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Keep your feet WARM! - Page 2

post #31 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Egan View Post

Thats a great question about the lower buckles, I rarely buckle them tight, they are very often left undone or just snug, I believe in having my toes free to move for many reasons, warmth and control.  When you can curl your toes in your boots you can grib the bottom of your boot soles and pull yourself forward when you need to.  I do buckle em tight now and again but it depends on where and what i am skiing

Well, Dan, if you only spent your time skiing terrain that was a bit more challenging, perhaps you'd buckle your boots more often.

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post #32 of 68

Here's a great thing for drying and heating boots.  DryGuy Circulator.

 

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It can be used with 110/120 volts at home or 12 volts in the car.  This could be the best solution for those of us that use Transpacks.

 

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I currently use a Chinook air blower at night to dry my boots.  I'm picking up a DryGuy to warm up my boots on the way to the lodge.  It only makes sense.

post #33 of 68
  1. Cold air can sometimes seep up from under your boot soles. The best way to prevent this is to ALWAYS keep your boots clicked into your bindings, whether the skis are on your car rack, outside your condo, whatever.
  2. Never, ever, ever take the liners out of your boots. The abrasion against the side of the shells can compromise the liners' warmability.
  3. Layering system: cotton sweat socks (preferably striped in your favorite NFL theme)/heavy wool or fleece socks/plastic sandwich bags to seal in the goodness.
  4. Make sure you put on your sock combo first thing in morning -- even if you've got a long commute to ski -- and then don't mess with a good thing. This will assure that you seal in the warming juices your feet naturally produce.
  5. Buckle 'em up REAL tight!

 

You're good to go.

post #34 of 68



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post

 

Quote:
Ragin', believe it or not, this is often not snow getting into the boots! What can happen is that the moisture from your feet evaporates from the heat in the enclosed space and makes its way outward where it hits the shell. The shell is COLD from the outside temperature, so the moisture condenses, returning to the inside of the boot as liquid. Sometimes, it even freezes if the shell is cold enough. This is one reason that boot gloves can help: they keep the shell warmer and maintain a more consistent temperature gradient between the foot and the shell. You might try that.

 

I have never had snow get into any of my boots, whether my old Langes, my too-big Solomons, or my two very tight-fitting boots, the Technica XTs or the Nordica Aggressor 150s. I'm still in the 150s with a 0-finger fit, and no moisture from outside. I wear boot gloves most days and seldom have a lot of moisture in the boots.

 

FWIW...



Steve, ya might have a very good point here.  Thinking about it for a while, I do have feet that will perspire when totally covered up.  I do use thin wicking socks.  Have used anti perspirants; not that effective.  What seems to be happening is that as I ski snow gets trapped into the grove of the lower seam of the boot.  Snow melts into the boot, feet eventually get moisture, frozen toes later in the day.  Boot gloves might do the trick...thanks Steve.

post #35 of 68

Take your thin sock, turn it inside out, put your hand to the toe of your sock and make a cup, sprinkle a few squirts of baby powder into the formed cup, then turn the sock right side in, put it on your foot, raise your foot high and shake it, this spreads the powder on top and bottom of your foot. If feet are still cold mix some cayenne pepper with the baby powder.

post #36 of 68

In reply to the snow inside the ski boot. I have had luck using a very very small line of silicon along the open seams. I make sure it cures flat (meaning that I use a gloved finger to smear the line) so that it does not pressure on the top of my foot. This worked on some boots I had a few years ago. Seem not be having the issue anymore with newer models.

post #37 of 68

Amazing what little tidbits of helpful info people amass through days of skiing!

post #38 of 68



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer View Post

Take your thin sock, turn it inside out, put your hand to the toe of your sock and make a cup, sprinkle a few squirts of baby powder into the formed cup, then turn the sock right side in, put it on your foot, raise your foot high and shake it, this spreads the powder on top and bottom of your foot. If feet are still cold mix some cayenne pepper with the baby powder.


Or put the powder into a plastic bag, shake your foot inside the bag so powder covers it completely and then put on your sock.
 

post #39 of 68

I have compulsively sweaty feet, so changing socks in the morning before hitting the hill, then changing again them again at lunch time is pretty much mandatory for me. I hate it though because my boots are a PITA to get in and out of right now, especially when cold. I've tried anti-perspirant on my feet but that seems to have little to no effect. A long time ago I tried baby powder in my socks, but stopped for some reason. Maybe I should try that again per other's suggestions. Probably wouldn't hurt to start using a boot glove as well since I do notice some moisture condensing under my boot shell in the area near my lower buckles.

post #40 of 68

abickford, you might also try mineral salt anti-perspirant (natural and available at places like Whole Foods) to reduce the amount of perspiration. Baby powder will help absorb it, for sure. I assume that you make sure your boots and liners get completely dry before you put them on again. You may have to remove the liner to be absolutely certain.

post #41 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post

abickford, you might also try mineral salt anti-perspirant (natural and available at places like Whole Foods) to reduce the amount of perspiration. Baby powder will help absorb it, for sure. I assume that you make sure your boots and liners get completely dry before you put them on again. You may have to remove the liner to be absolutely certain.


Cool, I'll look for that mineral salt type anti-perspirant. We definitely do a thorough drying of the boots between ski days, but that's a good tip to keep in mind for sure. Thanks.

post #42 of 68



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by camofoot View Post

Get a pair of CamoFoot disposable boot ponchos. They keep your feet dry and the snow out!!

It has multiple purposes, and originally created for the outside of your shoes/boots. We have found

that by putting our covers over your socks and into your boots you can ski or snowboard for hours!

www.camofoot.com


 

 You really have room for those in a properly fitted ski boot?

 

post #43 of 68

Yes they do!. They are made of rip-stop nylon so they fit very well. They have PVC on the bottom so they don't slip around.

 

 

 

post #44 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by abickford View Post

I have compulsively sweaty feet, so changing socks in the morning before hitting the hill, then changing again them again at lunch time is pretty much mandatory for me. I hate it though because my boots are a PITA to get in and out of right now, especially when cold. I've tried anti-perspirant on my feet but that seems to have little to no effect. A long time ago I tried baby powder in my socks, but stopped for some reason. Maybe I should try that again per other's suggestions. Probably wouldn't hurt to start using a boot glove as well since I do notice some moisture condensing under my boot shell in the area near my lower buckles.


abicford, this is coming from Little Tiger, who's been banned from this site, so can't post all the great advice she has to offer.

 

 

Quote:
If your feet sweat a lot you can look at these options:
1) Diphemanil Powder(Prantal) - this decreases sweating and provides a powder base to decrease chafing etc also... Often used by amputees for the area the prosthetic attaches if it sweats a lot.
 
2) You may want to check out information on hyperhidrosis (3% or so of population suffer from this - talk to doogiedoc?? - he is an epicski member and IIRC a dermatologist) 
Perhaps look at this link http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0004518  and this http://www.sweathelp.org/English/PFF_Treatment_Antiperspirants.asp for info on most common treatments.  Perhaps doogie can put you in contact with a suitable health care provider near you? IMO that would be a good solution if your feet sweat abnormally.
 

 

 Hope that helps.  Little Tiger is a pharmacist with a vast amount of experience and knowledge.  

 

 

post #45 of 68

Thanks Rick, I'll definitely look into that Diphemanil Powder. I've considered seeing a doctor, but want to first exhaust home remedies first, if you will.

 

I actually had a really good day yesterday, boot wise. I put baby powder in my ultra-thin wicking socks, kept my boot heaters on low, and put a boot glove on my boots. It was my first time wearing boot gloves, and I suspect they made the biggest difference followed by the baby powder. I don't think the boot gloves did much directly for warmth, but they definitely helped negate any chance of condensation forming inside my shell. This was another problem I was having, but misdiagnosed as snow getting into my boot instead of condensation and subsequent freezing. Cerrtainly a good step in the right direction overall.

post #46 of 68

abickford, next time, try the same thing but with your boot heaters turned off until you need them. Your shells are warm when you start the day?

post #47 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by abickford View Post

Thanks Rick, I'll definitely look into that Diphemanil Powder. 


You can't buy it at shops in the US, but can get it online.  Here's a link where you can get it.  http://www.pharmacyexpress.com/prantal-powder-50g.html

 

 

 

 

post #48 of 68

Thanks to MichaelA!  I'm investing all my spare dollars in actual ski gear; now that I own boots I'm slavering over skis, so I'll use the water bottle suggestion for the ride up.  The boots ride on the floor in front of the passenger seat, so that gets the shells warm.  But I'm adding the Hot Gear bags to my 2011-2012 shopping list.

post #49 of 68

Should have read this before my Vail trip. I just got back & have some frostbite on my right big toe.

I've seen a doctor and it seems to be clearing up fine.

 

Didn't help that it was -10 and went down to -32 that night in Breckenridge. (-52 at Steamboat that night!)

 

I use a homemade fan box with tubes which dries boots fine overnight.

I've got ideas now.  (Toe warmers above & below this toe) & lunch stops to warm up.

post #50 of 68



 

Originally Posted by abickford View Post

 I hate it though because my boots are a PITA to get in and out of right now, especially when cold.


The biggest benefit of the Hot Gear bag is the ease with which I can get into my boots and the comfort I feel as my foot settles into the warm, dry liners.

The drying of the boots, liners(without removing the liners,) gloves, neck gaiters(or head "condoms") hats, as well as, the numerous pockets and panels

for gear "transport," are great additional perks!

These bags are one of the best add'l components developed in the ski industry!!!

I wish I could put my boots in the bag to get them off!!   "Unfortunately," it usually takes at least one beer before I can remove them without a "bloodletting."

I also "unbuckle" every lift ride but do not have a problem with snow getting into my boots(maybe it's boot design.)

post #51 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post

abicford, this is coming from Little Tiger, who's been banned from this site, so can't post all the great advice she has to offer.

 

[snip]

 


I have the same issue as abickford. I've had it for decades, and have never found an entirely satisfactory solution. Everyone always tries to tell me that it must be because my socks are too warm, yadda, yadda, yadda. It's not. My feet just sweat all the time. Skiing or not skiing. Hot, freezing cold, or in between. They just sweat, period. Normally it's not too big a deal because I wear breathable footwear (mesh sneaks, etc.), but inside plastic ski boots it's a different matter. Therefore I'm psyched to see all these constructive helpful responses. Keep 'em coming! :)

post #52 of 68

Great thread, Dan. I always used to have cold feet (and still do on very cold days, but not as bad as my cold hands!). I am surprised no one has mentioned what has been the best thing I have found in addition to the great tips Dan mentioned- Intuition liners. These make an enormous difference, and they weigh half of what stock liners do as an additional bonus. They are also supremely comfortable (they're heat moulded to your feet) and give a real precision fit.

post #53 of 68

A couple of small thermos flasks with hot water to slip into your boots on the drive up . Silicone spray lightly applied to the sock. 

Duct tape across the gasket of my Lange's.  Boot gloves as a matter of course. 

 

A few things that have worked for me. Will look at Intuition liners, but wary after getting my liners worked on so that they are finally comfortable...

 

post #54 of 68

My feet don't sweat a lot, but allways cold.. My hands are too.. I have a really poor circulation..

Last weekend i used the baby powder/just in case/, combined with the cayenne pepper. It seemed like the cayenne pepper is working... My feet weren't warm, but at least i could feel them until the lunchtime break...

 

With me I couldn't care less about my feet getting cold... It is all about performance.. The way  I feel my feet and ski in the early morning is allways better, than when my feet are frozen.. Then I  don't feel them that well...

Another problem is that when my lower buckles are unbuckled/the first 3-4 runs/, the snow from the inside ski/which is allways carving / lands on my boots and little by little I get some snow inside...  I am not a fan of boot gloves/ not saying that they don't work/.....

 

Otherwise, great thread....

post #55 of 68

Great advice.  the only addition I can add is BOOT GLOVES...  they look a bit funny, but are one of the best investments ($30) I have ever made. They are easily equal to an electronic toe warmer, and they help keep snow out.  One of those simple things that just works so much better than you imagined. 

post #56 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrickySr. View Post



 


The biggest benefit of the Hot Gear bag is the ease with which I can get into my boots and the comfort I feel as my foot settles into the warm, dry liners.

The drying of the boots, liners(without removing the liners,) gloves, neck gaiters(or head "condoms") hats, as well as, the numerous pockets and panels

for gear "transport," are great additional perks!

These bags are one of the best add'l components developed in the ski industry!!!

I wish I could put my boots in the bag to get them off!!   "Unfortunately," it usually takes at least one beer before I can remove them without a "bloodletting."

I also "unbuckle" every lift ride but do not have a problem with snow getting into my boots(maybe it's boot design.)

TrickySr,

Buy a small, miniature hairdryer.  Carry it in your boot bag.  When it's time to take those boots off, plug the hairdryer into some outlet (I find them all over the place, under tables, in the bathroom, in hallways....) and blow hot air down behind the big plastic flaps on the front of your boots.  That air softens those two flaps plus the flaps below them.  I just warm one boot at a time; it takes no more than two minutes to get the flaps warm enough to get the boot off easily.  The process is really easy once you get used to humiliating yourself in the lodge with a noisy hairdryer.  Perk:  you can loan the thing out to other frustrated people.  Then you're a hero.  
 

post #57 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

TrickySr,

Buy a small, miniature hairdryer.  Carry it in your boot bag.  When it's time to take those boots off, plug the hairdryer into some outlet (I find them all over the place, under tables, in the bathroom, in hallways....) and blow hot air down behind the big plastic flaps on the front of your boots.  That air softens those two flaps plus the flaps below them.  I just warm one boot at a time; it takes no more than two minutes to get the flaps warm enough to get the boot off easily.  The process is really easy once you get used to humiliating yourself in the lodge with a noisy hairdryer.  Perk:  you can loan the thing out to other frustrated people.  Then you're a hero.  
 


If you ski outside the US, though, make sure to switch the voltage on the hair dryer...

 

...yes, I've done it. The hair dryer fan goes crazy and the heating elements get REALLY red and start to smell... I'm still using that dryer, though...

post #58 of 68

baby powder, Smart Wool socks and changing them at lunch makes for much warmer feet for me.  I can do withstand about any amount of cold as long as my feet are toasty!

post #59 of 68

I have boot heaters, a Hot Gear bag, and boot gloves. I've decided I need all three. The boot gloves make a big difference, they keep the wind out (wind is more of a problem for me in the Northeast than snow), and I can keep the boot heaters on a lower temp all day when I have the gloves on. I had to trim them in the front to be sure they didn't interfere with my bindings, but that wasn't a big deal.

 

The Hot Gear bags are amazing, and I've found that it does make a difference if they're plugged in at home overnight before the drive to the mountain -- the car adapter doesn't keep them as warm as they can get at home, so the head start helps a lot.

 

And yes, dry socks are essential.

 

Having to stop skiing because of numb toes is unacceptable.

post #60 of 68

PSA: passed by Marshals Dept. store yesterday, they still had some boot gloves, $10ea.  Earlier in the season they had Reusch world cup GS leather gloves for $35! eek.gif

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