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Avalanche Sticky

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Edit: To make it easier to figure out the links provided I am going to compile them in this post

 

Avalanche safety 

http://www.avalanche.ca/cac/training/online-course

pretty comprehensive free basic online avalanche course. Developed by the Canada Avalanche Center 

 

http://www.fsavalanche.org/Default.aspx?ContentId=17&LinkId=73&ParentLinkId=3

Basic guide to snow pits and stress tests. Provided by the Forest service

 

http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:fT32Fn6Pe7oJ:www.seattlepi.com/dayart/20011227/avalanchebasics.pdf+avalanche+basics&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjbPko7DkU6kiQalOYgj-DUE_0D22ZbMpkBZZYAjxasIEooIuC5dH5RS0aVXXP0qbIR5fzGQ2akF73naNyo5ficdZFIw3YTCviX1PfajNrikwbcDePkFtJSbZJEPL8_ItXhyZMn&sig=AHIEtbSX2oiPYan61Aa7v1BEPxcZDzynQw

Kinda like a cheat sheet. Plan on keeping a copy in my back pack when I go out

 

Forecasting

Colorado Avalanche Information Center

http://avalanche.state.co.us/index.php

 

Crested Butte, CO Avalanche Center

http://cbavalanchecenter.org/

 

Local user-driven information for northern New Mexico (where there is no forecasting):

Northern New Mexico Avalanche Exchange

 

Beacons 

http://beaconreviews.com/transceivers/index.asp

Has some great sections on search techniques, shoveling and just why beacons work the way they do........

 

General Information

http://pistehors.com/

The leading European news site -- French-oriented. Check out the forums for news and conditions.If you guys have an other links post them and maybe start a book list to.

 

http://www.henrysavalanchetalk.com/

Henry is a Bostonian who guides in Val d'Isere and runs avalanche training courses. Again, check out the forums for latest news and opinions.

 

 

Please post any links or books you think will be helpful

 

Jake

post #2 of 10

Colorado Avalanche Information Center

http://avalanche.state.co.us/index.php

 

Crested Butte, CO Avalanche Center

http://cbavalanchecenter.org/

post #3 of 10

That is a good idea.  Consider this thread stuck!

post #4 of 10

http://pistehors.com/

 

The leading European news site -- French-oriented. Check out the forums for news and conditions.

 

http://www.henrysavalanchetalk.com/

 

Henry is a Bostonian who guides in Val d'Isere and runs avalanche training courses. Again, check out the forums for latest news and opinions.

post #5 of 10

Local user-driven information for northern New Mexico (where there is no forecasting):

Northern New Mexico Avalanche Exchange

post #6 of 10

http://beaconreviews.com/transceivers/index.asp

 

Has some great sections on search techniques, shoveling and just why beacons work the way they do........

post #7 of 10

sure.  neat. 

 

avalanche.org.  most of ever-thing...

 

'cept a few things.

post #8 of 10
Münter 3x3 Reduction Factors - cheat sheet (European risk assessment system)
http://www.brooks-range.com/pdf/FreeTools/3x3_assessment.pdf
post #9 of 10

There are lots of backcountry training videos on YouTube. Here are 2 related to snow pit testing:

 

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post #10 of 10

An introduction for those who know nothing about backcountry skiing besides what they have seen in big mountain ski films.

 

http://kbyg.org

 

KBYG stands for Know Before You Go.  A non-profit based in Utah working to education middle and high school students who live in or near the Rockies, or anyone else who hasn't never seen a slab release.  The Utah 

WHY KBYG?

Avalanches kill an average of 42 people each year in North America. Hundreds more are injured. Avalanches don't just happen to extreme athletes - they can happen to those skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, hiking, driving, hunting, bike riding, and more - anyone who can get onto or underneath steep snow-covered slopes. Many avalanche victims don’t know they are in avalanche danger and are unprepared to deal with an avalanche. This doesn't have to happen – the danger signs are usually obvious to those who know what to look for. Just as those in Hawaii learn about the dangers of rip tides and shore breaks at an early age, those living, working, and recreating in snowy mountains need to learn about avalanches. What they learn can save their lives.

The Know Before You Go program was created in 2004 to teach people what they need to know to have fun and stay safe in avalanche terrain. The program was developed for middle and high school audiences but has been popular with all age groups. Know Before You Go was designed as a free 3/4 to 1 1/2 hour presentation, has been approved as a middle school PE credit in Utah, and can be presented in a classroom, school assembly, ski, snowboard, or snowmobile shop, community center - anywhere people can assemble to watch a powerful video and slide presentation. 

What you don't know can kill you. Before you go into the mountains in winter, Know Before You Go.

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