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Low speed collision with snowboarder - Page 2

post #31 of 45

 

 

  at my local hill and every where else i have skied, it seems that there is a much higher amount of snowboarders that go down the hills out of control. my wife was knocked down 3 weeks ago by a boarder and my son last year which scares me to death, with him being so small and getting hit by a large teenager.

post #32 of 45

Have you ever snow boarded? "

 

Yes. For 17 years. And have never had an issue even close to what you describe. I admittedly stay away from crowds and try to ride at the lowest-crowd resorts and terrain possible, but I think a little bit of caution on both the part of the skier and snowboarder would prevent the type of collision you describe--like in driving, staying in someone's blind spot isn't really a great idea, either. Nor is riding side-by-side within feet of a total stranger. I'd call that a mutual-fault crash.

post #33 of 45

JoeUT,

 

He was rebellious and he was young. Those are simply the facts. But I left that he was a snowboarder out on purpose. No need to bring in prejudice or add fuel to the fire.

 

In the lift line he was harrassing our group. We were racers training and he started off with some jibes that were insulting and rude that were returned by telling him to mind his own business. At the top, he waited for us and confronted our coach and challenged him to fight. My coach is a trained in martial arts and simply stood there and told him to leave. A patroller insured that he did. We then proceeded halfway down the slope and because it was extremely busy (early season at A-Basin) we literally had our backs against the rope line on the edge of the trail to be as far out of the way as possible. While we were in a conversation, the snowboarder head directly towards us and attempted to spray us. He fell on his butt and proceeded to wipe out a line of standing skiers with sufficient force than when he hit my carbon fiber pole it snapped. I was at the bottom of the line. He plowed over 6 pairs of skis knocking many of us to the ground by displacing our skis from under us. The person trying to stop him took his skis off and was holding his hands in front of himself facing the snowboarder. He did touch the rider but not forcefully. We were still evaluating our personal health and the state of our equipment while he was being prevented from leaving.

 

The boarder was repeatedly malicious and without regard for our safety.

 

Quote:
 Terms like "rebellious youth" and "verbally abusive" are quite telling. 

 

I am always quite careful about my choice of words. In your quote above, my quoted words were carefully considered and particularly accurate.

 

You are right about one thing: it was a stupid incident. He was being rude, arrogant, abusive and threatening. We were simply standing in line and skiing and keeping to ourselves. He could have seriously injured any one of us if he had been one more foot to his right when he fell.

 

Regards,

 

MR

 

post #34 of 45

^^^^^

Wow! He is really lucky you are such good skiers; I can imagine a less skilled skier accidentally skewering that boarder with a ski pole when said skier was knocked off balance and fell as a result of the collision. 

 

PS.  I like nice solid Scott aluminum polesdevil.gif.

post #35 of 45

It happened to fast to serve shish-ka-boarder.

 

Regrets,

 

Hannibal L

post #36 of 45

dealing with traffic this last weekend, I thought of some of the discussions here. One of a skier's main skills is his vision. The ability to read terrain of course, but also the ability to see and read traffic.

 

so the boarder that hit the entire clinic did it on purpose, at least headed directly for the group initially. that seems punishable.

 

JT has a contrary attitude toward a group of people. don't waste your time explaining anything to him, he's not looking for communication; if you look back a little, that's obvious. 

post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

dealing with traffic this last weekend, I thought of some of the discussions here. One of a skier's main skills is his vision. The ability to read terrain of course, but also the ability to see and read traffic.

 

so the boarder that hit the entire clinic did it on purpose, at least headed directly for the group initially. that seems punishable.

 

JT has a contrary attitude toward a group of people. don't waste your time explaining anything to him, he's not looking for communication; if you look back a little, that's obvious. 

I assume you're talking about me. If so, you should learn how to abbreviate. Or read.

 

I have no contrary attitude to anyone, but the story doesn't sound plausible. And unless the snowboarder in question started his own underground radio station to rile up the local youth (Pump Up The Volume--classic Slater), the term "rebellious youth" is exaggerated to the point of being meaningless. Unless the kid was on drugs, alcohol or slightly psychotic, I just don't see someone picking a fight for no reason, going after an entire group of skiers, starting a physical altercation and then bowling them over. Completely illogical. Unless of course, there's more to the other side than is being told (wow!! really?! could that be?!!).  And if you think that the account of politely telling him to "mind his own business" is correct, then I have a few bridges to sell you.
 

And my initial point is that physically restraining someone to report a broken pole isn't exactly a commendable course of action. Neither is what the snowboarder did, obviously, but two wrongs...no right..etc. etc.

 

And in the future I'd appreciate if you don't speak on behalf of others. You have plenty to say yourself that I reckon you don't need to bite off more than you can chew.

post #38 of 45

davluri,

 

As far as dealing with bullies, like the rider in my posts, I learned a long time ago that the best way to deal with them is to ignore them. It only makes them more angry that they can't provoke you into a confrontation. Thanks for reminding me.

 

MR

post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

davluri,

 

As far as dealing with bullies, like the rider in my posts, I learned a long time ago that the best way to deal with them is to ignore them. It only makes them more angry that they can't provoke you into a confrontation. Thanks for reminding me.

 

MR


Genius.

post #40 of 45

I do 95% of my skiing on a hill with a vertical of under 200 feet. Due to this, the hill owners have decided to make most of the hill into a terrain park, serviced by a single tow rope. This park is very busy on the weekends, and I have been involved in many collisions in line for the tow rope, with both skiers and snowboarders. Just last weekend, I was involved in several collisions with others, and the hill was surprisingly empty. The first occurred when an out of control gaper on skis came flying through the lift line, clipped my leg, and went tumbling. I wasn't particularly upset, my skis are in park condition, so the damage didn't really matter, and I ended up with a minor bruise on my leg, as well as a bent pole, which was straightened by hitting it on a rail. After ensuring he was okay, I got to asking him what he was doing, and he said that he was trying to cut ahead in line, and lost control. The next one occurred in the same manner, except with a gaper snowboarder. His reason was that he couldn't stop. Again, no injury. The final one, I believe that I was at fault for it. I had just come off of a switch 360 off one of the jumps, and while riding out my landing, I clipped an inexperienced boarder who had jumped up the side of the landing. I consider myself at fault for this incident, because, judging where the boarder came from, I would have been able to see him if I was skiing forwards, whereas switch, he was in my blind spot. Cutting off another rider is poor park etiquette, but I still believe that it could have been avoided on my part. That being said, it was also his responsibility to look uphill. I think that the defining factor in all collisions is experience. Many of the inexperienced riders, especially the younger ones, have a tendency to be extremely arrogant and self-centered. Where I ski, almost 90% of the hill snowboards, and many of the young (12 to 16) year old riders have a tendency to be disrespectful towards others on the hill, whether it be cutting people off, cutting in the lift line, or spraying others with snow. This can't all be attributed to experience, but most of the experienced riders have been around long enough to respect others. In my opinion, with no prejudice against snowboarders ( having attempted it myself ), the young, inexperienced boarders have the worst attitude by far. I have had more than a few nasty comments directed at me while waiting in line, usually about skiing being "gay", or something equally imaginative. Another favourite is my Burton gloves. It seems to drive them nuts, until I point out their Orage and Armada jackets and pants. This attitude is most likely present among inexperienced skiers of the same age, but there aren't any where I ski, at least not in the park.

Just my two cents.

post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

What dos the fact that this was a snowboarder have to do with anything?   Was he an ethnic minority, too?


Nope-based on description, just another punk.

post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post




How exactly did he "prevent his departure" Because if it was all over a broken ski pole, I think his counter claim may have had more merit than you let on. Unless there is major personal injury, I don't see what the big deal is about getting contact information.

 

Sounds like a stupid incident all around, but it also sounds like a stupid incident told from the goggles of the narrator's side of the story. Terms like "rebellious youth" and "verbally abusive" are quite telling. Unless the kid was a total psycho, yelled at you from the lift and then decided to hunt you down and bowl you over, I'm sure there was more to it than that.



 Colorado LAW says individuals involved in a ski slope collision MUST exchange contact information or they are in violation. 

post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post




How exactly did he "prevent his departure" Because if it was all over a broken ski pole, I think his counter claim may have had more merit than you let on. Unless there is major personal injury, I don't see what the big deal is about getting contact information.

 

Sounds like a stupid incident all around, but it also sounds like a stupid incident told from the goggles of the narrator's side of the story. Terms like "rebellious youth" and "verbally abusive" are quite telling. Unless the kid was a total psycho, yelled at you from the lift and then decided to hunt you down and bowl you over, I'm sure there was more to it than that.



 Colorado LAW says individuals involved in a ski slope collision MUST exchange contact information or they are in violation. 


Colorado law says a lot of things. Doesn't mean that's the way it happens in real life. If two people bump into each other during skiing with no injuries or broken gear, then they're probably going to go their separate ways and break the law--because there's no reason to exchange information for such a non-event.

post #44 of 45

Generalizing here, and this has probably already been put forth, but from reading and imperical on-hill evidence it seems a majority of incidents involving disrespectful/wreckless skiing and riding involve the younger generation. The ratio of boarders to skiers in this age group (in our area anyway) is probably 3 to 1. Therefore the law of averages would dictate that three times more incidents of this sort would involve snowboards. People, however, mistakenly make the jump to snowboards=disrespectful activity, but I really think it is an age/generational thing and because most of these kids are riding it seems like it's a boarding issue. That all being said, the vast majority of kids I see on the hill are really good kids trying to do the right thing. And without boarding and kids I fear a lot of our smaller local hills would not make it.

post #45 of 45

no blind spot here, just an inability to turn

 

http://kontakt24.tvn.pl/temat,wypadek-na-stoku-snowboardzista-nie-wyhamowal,71728.html

 

apparently the girl ended up with a broken leg

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