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What is an Indemnified Binding? - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

I just don't get why anyone would even want to ski on obsolete technology.
Thank you Whiteroom for your clarity!

If you think that all that is new is better, you are misinformed. I have more confidence in certain high end bindings from 10 to 20 years ago than some

of the more "current offerings". Personally, if it is indemnified or not does not matter to me in the least. I ski at my own risk...imagine that!

 

Ski what makes you happy.

post #32 of 47

Don't conflate lack of indemnification with obsolescence.  They are driven by different factors.

post #33 of 47

It's not just whether a binding's design is up to modern standards, but whether the binding is in original condition, after 30 years of being skied hard and then driven home on top of a car on salted roads. (See post 3 ). Having just had the old spring on my garage door break I can believe that old, well used bindings might have problems. (Fortunately I wasn't in the garage to see--and feel--it break, but I sure heard it.) Metal may not fail as soon as plastic but it doesn't last forever--ever hear about old 737's opening up in flight like a can of sardines?

post #34 of 47

The Look Manual (the other Rossignol brand) - this manual is a European version, not Noth America

post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

I just don't get why anyone would even want to ski on obsolete technology.

Thank you Whiteroom for your clarity! 
 

Spoken like a good consumer!

post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post


 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

Most excellent explanation. When bindings drop off the list, the mfgs believe that due to age and average use, they will no longer perform to specs.

Why people would want to ski on bindings that are not up to date is beyond me. It is your legs and body you are protecting.

Rick G



No, that's really not it. The manufacturer thinks it's time you spent more money on something new that hopefully is made by them as well. If it lasted for 20 years, well, there's no "new" money in that!  Hense the popularity of making bindings out of plastic which degrades quicky do to UV exposure and other factors. To be honest, I don't really care for them at all, even new when I have a choice.(system skis)

 

Make mine METAL please!

 

Rick, I've got all metal bindings from the 70's that I would choose over some of the new crap that are being sold today without the slightest hesitation. And that IS because "It's my legs and body I'm protecting"

 

You have it right. I had a set of perfectly almost new bindings that were not on the list. The shop agreed the bindings looked good to them so I just told them to mount them with no receipt to me. After the mounting the bindings performed flawlessly in the boot test. I knew they were fine and they work perfectly on the slopes. Years ago bindings stayed on the list forever but now they want you to buy new ones.

post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

I just don't get why anyone would even want to ski on obsolete technology.
Thank you Whiteroom for your clarity!

If you think that all that is new is better, you are misinformed. I have more confidence in certain high end bindings from 10 to 20 years ago than some

of the more "current offerings". Personally, if it is indemnified or not does not matter to me in the least. I ski at my own risk...imagine that!

 

Ski what makes you happy.

Here, Here!

post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post
 

 

You have it right. I had a set of perfectly almost new bindings that were not on the list. The shop agreed the bindings looked good to them so I just told them to mount them with no receipt to me. After the mounting the bindings performed flawlessly in the boot test. I knew they were fine and they work perfectly on the slopes. Years ago bindings stayed on the list forever but now they want you to buy new ones.

Some shops will test some non indemnified bindings and then "fail" them. I would be more comfortable testing a binding that I know a person will be skiing to make sure it is functioning properly (or worse NOT) then failing them under visual inspection then them being out there with a gun that does not shoot straight. Now if we are talking a Marker M27 or Salomon S647, bindings that a prone to exploding, I think a one should be drawn, but all metal bindings like Look Z7, Salomon S997E's or 390RD's for examples..they are under consideration. I did try to test my "all metal" Spademan S4's...I could not under any circumstance get them to test properly. 

post #39 of 47
Question.

I have 2 pair of skis currently with system bindings - one pair is from 2003-2004 season mint volkl 168 5 stars.

Next year when the bindings fall of the list do I have to throw the skis away? Will anything new or more current mount on those skis. Are we saying no one will work on them ?

Skis are mint I am set up for a fishy deal here??? Should we all as consumers be insisting on flat skis ?
post #40 of 47
On another note I recently sold a number of 90's racing bindings on eBay many for big money...

Salomon 997 equlpe, pro pulse, Marker MRR, Look z turntables etc.

One guy actually emailed me with pics of my purple and yellow Look z turntables set up on his beer league rig and thanking me very much for the deal. He said they were the talk of his beer league and performed/ released flawlessly.

Man I so loved those bindings!!!! I had them orig on Olin 205 RTS. What a setup that was!!!!

I couldn't get a shop to mount any of them so off they went to DIY skiers who are not so easily scammed. No shed dwellers in my inventory all carefully stored in dry conditions ....
post #41 of 47

So 8 years ago I took a couple runs using 13+ year old Saloman 747 [race stock/no DIN numbers] on some old K2's. At the time they certainly seemed like they had 13+ years prior, the held my boot in and I could twist out with the same force I remembered from the past. After reading this thread I just stepped into them and they seemed the same as 8/20+ years ago.

 

What has happened to these bindings that I can't tell that makes them any less safe than they were years ago? Doesn't seem like there is any spring compression fatigue. Kicked the cr@p out of them to see if they seemed 'brittle" and they were fine.

 

Inquiring minds are curious……….

post #42 of 47
I bet cousin Eddie wouldn't ski on those Clark!

( sorry couldn't resist, great handle )

One of the pair mentioned above were my red/ white 947 equipe. Fantastic binding , beautiful too IMHO in the simple white/ red graphics.

Pulled em off a pair of 203 Rossi 4SK's threw the skis in the dumpster and sold em on eBay. Had multiple bidders on all of the auctions for my higher din racing bindings.

As for yours it probably depends on how they were stored..... Ideally you could pay somebody to test them but as this thread discussed unless you are a DIY guy with access to testing equipment good luck.

I am limited in my DIY binding skills at this point so off my beauties has to go .....
post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Griswald View Post
 

So 8 years ago I took a couple runs using 13+ year old Saloman 747 [race stock/no DIN numbers] on some old K2's. At the time they certainly seemed like they had 13+ years prior, the held my boot in and I could twist out with the same force I remembered from the past. After reading this thread I just stepped into them and they seemed the same as 8/20+ years ago.

 

What has happened to these bindings that I can't tell that makes them any less safe than they were years ago? Doesn't seem like there is any spring compression fatigue. Kicked the cr@p out of them to see if they seemed 'brittle" and they were fine.

 

Inquiring minds are curious……….


If they are the Equipe model with all metal housing around the heel piece they are probably OK.  If they are not the Equipe model this will eventually happen..

 

 

post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 


If they are the Equipe model with all metal housing around the heel piece they are probably OK.  If they are not the Equipe model this will eventually happen..

 

 

 

Those things $ucked back when they were new!

post #45 of 47

^^Same thing happens to most step in models, 727s 626s, even other brands like the Look step ins from the 90s.  Anything step in that isn't 100% metal housing can blow like that.

post #46 of 47

But they were told that the plastic was a modern improvement and better than those old fashion metal ones………...

 

Progress, sometimes it isn't.

 

Rusty, Audrey and Ellen all agree. Eddies still uses Cubco.

post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post
 

Any whiner who is suing just because they hurt themselves should either be permanently blacklisted or sentenced to the bunny slope indefinitely . .    

And what sux about this is Ski Patrollers are afraid to help, in case of liability.  When I go in for help, it's my fault, I did it and I know it.

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