave your boots in the cold locker.  Take them home and dry them out thoroughly.  If your boots have been wet for more than a day.........well......Duh!


(That's not getting into the instructors who are having issues with fit)

Geeze, all the locker rooms at the Vail resort I work for have boot drier systems on top of the lockers (warmest areas of the locker rooms). My boots are dry and toasty every morning. But we don't have any "employee lounge" at Breck.
post #76 of 84
A more broad based and comprehensive investgation into the cause is what I would suggest.
1) Circulation more than anything controls distal temperature regulation. Boot fit is a large part of that but not the only factor.

2) Other factors like diabetes, thyroid condition, and many other chronic medical conditions are also possible causes.
3) Even the mammilian dive reflex can be a cause and more often than not this is one reason that gets overlooked.
4) fuel and hydration make a huge difference. Eat frequently, drink even more frequently.
5) Dry and clean feet/socks help but what about the liners? Dried sweat make it impossible for them to wick mosture away from the foot effectively.
6) Exposure to cold over time will cause hypothermia, go inside for a bit when it gets really cold.
Edited by justanotherskipro - 12/1/14 at 3:53pm
post #77 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

I'm sitting in the employee lounge at Northstar this morning and am astonished at the conversations I'm hearing among ski pros who live in their ski and/or snowboard boots. 

Instructor #1: I wish my boots were dry.  They've been wet for over a week and my feet are freezing.
Instructor #2: I think I'm going to get some rental boots for the day because my boots are sooooo wet.


  Don't leave your boots in the cold locker.  Take them home and dry them out thoroughly.  If your boots have been wet for more than a day.........well......Duh!


(That's not getting into the instructors who are having issues with fit)

Geeze, all the locker rooms at the Vail resort I work for have boot drier systems on top of the lockers (warmest areas of the locker rooms). My boots are dry and toasty every morning. But we don't have any "employee lounge" at Breck.


I'm sure these folks have a similar set up but not all instructors are smart enough to use the facilities to their potential. 

post #78 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

I'm sitting in the employee lounge at Northstar this morning and am astonished at the conversations I'm hearing among ski pros who live in their ski and/or snowboard boots. 


Instructor #1: I wish my boots were dry.  They've been wet for over a week and my feet are freezing.

Instructor #2: I think I'm going to get some rental boots for the day because my boots are sooooo wet.



  Don't leave your boots in the cold locker.  Take them home and dry them out thoroughly.  If your boots have been wet for more than a day.........well......Duh!



(That's not getting into the instructors who are having issues with fit)


Geeze, all the locker rooms at the Vail resort I work for have boot drier systems on top of the lockers (warmest areas of the locker rooms). My boots are dry and toasty every morning. But we don't have any "employee lounge" at Breck.


I'm sure these folks have a similar set up but not all instructors are smart enough to use the facilities to their potential. 
You mean like get married at the mid mountain lodge??
I don't remember boot dryers at the wedding but i do recall the groom before making it to the ceremony skiing on some trail at Northstar. He was going along at a good clip, hit a stump, did a forward flip half in the snow, then continued on. I think. He may have been briefly winded. I believe I blotted that out though along with the thoughts of "how are we going to explain this?" to all the guests waiting.
I do know it was blowing snow hard sideways at the time so no one heard any screams...I do believe the feet were warm at the time and if not were warm henceforth. The evidence is the socks did their job as there were no cold feet at the wedding shortly after.

We never did find out what type of socks they were.
post #79 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpaulski View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve06877 View Post
 

Great advice.  the only addition I can add is BOOT GLOVES...  they look a bit funny, but are one of the best investments ($30) I have ever made. They are easily equal to an electronic toe warmer, and they help keep snow out.  One of those simple things that just works so much better than you imagined. 

 

Do they really work in -20???  What about tearing and becoming unusable, is this a dealbreaker?

 

Another firm believer in Boot Gloves here.  They were cheap, so I figured why not try them.  I was sold.

 

I think people may be skeptical of their efficacy due to the fact that they look so ridiculously simple and are inexpensive.  But sometimes the simplest solutions work pretty damn well.  That said, they're not a wonder weapon against cold feet; they just help quite a bit.  Boot heaters or toe warmers (if room in your boot) combined with the Gloves work at any temp I've had them in.

 

On the "con" side, they do look dorky, but how many people are checking out your feet anyway.  It makes getting to your two lower buckles all but impossible without taking them off.  As others have said, the strap that goes under your boot to secure them wears out and snaps pretty quickly...like 20-30 days for me, I think.  If you can find a way to reinforce them, do it.  Of course, they're only 30 bucks to replace anyway.

post #80 of 84
I used to swear by boot gloves, until I started wearing more clothes. Only used them one time last year.

Never had a slicing issue and they have to be ten years old at this point. I roll the edge of the toe under on front to give more space for the binding, which also helps keep snow from getting underneath. I don't walk in my boots much, so have never had this wear issue either. The fact that you can't reach all the buckles can be huge in cold weather. I religiously unbuckle my boots for chair rides to maximize my circulation, since my feet can go numb watching TV.
post #81 of 84
Boot gloves also help when the liquid stuff falls from the sky. I am told this by those who partake. When the liquid stuff is coming down it's usually the cheap stuff or the really expensive stuff that works.
One learns these things often on the lift where one often sees so called waterproof/breathable garments wrapped in plastic ponchos and butts swadled in strange foam rubber things.

Alas a solution has arrived in expensive form.

A new $7million butt warmer and rain shield. A six pack bubble chair. Seats heated briefly at the bottom, chairs snuggly stored inside st night. Now i wonder where the drip line is. Mid boot? Might have more use for those boot gloves.
post #82 of 84

Cold temps haven’t been much of an issue lately – at least in the Tahoe area – but with a brief spat of relative cold last weekend I tried boot gloves.  (For me I think condensation vs. leakage is the primary culprit).   Helped a bit in those conditions where boots were actually in and covered with snow (Finally).  That’s the only condition toes would get a bit cold since I’ve been using the Hot Gear bag.  Wondering if anyone has tried putting chemical toe warmers between the glove and the toe area of the shell.   @steve06877, (post #72), is this what you did?  (No way warmers would fit inside the shell and probably wouldn’t work in there anyway without much air). 

post #83 of 84
I used to use boot gloves regularly. But now my process is to store the boots at home with heat sticks in them. Change to car-compatible heat sticks with mittens shoved in the cuffs. Put boots on indoors. Put ANOTHER PAIR of ski pants (shells) over my ski pants while suiting up. Have not needed boot gloves since the spare pants were added. I also unbuckle my boots for each chair ride if it's in the single digits like yesterday. Toes stayed perfectly fine.

But boot gloves worked well for years. I just don't like how they hide the buckles. If someone would invent a version with a Velcro trapdoor, I'd be all about that. Not a seamstress or I'd do it myself. Have considered splits above each buckle, but it appears that might seriously jeopardize the integrity of the glove.
post #84 of 84

I put several layers of duct tape on the straps periodically to keep from wearing thru them while walking.

 

Check for wear frequently and reapply the duct tape as needed and they Boot Gloves can last a long time.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching